611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

LaFrontera
member support line
1-520-279-5737
M-F 5pm-8pm
24/7 weekends/holidays

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Staying at Home During the Pandemic? Use Technology to Stay ConnectedSoaking in a Hot Bath Might Do Your Heart GoodIndoor Athletes Often Lacking in Vitamin DHow Many Steps Per Day to Lengthen Your Life?Can You Buy Happiness? Yes, Study Suggests, If You Spend on ExperiencesAHA News: Coronavirus News on Social Media Stressing You Out? Here's How to Handle the AnxietyDon't Abandon Healthy Eating During Coronavirus PandemicAHA News: 'Be Happy' Isn't So Simple, Especially Amid Coronavirus Worries – But It's Seriously Good for HealthHealthy Living at Home to Ward Off CoronavirusKeeping Coronavirus Anxiety at BaySquat, Don't Sit: Study of African Tribe Shows Why One Position Is HealthierWill a Jolt of Java Get Your Creative Juices Flowing?Get Ready for Clocks to 'Spring Ahead'Erratic Sleep Habits May Boost Risk of Heart Problems: StudyFish Oil May Help Prevent Heart Disease, But Not Cancer: StudyDirty Air Cuts Millions of Lives Short Worldwide: StudyWant to Help Keep Diabetes at Bay? Brush & FlossAre Your Vaccinations Up to Date?Healthy Heart in Your 20s, Healthier Brain Decades LaterMore Than 4 in 10 Americans Are Now Obese: CDCHeading to Work on a Bike? You Might Live LongerIs Your Smartphone or Tablet an Injury Risk?How Safe Is It to Fly?Variety is Key for the Fittest AmericansFor Tracking Steps, Patients Stick With Phones, Not Wearable Devices: StudySocial Media Stokes Myths About Vaccines5 Expert Tips for Preventing Winter Sports AccidentsMany Americans Lack Knowledge, Not Desire, to Eat Plant-Based Diets'Couch Potato' Lifestyle Poses Danger to Women's Hearts5 Secrets to an Allergy-Free Valentine's DayRestful Romance: Smelling Your Lover's Shirt Can Help You SleepHow Does Social Media Shape Your Food Choices?AHA News: How a Happy Relationship Can Help Your HealthTexting While Walking Is Risky BusinessShovel That Snow, but Spare Your BackSpring Time Change Tied to More Fatal Car CrashesHealth Tip: Healthy Ways to Deal With SadnessEating Out: A Recipe for Poor Nutrition, Study FindsHealthy Living Helps Keep the Flu at BayNew Clues Show How Stress May Turn Your Hair GrayHealth Tip: Warning Signs of Drowsy DrivingAHA News: Can Social Media Be Good for Your Health?Sunscreen Chemicals Absorbed Into Body, Study FindsCould a Switch to Skim Milk Add Years to Your Life?Many Americans Are Inactive, With Southerners Faring WorseWhy Tidying Up Is Sometimes Harder Than ExpectedProbiotics: Don't Buy the Online HypePot-Using Drivers Still Impaired After the High Fades'Burnout' Could Raise Your Odds for A-fibHealth Tip: Healthier Ways to Use Social Media
LinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Smoking
Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management

Indoor Athletes Often Lacking in Vitamin D

HealthDay News
by -- Kayla McKiski
Updated: Mar 24th 2020

new article illustration

TUESDAY, March 24, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- Indoor athletes may be vitamin D-deficient, putting themselves at risk of injury and poor performance, a small study finds.

Researchers assessed vitamin D levels in players on George Mason University's men's and women's basketball teams. For the 2018-2019 season, players were given a supplement with a high dose, low dose or no vitamin D.

Vitamin D is essential for building and maintaining healthy bones. Without it, bones can weaken, leading to diseases like osteoporosis.

It's found in many foods, including dairy products and dark, leafy greens, as well as in sunlight.

"Many athletes are now engaging in supplementation, and we don't currently know what the optimal or safe amount of supplementation may be," said study co-author Sina Gallo, assistant professor of nutrition and food studies at George Mason in Fairfax, Va.

Gallo noted that other investigators have reported data from older, non-athletic populations.

"Because athletes may not get the necessary vitamin D through natural dietary sources, supplementation offers a safe, affordable, efficacious method to combat deficiencies," she said in a university news release. "This may be particularly beneficial for athletes living at higher latitudes during the winter months."

Working with Mayo Clinic researchers, her team analyzed the athletes' body composition, skin pigmentation, sun exposure, dietary intake and blood.

They found that 13 of the 20 athletes -- 65% -- were "vitamin D-insufficient" at the outset.

Co-author Margaret Jones said that's consistent with another study that reported 56% of 2,000 athletes in nine countries had low vitamin D levels. Jones is a sports scientist at the university's Frank Pettrone Center for Sports Performance.

Additionally, study participants with darker skin pigmentation showed a higher risk of vitamin D insufficiency at baseline.

Study co-author Andrew Jagim, a sports medicine researcher with the Mayo Clinic Health System in Onalaska, Wisc., said though the study was small, it offers more evidence of the high prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency among college basketball players.

"We, as authors, agree that a larger sample is warranted to aid in the development of screening protocols which will enable medical and sports nutrition staff around the country to identify key risk factors of athletes becoming vitamin D-deficient," he said in a news release.

The study was recently published in the journal Nutrients.

More information

The National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements has more on vitamin D.