611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

LaFrontera
member support line
1-520-279-5737
M-F 5pm-8pm
24/7 weekends/holidays

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net
Health Sciences
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Long-Term Outlook for Most With Serious Brain Injury Is Better Than ThoughtStroke Prevented His Speech, But Brain Implant Brought It BackWHO Calls for Global Registry of Human Genome EditingScientists Track Spirituality in the Human BrainNew Insights Into How Eating Disorders Alter the BrainGene Differences Could Have Black Patients Undergoing Unnecessary BiopsiesCRISPR Therapy Fights Rare Disease Where Protein Clogs OrgansNew Genetic Insights Into Cause of ALSDeep Brain Stimulation Therapy May Help Parkinson's Patients Long TermAmazon Tribe Could Hold Key to Health of Aging BrainsMan Blind for 40 Years Regains Some Sight Through Gene TherapyNew Insights Into Treating Mild Head Injuries'Ghosts and Guardian Angels': New Insights Into Parkinson's HallucinationsHigher Education Won't Help Preserve the Aging Brain: StudyScientists Create Embryos With Cells From Monkeys, Humans'Game of Thrones' Study Reveals the Power of Fiction on the MindScientists Create Human Tear Glands That Cry in the LabAHA News: How Grief Rewires the Brain and Can Affect Health – and What to Do About ItCould Taking a Swing at Golf Help Parkinson's Patients?Autopsy Study May Explain Why Some COVID Survivors Have 'Brain Fog'Gene Study Probes Origins of Addison's DiseaseCould a Common Prostate Drug Help Prevent Parkinson's?AHA News: Hormones Are Key in Brain Health Differences Between Men and WomenNerve Drug Might Curb Spinal Cord Damage, Mouse Study SuggestsIs There a 'Risk-Taking' Center in the Brain?AHA News: Dr. Dre Recovering From a Brain Aneurysm. What Is That?Can 2 Nutrients Lower Your Risk for Parkinson's?New Clues to How Cancers Originate in the BrainBrain May Age Faster After Spinal Cord InjuryScans Reveal How COVID-19 Can Harm the BrainWhat Loneliness Looks Like in the BrainNeurologists Much Tougher to Find in Rural AmericaCOVID-19 Survival Declines When Brain Affected: StudyAs Testing Costs Rise, Neurology Patients May Skip ScreeningGene Therapy Shows No Long-Term Harm in Animals: StudyCould Gene Therapy Cure Sickle Cell Disease? Two New Studies Raise HopesCocoa Might Give Your Brain a Boost: StudyLockdown Loneliness Could Worsen Parkinson's SymptomsChildhood Lead Exposure Tied to Brain Changes in Middle AgeStaying Social Can Boost Healthy 'Gray Matter' in Aging BrainsDNA Analysis Might Reveal Melanoma RiskGenetics Might Explain Some Cases of Cerebral PalsyDiabetes Drug Metformin May Protect the Aging BrainNew Research Links Another Gene to Alzheimer's RiskYour Sex Affects Your Genes for Body Fat, Cancer, Birth WeightExperimental Drug Shows Promise Against ALSCould Gene Therapy Stem the Damage of Parkinson's?Genetic Research May Help Identify Causes of StillbirthDeep Brain Stimulation May Hold Promise in Alzheimer'sNeurology News Feed
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Mental Disorders
Mental Health Professions

Scientists Create Human Tear Glands That Cry in the Lab


HealthDay News
Updated: Mar 16th 2021

new article illustration

TUESDAY, March 16, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- Dutch scientists report they have grown miniature tear glands that actually cry.

They say these organoids -- tiny 3D-structures that mimic the function of actual human organs -- could lead to new treatments for dry eye disease and other tear gland disorders.

"And hopefully in the future, this type of organoids may even be transplantable to patients with non-functioning tear glands," said researcher Marie Bannier-Hélaouët, a doctoral student in biology and stem cell research at Hubrecht Institute in Utrecht, Netherlands.

Researchers said the organoids they created could be used to study how certain cells in the human tear gland produce tears or fail to do so. Eventually, it may even be possible to transplant such organoids into people whose tear glands don't work.

Located in the upper part of the eye socket, the tear gland secretes fluid that lubricates and nourishes the cornea. Tears also have antibacterial properties.

"Dysfunction of the tear gland, for example in Sjögren's syndrome, can have serious consequences including dryness of the eye or even ulceration of the cornea. This can, in severe cases, lead to blindness," said Dr. Rachel Kalmann, an ophthalmologist from UMC Utrecht Hospital who participated in the research.

But exactly how tear glands function was unknown and there was no reliable model to study them.

For this study, researchers used organoid technology to grow miniature versions of mouse and human tear glands in a dish, and then found a way to make them cry.

"Organoids are grown using a cocktail of growth-stimulating factors. We had to modify the usual cocktail to make the organoids capable of crying," Bannier-Hélaouët said in a Hubrecht Institute news release.

Researchers found that the right mixture of growth factors could induce the organoids to cry. Here's a video of the organoids doing just that in the lab:



"Further experiments revealed that different cells in the tear gland make different components of tears. And these cells respond differently to tear-inducing stimuli," said team member Yorick Post, who was at the Hubrecht Institute during this project.

Researchers said these organoids can be used to test new drugs for people who don't produce enough tears and to study how cancers of the tear gland form and may be treated.

The findings were published March 16 in the journal Cell Stem Cell.

More information

The U.S. National Eye Institute has more on dry eye.

SOURCE: Hubrecht Institute, news release, March 16, 2021