611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

LaFrontera
member support line
1-520-279-5737
M-F 5pm-8pm
24/7 weekends/holidays

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net
Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
I've Already Had COVID-19, Do I Need the Vaccine?What Will COVID-19 Look Like Years From Now?First Computer Model of Entire COVID Virus Will Aid ResearchStopping Common Heart Meds Could Be Risky for Kidney PatientsU.S. COVID Vaccine Rollout Nears 1 Million Doses Per DayJohnson & Johnson's One-Dose COVID Vaccine Promising in Early TrialLockdowns' Benefits for Air Quality Weren't as Big as Thought: StudyPeople's 'Microbiomes' Might Influence COVID-19 Severity: StudyNew Insights Into How COVID-19 Damages the BrainCollege Campuses Are COVID 'Superspreaders,' Study FindsStuck at Home, Suffering With COVID? Experts Offer Guidance on CareCOVID Daily Death Toll Sets New U.S. Record, Soars Past 4,400AHA News: Registries Could Offer Insight Into COVID-19's Impact on College Athletes' HeartsResearch Reveals Why COVID Pneumonia Is More DeadlyPandemic Is Tied to Big Rise in U.S. Heart DeathsCommon Diabetes Meds Tied to Serious COVID-19 ComplicationPlant-Based Diet Brings Better 'Microbiome,' Healthier LifeAnswering Your Qs on the New COVID VaccinesEven Mild Cases of COVID Can Leave 'Long-Haul' Illness, Study ShowsCommon Blood Pressure Meds Won't Up Risks for COVID Patients: StudySix Months Later, Most Wuhan COVID Survivors Still Have Health IssuesHealth Officials Work to Speed Up U.S. COVID Vaccine RolloutAllergists' Group Offers Guidelines on COVID-19 VaccinesFacebook Posts Big Drivers in Vaccine Resistance, Study FindsBlack Patients at Higher Risk When Type 1 Diabetes and COVID CombineBiden Says He Will Release All Vaccine Doses After Taking Office'Pandemic Fatigue' Setting in? Here's How to Stay Safe and StrongCould High Pollen Levels Trigger Pelvic Pain?Record Number of COVID Cases, Deaths Reported in U.S.COVID Survivors' Plasma Might Prevent Worsening Illness in Older Patients: StudyAHA News: Dr. Dre Recovering From a Brain Aneurysm. What Is That?Certain Antibiotics Linked With Upped Risk for Deadly Aortic AneurysmsDeath Risk Nearly Doubles When COVID Strikes People With Heart FailureMore Infectious COVID Variant Likely Widespread in the U.S., Experts SayRed Cross Issues Call for More Blood Plasma to Treat COVID PatientsPediatricians' Group Says School Is Priority, With Proper Safety MeasuresMoves, Evictions Often Trigger Harmful Breaks in Health Care: StudyAllergic Reactions to COVID Vaccines Are Rare, Resolved on Site: CDCSurvey Shows Mental Woes Spiked in U.S. Pandemic's First MonthsYour 'To-Do' List as You Await a COVID VaccineSome Americans Can't Access Telemedicine, Study ShowsU.S. COVID Hospitalizations Reach Record High as California Hospitals Run Out of OxygenVaccine Rollout Could Have Americans Back to Normalcy by Summer, Expert SaysCould Umbilical Cord Stem Cells Be a Lifesaver Against Severe COVID-19?Kids With Congenital Heart Disease Face Higher Odds of Mental Health IssuesAlmost 47 Million Americans Already Infected With Coronavirus by Nov. 15: StudyAllergists Offer Reassurance on COVID Vaccines' SafetyBrain May Age Faster After Spinal Cord InjuryOn Waitlist for Liver Transplants, Women Die More Often Than MenGlobal Warming May Be Triggering Toxic Algae Blooms Along U.S. West Coast
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Health Care Workers, Nursing Home Residents to Get First Vaccines: Panel

HealthDay News
by By Dennis Thompson HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Dec 1st 2020

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Dec. 1, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Health care workers and people in nursing homes should be at the front of the line for upcoming COVID-19 vaccines, a U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advisory panel recommended Tuesday.

The recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice (ACIP), if heeded, will steer the initial short supply of vaccines to about 21 million health care personnel and 3 million Americans working or living in long-term care facilities.

The logic is that health care workers are crucial to keeping overtaxed U.S. health care systems working. And residents of long-term care facilities have accounted for 6% of all cases and 40% of all COVID-19 deaths in the United States, according to one presentation made by the ACIP panel.

The panel's advice will be reviewed by CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield and, if accepted, will provide badly needed official guidance to state officials scrambling to plan for vaccine distribution.

The committee voted 13 to 1 to prioritize the two groups, according to the Washington Post.

The novel coronavirus has killed nearly 270,000 people and infected more than 13.5 million in the United States, with a new surge causing cases and deaths to skyrocket in recent weeks.

A presentation to the committee noted at least 243,000 confirmed COVID-19 infections have occurred among health care personnel, with 858 deaths recorded.

Health care personnel include employees at hospitals, long-term care facilities, outpatient clinics, home health care services and pharmacies, along with paramedics and public health workers, according to the presentation.

U.S. officials expect to have about 40 million doses of vaccines from Pfizer and Moderna distributed by the end of the year -- just enough to immunize 20 million people with the two-dose vaccine, the Post said.

In 2021, five to 10 million doses of vaccine are anticipated to ship each week.

ACIP provided guidance on Tuesday even though the U.S. Food and Drug Administration hasn't yet authorized the two leading vaccines for emergency use.

That's because states needed the committee's input before Friday, which is their deadline for submitting their vaccine distribution plans to the federal government, the Post reported.

The next phase of priority vaccinations could focus on essential workers such as educators, food and agriculture workers, utility workers, police, firefighters, corrections officers and transportation employees, the ACIP presentation said.

This represents about 87 million people, and also would promote vaccination among minority communities that have been hit hard by the pandemic, the Post reported.

After that, people aged 65 and older (about 53 million) and adults with high-risk medical conditions (about 100 million) could be next in line for vaccination, the presentation noted.

"If we had vaccine for every person in the United States, it would be an easy decision," Jose Romero, the advisory group's chairman and the Arkansas secretary of health, said in an interview with the Post over the weekend. "But we don't, and that's why we have to make a prioritization scheme for the initial set of vaccines."

"We want to give vaccine to those who need it most in our society," he said. "I can tell you, in my opinion, this is the most weighty vote we have given in my seven years on the committee."

More Information

The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice has more about allocating COVID-19 vaccines.