611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

LaFrontera
member support line
1-520-279-5737
M-F 5pm-8pm
24/7 weekends/holidays

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
CDC Urges All Americans to Wear Face Masks as Death Count RisesAHA News: Amid Coronavirus Crisis, Exercise Caution When Exercising OutdoorsAsthma, COPD Raise Odds for Severe COVID-19, Lung Experts WarnCoronavirus Hangs Around Even After Symptoms SubsideCan Food From an Infected Cook Give You COVID-19?Pregnant Women Need to Guard Against CoronavirusVitamin D Might Aid Seniors' Recovery From Hip Fracture: StudyWith 3D Printer, N.Y. Hospital Converts Sleep Apnea Machines Into VentilatorsAnother COVID-19 Vaccine Being Tested in Mice'Stay at Home' Orders Are Stressing U.S. Families, Survey ShowsAn Expert's Guide to Fighting Coronavirus StressHeart Patients Need to Be Wary of CoronavirusU.S. Coronavirus Cases Pass 200,000, as Jobless Claims Soar to 10 MillionIs Thyroid Hormone Dangerously Overprescribed in Older Patients?'Pink Eye' Often a Symptom of COVID-19, and Infection Via Tears PossibleMild COVID-19 Often Appears With Only Gastro Symptoms: StudyFDA Pulls Heartburn Drug Zantac From MarketCertain Health Conditions Up Risks for Severe COVID-19Parents, Arm Your Kids Against COVID-19 With Good Hand-Washing HabitsFDA Approves Malaria Drugs to Treat COVID-19, Despite Little Proof They Work'Fever Tracker' Suggests Social Distancing Is Already WorkingDon't Fall Prey to COVID-19 ScammersBeing Chained to Your Desk Might Harm Your ThyroidWhat You Should Know If Your Surgery Has Been Put on HoldAnother Coronavirus Health Threat: Too Few Asthma InhalersOdds of Hospitalization, Death With COVID-19 Rise Steadily With Age: StudyAHA News: Health Emergency? Don't Hesitate to Get HelpToo Many Patients, Too Few Ventilators: How U.S. Hospitals Cope With COVID-19AI Might Spot Which COVID-19 Patients Are at Risk of Severe DiseaseWhat Dental Offices Are Doing to Prevent Coronavirus Infection?A Parent's Guide to Fighting Coronavirus StressTrump Extends Social Distancing to April 30 as COVID-19 Cases SurgeRecovery From Mild Brain Trauma Takes Longer Than Expected: StudyStaying at Home During the Pandemic? Use Technology to Stay ConnectedAHA News: Understanding the Basics of 'Herd Immunity'Multiple Measures of Social Distancing Required to Slow Coronavirus: StudyCough, Fever, Fatigue? Head to CDC's Online Coronavirus Symptom CheckerThree Countries Have Kept Coronavirus in Check; Here's How They Did ItTrial Finds Acupuncture May Help Prevent MigrainesSevere COVID-19 Might Injure the HeartWhy Are Teens, Millennials Ignoring Coronavirus Warnings?An Expert's Guide to Fact-Checking Coronavirus Info OnlineLivestock, Poultry Safe From Coronavirus: ExpertWuhan Study Shows How Social Distancing Is Saving LivesU.S. Hospital Beds Were Already Maxed Out Before Coronavirus PandemicFDA Warns of Defective EpiPen DangersPoll Finds High Anxiety in the Time of CoronavirusCould Robots Be Deployed to Front Line in Fighting COVID-19?COVID-19 May Force Some Cancer Patients to Delay TreatmentWhat People With Parkinson's Need to Know About COVID-19
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Wuhan Study Shows How Social Distancing Is Saving Lives

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Mar 26th 2020

new article illustration

THURSDAY, March 26, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- In a lesson for what can be achieved with social distancing, researchers report that school and workplace closures in Wuhan, China, reduced the number of coronavirus cases there.

And officials are extending those measures until April now instead of March, which could hold off a second wave of cases until later this year, the researchers noted.

Experts say there are vital lessons in the Wuhan experience for the United States and other countries around the world.

"The unprecedented measures the city of Wuhan has put in place to reduce social contacts in school and the workplace have helped to control the outbreak," said study leader Kiesha Prem, from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, in England.

"However, the city now needs to be really careful to avoid prematurely lifting physical-distancing measures, because that could lead to an earlier secondary peak in cases," Prem warned. Instead, "if they relax the restrictions gradually, this is likely to both delay and flatten the peak," he said.

The closures significantly delayed the peak of the epidemic in Wuhan -- the epicenter of the worldwide pandemic -- and gave the health system the time and opportunity to grow and respond to the crisis, according to the study authors.

The researchers used mathematical modeling to simulate the impact of either extending or relaxing current school and workplace closures in Wuhan.

The results showed that by lifting these control measures in March, a second wave of cases may occur in late August. But maintaining these restrictions until April would likely delay a second peak until October.

The study was published March 25 in The Lancet Public Health.

The researchers noted that due to uncertainties about how many people a person with the virus is likely to infect, and how long a person is infected, on average, it's difficult to assess the actual impact of earlier lifting of school and workplace closures in Wuhan.

"Our results won't look exactly the same in another country, because the population structure and the way people mix will be different," said study co-author Yang Liu, also from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine.

"But we think one thing probably applies everywhere: physical-distancing measures are very useful, and we need to carefully adjust their lifting to avoid subsequent waves of infection when workers and school children return to their normal routine," Liu said in a journal news release. "If those waves come too quickly, that could overwhelm health systems."

The study is "crucial for policy makers everywhere," Tim Colbourn, of University College London, wrote in an accompanying journal editorial.

"Given many countries with mounting epidemics now potentially face the first phase of lockdown, safe ways out of the situation must be identified," he wrote. "New COVID-19 country-specific models should incorporate testing, contact tracing and localized quarantine of suspected cases as the main alternative intervention strategy to distancing lockdown measures, either at the start of the epidemic, if it is very small, or after the relaxation of lockdown conditions, if lockdown had to be imposed, to prevent health-care system overload in an already mounting epidemic."

Just this week, President Donald Trump said he wanted to lift stringent social-distancing measures in the United States by Easter, April 12. But during a Tuesday media briefing, he said that he would listen to the advice of public health experts who are constantly analyzing data on the outbreak.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention outlines how to protect yourself from the coronavirus.