611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

LaFrontera
member support line
1-520-279-5737
M-F 5pm-8pm
24/7 weekends/holidays

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net
Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
'BPA-Free' Bottles Might Need a Run Through Your Dishwasher FirstAHA News: 5 Critical Steps to Help Prevent a StrokeWhat's the Right Amount of Sleep for a Healthy Heart?AHA News: Take Stock of Your Health With This Post-Lockdown ChecklistYou & Your Friends Are Vaccinated. So Why Is Socializing Again Scary?Even Before COVID, Many More People Died Early in U.S. Versus EuropeYour Zip Code Could Help or Harm Your BrainAHA News: 5 Things to Know This Earth Day About How the Environment Affects HealthPhysically Active at Work? It's Not as Healthy as Leisure ExerciseRe-focusing on Getting Fit? Heart Experts Offer These TipsNearly Half of U.S. Veterans Cited 'Personal Growth' During Pandemic: SurveyAHA News: The Secret to Good Health Is No Secret. So Why Is It So Hard to Achieve?'Couch Potato' Lifestyles Cause Up to 8% of Global Deaths: StudyHave to Travel During Spring Break? Here's How to Stay SafeHow Learning a New Language Changes Your BrainGen X, Millennials in Worse Health Than Prior Generations at Same Age'Game of Thrones' Study Reveals the Power of Fiction on the MindTry 'Microbreaks' for a Real Workday BoostCan Fitbits, Apple Watch Be a Dieter's Best Friend?Spring Cleaning Can Sweep Away Allergens From Your HomeUnhealthy in Your 20s? Your Mind May Pay the Price Decades LaterAHA News: How to Get Better Sleep Amid the Pandemic – And Why You ShouldDoubly Good: Healthy Living Cuts Your Odds for the 2 Leading KillersDrink Up! Humans Are the 'Water-Saving Apes''Spring Forward' This Weekend By Checking Your Home Smoke AlarmsClocks 'Spring Forward' on Sunday: Be PreparedWhich Americans Live Longest? Education Matters More Now Than RaceThe Skinny on Wrinkle-Free SkinSnow Shoveling, Slips on Ice Bring Cold Weather DangersWhen Facebook, Twitter Flag Posts as 'Unverified,' Readers ListenAHA News: Calming Us Down or Revving Us Up, Music Can Be Good for the HeartGet Your '5 a Day' Fruits and Veggies to Live LongerAHA News: Why Experts Say a Good Mood Can Lead to Good HealthGrumpy? Depressed? Try a More Regular Sleep ScheduleCold Facts on Avoiding Snow and Ice DangersDrivers May Be Inhaling Dangerous Carcinogens Inside Their CarsDaytime Napping May Be in Your GenesAHA News: Watch Your Heart Rate, But Don't Obsess About ItMany U.S. Adults Aren't Getting Healthy Amounts of Fruits, VegetablesPoll Finds Americans Highly Stressed by Politics, PandemicCould Working Outside Help Prevent Breast Cancer?Kiss Chapped Lips Goodbye This WinterAHA News: 5 Things Nutrition Experts Want You to Know About New Federal Dietary GuidelinesLockdowns Might Not Have Long-Term Psychological Effect: StudyAre the Moon's Phases Affecting Your Sleep?Midday Nap Could Leave You Smarter: StudyAHA News: The Head Is Connected to the Heart – and Can Influence HealthYou're More Likely to Maintain Social Distance If Your Friends Do: StudyMaybe Money Can Help Buy Happiness, After AllStressed Out By the News? Here's Tips to Help Cope
LinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Smoking
Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management

Vision Problems? Here's a Guide to Which Specialist Is Right for You


HealthDay News
Updated: Jan 17th 2021

new article illustration

SUNDAY, Jan. 17, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- If you're having eye problems, you may not know which type of specialist to consult.

Here's some help from experts who explain the roles of an optometrist, ophthalmologist, pediatric ophthalmologist, orthoptist and optician.

Optometrists provide comprehensive eye care, including evaluations for glasses and contact lenses and common eye diseases.

"They play a role in monitoring chronic conditions such as cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetes," Dr. Danielle Natale, an optometrist at the Krieger Eye Institute in Baltimore, said in an institute news release. They can also treat acute eye problems such as pink eye or sties.

Ophthalmologists are physicians who have completed four years of medical school and four years of residency training. They diagnose and treat eye diseases and prescribe eyeglasses and contact lenses, and they also perform eye surgery.

A pediatric ophthalmologist is specially trained to examine and treat children of all ages and abilities -- especially those who are unable or too young to read the letters on an eye chart.

"To make the environment more child-friendly, ophthalmologists will often play games with the patients or show them movies during their exam," said pediatric ophthalmologist Dr. Samantha Feldman, who also practices at the Krieger Eye Institute.

Orthoptists aren't common, with only about 400 in the United States. They aren't doctors, according to the American Association of Certified Orthoptists. But orthoptists are uniquely skilled in diagnosis and assist physicians in providing surgical and nonsurgical treatment for eye disorders, with an emphasis on binocular vision and eye movements.

They typically help with conditions such as strabismus, amblyopia, and double vision. Treatments they help administer include patching therapy, prisms and convergence exercises. They help evaluate patients of all ages, but most often children.

Opticians, who also are not doctors, don't treat or diagnose eye conditions. They design and fit eyeglass lenses and frames for patients according to prescriptions from ophthalmologists and optometrists.

More information

Prevent Blindness has more on eye care.

SOURCE: Krieger Eye Institute/LifeBridge Health, news release, Jan. 8, 2021