611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

LaFrontera
member support line
1-520-279-5737
M-F 5pm-8pm
24/7 weekends/holidays

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
AHA News: Health Emergency? Don't Hesitate to Get HelpToo Many Patients, Too Few Ventilators: How U.S. Hospitals Cope With COVID-19AI Might Spot Which COVID-19 Patients Are at Risk of Severe DiseaseWhat Dental Offices Are Doing to Prevent Coronavirus Infection?A Parent's Guide to Fighting Coronavirus StressTrump Extends Social Distancing to April 30 as COVID-19 Cases SurgeRecovery From Mild Brain Trauma Takes Longer Than Expected: StudyStaying at Home During the Pandemic? Use Technology to Stay ConnectedAHA News: Understanding the Basics of 'Herd Immunity'Multiple Measures of Social Distancing Required to Slow Coronavirus: StudyCough, Fever, Fatigue? Head to CDC's Online Coronavirus Symptom CheckerThree Countries Have Kept Coronavirus in Check; Here's How They Did ItTrial Finds Acupuncture May Help Prevent MigrainesSevere COVID-19 Might Injure the HeartWhy Are Teens, Millennials Ignoring Coronavirus Warnings?An Expert's Guide to Fact-Checking Coronavirus Info OnlineLivestock, Poultry Safe From Coronavirus: ExpertWuhan Study Shows How Social Distancing Is Saving LivesU.S. Hospital Beds Were Already Maxed Out Before Coronavirus PandemicFDA Warns of Defective EpiPen DangersPoll Finds High Anxiety in the Time of CoronavirusCould Robots Be Deployed to Front Line in Fighting COVID-19?COVID-19 May Force Some Cancer Patients to Delay TreatmentWhat People With Parkinson's Need to Know About COVID-19How to Weather Social Isolation During Coronavirus PandemicCOVID-19 Infection Likely Worse for Vapers, SmokersWhen Arteries Narrow, Chest Pain Can Come Earlier for Women Than MenLoss of Sense of Smell Could Be Early Sign of Coronavirus InfectionMany Drugs Already Approved by FDA May Have Promise Against COVID-19The Other Side of COVID-19: Milder Cases, Healthy RecoveryAs Coronavirus Myths Multiply, Experts Sort Fact From FictionA Third of Americans Ordered to Stay at Home; Summer Olympics Postponed for One YearWeight-Loss Surgery May Cut Risk of Heart Attack, StrokeFDA Warns Americans to Beware of Fake COVID-19 Test KitsTaking Steroids for Rheumatoid Arthritis, IBD? Your Odds for Hypertension May RiseWhat Does a Self-Quarantine Look Like?National Guard Activated in 3 States as U.S. Coronavirus Cases Top 34,000U.S. Coronavirus Cases Pass 26,000, With 1 in 4 Americans Under 'Shelter-in-Place' OrdersRaking Your Leaves to the Edge of Your Yard an Invitation to TicksNew Drug Helps Shrink Inoperable Tumors in KidsCoronavirus Crisis Should Put Elective Surgeries on Hold, Doctors' Group SaysAlmost Half of Coronavirus Patients Have Digestive SymptomsNearly 40% of Hospitalizations in U.S. COVID-19 Cases Involve Adults Under 55Healthy Living at Home to Ward Off CoronavirusWhat You Need to Know About Coronavirus If You Have AsthmaStudy Suggests COVID-19 Might Follow Seasonal PatternTrump Signs Massive Relief Package Into Law as U.S. Coronavirus Cases Reach 10,000AHA News: A Look at Allergies and Heart Health, With Tips to Endure Pollen Season Amid Coronavirus FearsNew Coronavirus Wasn't Made in a Lab, Genomic Study ShowsWho's Most at Risk From Coronavirus?
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Coronavirus Death Toll Tops 1,000, While 13th U.S. Case Confirmed

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Feb 11th 2020

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Feb. 11, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- More than 1,000 deaths and close to 43,000 illnesses have now been confirmed in the coronavirus outbreak that continues to rage in China, while a 13th U.S. case was reported late Monday.

Those totals far exceed the toll of the 2003 SARS outbreak, in which 8,098 were infected and 774 died worldwide, the Associated Press reported.

The latest American case involved one of the hundreds of evacuees who were sent to four military bases and quarantined in the past two weeks. That patient is now in isolation in a hospital near March Air Reserve Base in San Diego, the Associated Press reported.

Meanwhile, the first group of 195 evacuees, who were flown out of Wuhan, China, on Jan. 29, have been cleared from their quarantine, the AP reported. More than 500 Americans who were evacuated last Thursday remain under quarantine, the news service said.

But the United States isn't the only place where Americans are under quarantine or infected in the coronavirus outbreak.

A total of 23 Americans onboard a quarantined cruise ship in Japan have also tested positive for the virus, according to the AP. So far, a total of 136 passengers on the Diamond Princess, docked in Yokohama, Japan, have confirmed illness and 600 of the 3,711 passengers have requested medications.

Late last week, a 60-year-old man living in Wuhan, China, became the first American citizen to die from the new coronavirus that first surfaced in that Chinese city.

The man, whose name has not been disclosed, died last Thursday at Jinyintian Hospital in Wuhan, the U.S. Embassy in China said Saturday.

It's not clear why the man was not able to leave Wuhan on one of a number of U.S. State Department evacuation flights that brought hundreds of Americans to the United States over the past week, but he may have already been too ill to fly.

Last week, the United States began to bar entry to any foreigners who have recently traveled to China. U.S. citizens who have recently traveled to the Hubei province of China, where Wuhan, the epicenter of the outbreak, is located, will be quarantined for up to 14 days, U.S. health officials said. U.S. citizens who have recently traveled to other parts of China will face health screenings and voluntary quarantines of up to 14 days.

Many U.S. citizens have already fled China. Over the past two weeks, five flights have evacuated a total of about 840 Americans from China, according to the U.S. State Department.

"The measures we are taking may not catch every single returning traveler with this novel coronavirus, given the nature of this virus and how it's spreading," Dr. Nancy Messonnier, director of the U.S. National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said during a media briefing last week. "But if we can catch the majority of them, that will slow the entry of this virus into the United States."

Meanwhile, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced recently that it had fast-tracked a test for the virus in an effort to help speed screening efforts.

"Today, the test kits will start shipping to over 100 U.S. public health labs," Messonnier said during a media briefing last week. "Initially, 200 test kits will be distributed to U.S. domestic laboratories, and another 200 will be distributed to selected international laboratories. Each test kit can perform 700 to 800 patient samples."

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the U.S. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said the American actions were taken because there are "a lot of unknowns" surrounding the virus and its transmission path, the New York Times reported.

"The number of cases have steeply inclined with every day," Fauci noted.

The temporary entry ban applies to foreign nationals, with the exception of relatives of citizens and permanent residents.

The World Health Organization has already declared the new coronavirus outbreak an international public health emergency, and the agency announced Tuesday it will be gathering experts from around the world for a meeting on how to fast-track medicines and vaccines to try to stem the outbreak.

Experts fear the outbreak could become a pandemic, where there are outbreaks on more than one continent.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on the new coronavirus.