611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

LaFrontera
member support line
1-520-279-5737
M-F 5pm-8pm
24/7 weekends/holidays

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net
Health Sciences
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Long-Term Outlook for Most With Serious Brain Injury Is Better Than ThoughtStroke Prevented His Speech, But Brain Implant Brought It BackWHO Calls for Global Registry of Human Genome EditingScientists Track Spirituality in the Human BrainNew Insights Into How Eating Disorders Alter the BrainGene Differences Could Have Black Patients Undergoing Unnecessary BiopsiesCRISPR Therapy Fights Rare Disease Where Protein Clogs OrgansNew Genetic Insights Into Cause of ALSDeep Brain Stimulation Therapy May Help Parkinson's Patients Long TermAmazon Tribe Could Hold Key to Health of Aging BrainsMan Blind for 40 Years Regains Some Sight Through Gene TherapyNew Insights Into Treating Mild Head Injuries'Ghosts and Guardian Angels': New Insights Into Parkinson's HallucinationsHigher Education Won't Help Preserve the Aging Brain: StudyScientists Create Embryos With Cells From Monkeys, Humans'Game of Thrones' Study Reveals the Power of Fiction on the MindScientists Create Human Tear Glands That Cry in the LabAHA News: How Grief Rewires the Brain and Can Affect Health – and What to Do About ItCould Taking a Swing at Golf Help Parkinson's Patients?Autopsy Study May Explain Why Some COVID Survivors Have 'Brain Fog'Gene Study Probes Origins of Addison's DiseaseCould a Common Prostate Drug Help Prevent Parkinson's?AHA News: Hormones Are Key in Brain Health Differences Between Men and WomenNerve Drug Might Curb Spinal Cord Damage, Mouse Study SuggestsIs There a 'Risk-Taking' Center in the Brain?AHA News: Dr. Dre Recovering From a Brain Aneurysm. What Is That?Can 2 Nutrients Lower Your Risk for Parkinson's?New Clues to How Cancers Originate in the BrainBrain May Age Faster After Spinal Cord InjuryScans Reveal How COVID-19 Can Harm the BrainWhat Loneliness Looks Like in the BrainNeurologists Much Tougher to Find in Rural AmericaCOVID-19 Survival Declines When Brain Affected: StudyAs Testing Costs Rise, Neurology Patients May Skip ScreeningGene Therapy Shows No Long-Term Harm in Animals: StudyCould Gene Therapy Cure Sickle Cell Disease? Two New Studies Raise HopesCocoa Might Give Your Brain a Boost: StudyLockdown Loneliness Could Worsen Parkinson's SymptomsChildhood Lead Exposure Tied to Brain Changes in Middle AgeStaying Social Can Boost Healthy 'Gray Matter' in Aging BrainsDNA Analysis Might Reveal Melanoma RiskGenetics Might Explain Some Cases of Cerebral PalsyDiabetes Drug Metformin May Protect the Aging BrainNew Research Links Another Gene to Alzheimer's RiskYour Sex Affects Your Genes for Body Fat, Cancer, Birth WeightExperimental Drug Shows Promise Against ALSCould Gene Therapy Stem the Damage of Parkinson's?Genetic Research May Help Identify Causes of StillbirthBlood Test Heralds New Era in Alzheimer's DiagnosisDeep Brain Stimulation May Hold Promise in Alzheimer's
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Mental Disorders
Mental Health Professions

Your Sex Affects Your Genes for Body Fat, Cancer, Birth Weight

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Sep 15th 2020

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Sept. 15, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say your biological sex affects gene expression in nearly every type of tissue -- influencing body fat, cancer and birth weight.

Gene expression is the amount of product created by a gene for cell function, the international team of researchers explained.

They said their findings could prove important for personalized medicine, creating new drugs and predicting patient outcomes.

"These discoveries suggest the importance of considering sex as a biological variable in human genetics and genomics studies," said project leader Barbara Stranger, an associate professor of pharmacology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

The researchers analyzed 44 types of healthy human tissue from 838 people to find out if there were differences between women and men in the average amount of gene expression.

They discovered that 37% of all human genes were expressed at different levels in women and men in at least one type of tissue.

They also identified 369 instances where a genetic variant present in males and females affected gene expression to a different degree in each sex. This led to the discovery of 58 previously unreported links between genes and blood pressure, cholesterol levels, breast cancer and body fat percentage.

Gender differences in gene expression were also found for genes involved in how the body responds to medications, how women control blood sugar levels in pregnancy, how the immune system functions and how cancer develops.

"If specific genes or genetic variants contribute differentially to a given trait in males and females, it could suggest sex-specific biomarkers, therapeutics and drug dosing," Stranger said in a Northwestern news release.

"In the future, such knowledge may form a critical component of personalized medicine or may reveal disease biology that remains obscured when considering males and females as a single group," she said.

The study was published Sept. 10 in the journal Science.

More information

The American Society of Human Genetics has more on genetics.