611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

LaFrontera
member support line
1-520-279-5737
M-F 5pm-8pm
24/7 weekends/holidays

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Women's Health
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
FDA Warns of Dangers of Common Painkillers During PregnancyWomen at Higher Risk When Heart Attack Strikes the YoungCancer Takes Heavy Toll on Women's Work and Finances: StudyFor Many Pregnant Women, COVID-19 Has Prolonged EffectWomen's Reproductive Health Tied to Later Heart DiseaseSome Breast Surgery Won't Harm Ability to BreastfeedRadiation Plus Surgery May Be Best Against an Early Form of Breast CancerIrregular, Long Periods Tied to Shorter Life SpanTough Menopause May Signal Future Heart WoesHPV Vaccine Proves Its Mettle Against Cervical CancerAHA News: Despite Same Symptoms, Men and Women Don't Always Get Same Mini-Stroke DiagnosisMore U.S. Women Using Marijuana to Help Ease Menopause: StudyWomen Get Worse Care for Heart AttackBreast Cancer Treatment Comes Later, Lasts Longer for Black WomenFewer U.S. Women Aware of Their Heart RisksBaby's Heart Rate Reflects Mom's Mental HealthIs an Early Form of Breast Cancer More Dangerous Than Thought?1 Woman in 5 With Migraine Avoiding Pregnancy: StudyAHA News: Young Women May Face Greater Stroke Risk Than Young MenExperts Offer Guidance on a Common But Underreported Menopause SyndromePregnancy May Delay MSCould Antibiotics Make Breast Milk Less Healthy for Babies?AHA News: Researchers Explore How COVID-19 Affects Heart Health in Black WomenThere's No Safe Amount of Caffeine in Pregnancy: ReportAHA News: Preeclampsia May Double a Woman's Chances for Later Heart FailureIn-Person Pregnancy Checks Won't Raise COVID RiskCan Women With Early Breast Cancer Skip Post-Op Radiation?'Morning Sickness' Doesn't Stick to the A.M., Study ConfirmsBirth Control Pill Could Cut Women's Risk for AsthmaAntibiotics Might Lower Effectiveness of Birth Control PillWomen Smokers Less Likely to Get Cancer ScreeningsMammograms in 40s Can Save Women's Lives, Study FindsMoms' Obesity May Affect Fetal Brain DevelopmentGynecological Exam, Heart Screening Should Go Hand-in-HandU.S. Women More Likely to Skip Meds Than Men, Study FindsEarly Periods Tied to Worse Menopause SymptomsBreastfeeding OK After Mom Has Anesthesia, Experts SayFew U.S. Women Know About Cancer That Develops Near Breast Implants: StudyAmerican Cancer Society Recommends HPV Test for Cervical Cancer ScreeningGynecological Cancers Not a Risk for Severe COVID-19: StudyIf Mom-to-Be Lives Near Airport, Odds for Preemie Birth RiseWhat's the Best 'Uterine-Sparing' Treatment for Fibroids?Repeat Bone Density Tests Might Not Be Needed, Study FindsSmoking Raises Aneurysm Risk for WomenGene Could Explain Why Some Women Don't Need Pain Relief in ChildbirthHRT Might Help Older Women Ward Off Recurrent UTIsSmog Harms Women's Brains, But One Food May Help Buffer the DamageBeta Blocker Heart Meds Might Pose Special Risks for WomenExercise Might Make Breast Milk's Goodness Even BetterPreterm Birth Ups Mom's Long-Term Heart Disease Risk: Study
Questions and AnswersLinksBook ReviewsSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Wellness and Personal Development
Mental Disorders

FDA Warns of Dangers of Common Painkillers During Pregnancy

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Oct 16th 2020

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Oct. 16, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- If you're pregnant and you think popping nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for your aches and pains is safe, think again.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned on Thursday that taking these widely used painkillers -- which include Advil, Motrin, Aleve and Celebrex -- at 20 weeks or later in a pregnancy could raise the risk of complications.

Specifically, taking the medications can cause rare but serious kidney problems in the unborn baby that can lead to low levels of amniotic fluid, increasing the potential for pregnancy complications.

After about 20 weeks of pregnancy, the fetus's kidneys begin producing most of the amniotic fluid, so kidney problems can cause low levels of this protective fluid. Low levels of amniotic fluid usually resolve if a pregnant woman stops taking an NSAID, according to the FDA.

The agency said it has ordered that NSAID labeling warns women and their health care providers about this risk.

NSAIDs are prescription and over-the-counter (OTC) drugs that include ibuprofen, naproxen, diclofenac and celecoxib, which are taken to treat pain and fever. Aspirin is also an NSAID, but the new labeling rules don't apply to the use of low-dose aspirin.

"It is important that women understand the benefits and risks of the medications they may take over the course of their pregnancy," Dr. Patrizia Cavazzoni, acting director of FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in an agency news release.

One ob-gyn noted that over-the-counter NSAIDs may pose the greatest danger to pregnant women.

"Many female patients use ibuprofen regularly for headaches and menstrual cramps," said Dr. Jennifer Wu, from Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "It is very important that these patients realize that ibuprofen and other NSAIDs pose a unique danger to pregnant patients.

"The majority of patients get these medications over the counter and may even be using them at the prescription-strength level," Wu added. "While many prescription drugs come with the oversight of the pharmacist and a warning label, the over-the-counter medications lack all this. Patients also often assume that over-the-counter necessarily means safe."

The FDA's warning comes after a review of medical literature and cases reported to the agency about low amniotic fluid levels or kidney problems in unborn babies associated with NSAID use during pregnancy.

For prescription NSAIDs, the new FDA warning recommends limiting use between about 20 weeks to 30 weeks of pregnancy. A warning to avoid taking NSAIDs after about 30 weeks of pregnancy was already included in prescribing information due to a risk of heart problems in unborn babies.

If a health care provider believes NSAIDs are necessary between about 20 and 30 weeks of pregnancy, use should be limited to the lowest possible dose and shortest possible length of time, the FDA said.

Makers of OTC NSAIDs intended for adults will also make similar updates to their labeling, according to the agency.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more on NSAIDs.