611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

LaFrontera
member support line
1-520-279-5737
M-F 5pm-8pm
24/7 weekends/holidays

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net
Aging & Geriatrics
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Aphasia Affects Brain Similar to Alzheimer's, But Without Memory LossWeight Training Benefits Older Women, Men Equally, Study ShowsGet Fit in Middle Age to Boost Your Aging Brain'Stepped' Approach to Exercise Can Help With Arthritic KneesOlder and Getting Surgery? Get Fit BeforehandHow Are 'Super Agers' Protected From Alzheimer's and Mental Decline?How to Talk to Your Doctor About Arthritis PainHigh Blood Pressure in Middle Age Can Harm Your BrainHigh-Dose Vitamin D Won't Prevent Seniors' Falls: StudyCould Dirty Air Help Speed Alzheimer's?Delirium May Be Only Sign of Severe COVID in Elderly: StudyMost Americans Over 50 Would Get COVID Vaccine: PollSitting Raises Women's Odds for Heart FailureAmid Lockdowns, Online Exercise Classes Help Seniors Feel Less AloneFish Oil, Vitamin D and Exercise: How Helpful Are They If You're Over 70?When Your Spouse Gripes About Aging, It Might Harm Your HealthUpbeat Outlook Could Shield Your BrainStaying Active as You Age Not a Guarantee Against DementiaFading Sense of Smell Could Signal Higher Death Risk in Older AdultsExercise Boosts Physical, Mental Well-Being of Older Cancer SurvivorsOlder Adults Turning to Pot for Common Health ProblemsStaying Social Can Boost Healthy 'Gray Matter' in Aging BrainsIs Apathy an Early Sign of Dementia?Many Older Americans With Heart Failure Take 10 or More MedsShall You Dance? Study Finds Dancing Helps Seniors Avoid FallsStudy Sheds Light on Why COVID-19 Hits Elderly HardestEarly Results Show Moderna's COVID Vaccine Safe, Effective in Older PeopleLockdown Could Worsen Hearing Woes for U.S. SeniorsOlder Patients at Risk When Dentists Prescribe OpioidsFall Risk Rises Even in Alzheimer's Early StagesMiddle-Aged Americans Report More Pain Than SeniorsPoll Finds Pandemic Surge in Loneliness Among Older AdultsIsolation, Loneliness of Lockdowns Is Tough on America's SeniorsTeens, Seniors Are Often Driving the Least Safe CarsCommon Meds Tied to Faster Mental Decline in SeniorsSeniors With Depression Show Resilience in Face of PandemicAre Opioids Prescribed Too Freely as Patients Are Moved to Nursing Homes?Telehealth Skyrocketing Among Older AdultsWhy Are Dementia Patients Getting Risky Psychiatric Drugs?Education Benefits the Brain Over a LifetimeCould Daily Low-Dose Aspirin Hasten Cancer in Seniors?Can Seniors Handle Results of Alzheimer's Risk Tests?Telemedicine Is Here: Experts Offer Tips for SeniorsMany Stay Optimistic Until Old Age HitsAre Baby Boomers Less Sharp Than Previous Generations?Many Older Adults Can't Connect With Telehealth: StudyMany Older Americans Getting Cancer Screens They Don't Need: StudyMore Education May Slow Start of Early-Onset Alzheimer'sMany Older Americans Staying Strong in the PandemicRepeat Bone Density Tests Might Not Be Needed, Study Finds
Questions and AnswersLinksBook ReviewsSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Elder Care
Lifespan Development

Aphasia Affects Brain Similar to Alzheimer's, But Without Memory Loss


HealthDay News
Updated: Jan 13th 2021

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2021 (HealthDay News) -- A rare brain disease that causes loss of language skills doesn't lead to memory loss, a new study finds.

The condition is called primary progressive aphasia and about 40% of people who have it have underlying Alzheimer's disease, according to researchers. Their study was published online Jan. 13 in the journal Neurology.

"While we knew that the memories of people with primary progressive aphasia were not affected at first, we did not know if they maintained their memory functioning over years," said study author Dr. M. Marsel Mesulam, director of the Center for Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

"This has been difficult to determine because most memory tests rely on verbal skills that these people have lost or are losing," he said in a journal news release.

For the study, Mesulam's team assessed 17 people with primary progressive aphasia associated with Alzheimer's disease and 14 people with typical Alzheimer's disease and memory loss.

To test memory skills, participants with primary progressive aphasia were shown pictures of common objects. Ten minutes later, they were shown the same pictures along with others and asked to choose which they had seen before.

This test was given initially and then again an average of 2.4 years later.

Meanwhile, participants with Alzheimer's listened to a list of common words and were later given the same words along with others and asked to identify which they had heard before. They were tested initially and again an average of 1.7 years later.

Both groups also had language skills tests.

While participants with aphasia showed no decline in memory skills during the study, they had significant language-skill declines. The patients with typical Alzheimer's, meanwhile, had equally severe declines in verbal memory and language skills.

Brain autopsies from eight of the aphasia patients and all of Alzheimer's disease patients revealed similar amounts of Alzheimer's-related plaques and tangles in both groups.

"More research is needed to help us determine what factors allow [people with primary progressive aphasia] to show this resilience of memory skills even in the face of considerable Alzheimer's disease pathology in the brain," Mesulam said.

More information

The National Aphasia Association has more on primary progressive aphasia.

SOURCE: Neurology, news news release, Jan. 13, 2021