611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Sticking With Meds Lowers Lupus Patients' Diabetes RiskU.S. Coronavirus Cases Now Stand at 26, South Korea Fights to Stem Spike in CasesAHA News: Research Opens New Avenues to Reduce Foot, Toe AmputationsYour Best Bet Against Heart Attack, Stroke? Lower Blood PressureLung Diseases on the Rise WorldwideNew China Coronavirus Cases Decline, 2 Passengers From Affected Cruise Ship DieAHA News: What Women Need to Know About Breast Cancer and Heart DiseaseU.S. Scientists Take Key Step Towards Towards Coronavirus VaccineQuarantine Ends on Cruise Ship in Japan as Coronavirus Cases Near 75,000AHA News: Race and Gender May Tip the Scales on Traditional Stroke Risk FactorsMeasles Complications Can Affect Every Organ: StudyBabies' Exposure to Household Cleaning Products Tied to Later Asthma RiskCoronavirus: Are U.S. Hospitals Prepared?14 Americans From Cruise Ship Hit By Coronavirus Test Positive for InfectionHot Chocolate Could Help Ease Painful Clogged Leg VesselsAntiviral Drug, Plasma Transfusions Show Promise in Treating CoronavirusHow to Dispel Your Child's Fears About the New CoronavirusCholesterol Drugs Might Help Curb 'High-Risk' Prostate CancersCoronavirus Spreads Most Easily When Patients Are Sickest: CDCWill Brushing and Flossing Protect You Against Stroke?Young Black Adults More Prone to Stroke, but Don't Know ItAHA News: Stroke Rates Down for Mexican Americans, Up for White AdultsCoronavirus Cases, Deaths Rise Sharply, While 2 New Cases Reported in U.S.Scientists Spot Antibody That Might Help Diagnose, Treat Autoimmune DisordersCoronavirus in America: Keep Your Panic in CheckCoronavirus Spread Slows, But Death Toll Jumps to 1,113Growing Up in U.S. 'Stroke Belt' Bad for the Brain Later in LifeShingles Vaccine Bonus: Reduced Risk of Stroke?Air Pollution Made in One State Can Cause Deaths in OthersWere You Born in an H1N1 Flu Year or an H3N2? It MattersStricter Clean Air Laws Could Save Thousands of Lives a Year: StudyCoronavirus Fears Have U.S. Pharmacies Running Out of Face MasksCoronavirus Death Toll Tops 1,000, While 13th U.S. Case ConfirmedMeds May Not Prevent Migraines in KidsHigh Testosterone Levels Have Different Health Impact for Men and WomenCoronavirus Cases Top 40,000, While Deaths Hit 908With Macular Degeneration, 1 Missed Visit to Eye Doc Can Mean Vision LossHundreds Suspected, 12 Confirmed: How CDC Identified U.S. Coronavirus CasesFor Patients on Blood Thinners, GI Bleeding May Signal Colon Cancer: StudyStudy Finds 'No Clear Rationale' for 45% of Antibiotic PrescriptionsThere's a Virus Spreading in U.S. That's Killed 10,000: The FluSome U.S. Workers Are Bringing Toxins Home to Their KidsAHA News: Expert Heart Advice for Rare Genetic Muscle Disorder9/11 Study Shows PTSD Tied to Earlier DeathWorkers With Cluster Headaches Take Twice as Many Sick DaysMore Americans to Be Evacuated From China; 12th Coronavirus Case ReportedYoung-Onset Parkinson's May Start in the Womb, New Research SuggestsHealthy Habits Can Slide After Starting Heart MedicationsWide Variations Found in 'Normal' Resting Heart RateLab Discovery Offers Promise for Treating Multiple Sclerosis
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Two More Heartburn Meds Recalled Due to Possible Carcinogen

HealthDay News
by -- E.J. Mundell
Updated: Jan 10th 2020

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Jan. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is adding to a list of recalled lots of popular heartburn medications -- including generic forms of Zantac -- because the pills might contain small amounts of a suspected carcinogen.

The substance, called N-Nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), is an environmental contaminant that can be found in water and foods and has been classified as a "probable human carcinogen" by the World Health Organization.

The presence of NDMA in minute quantities has already led to the recall of multiple types of blood pressure medications, such as valsartan and losartan.

NDMA's potential presence in Zantac and generic versions of the drug were first announced in September.

The new recalls were announced Thursday by the FDA and include "all quantities and lots" of ranitidine hydrochloride capsules manufactured by Appco Pharma in the 150 milligram (mg) and 300 mg size with expiration dates of April/May 2021; and "all unexpired lots," in the same dosages, of ranitidine tablets manufactured by Northwind Pharmaceuticals. Neither company has yet received any reports of "adverse events" tied to the medicines.

Ranitidine decreases the amount of acid created by the stomach. Over-the-counter ranitidine is approved to prevent and relieve heartburn, and prescription ranitidine is approved for a number of uses, including treatment and prevention of ulcers of the stomach and intestines, and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Speaking at the time of the initial Zantac recall, one gastroenterologist said patients may want to switch their meds.

"Drug impurities remain a major national concern," said Dr. David Robbins, associate chief of endoscopy at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City. "While Zantac may prove safe in the long run, this latest statement adds confusion and concern, so my interim advice to patients is simple: switch to another drug… and, of course, confirm with your doctor the need for an antacid."

In the meantime, scientists at one California lab believe they may be getting closer to understanding why NDMA is showing up in ranitidine tablets.

"What we found out was that NDMA is being generated as a result of heating of ranitidine," chemist Ron Najafi, of Emery Lab, told CBS News.

His team found that, at room temperature, NDMA levels in tablets remain at about 25 nanograms -- far below the threshold level of 96 nanograms that's deemed unsafe by the FDA.

But heat changes that. When a pill was heated to 158 degrees Fahrenheit, NDMA levels rose to 142 nanograms.

"So if someone were to keep their ranitidine, Zantac, in their car, for example, and in the middle of summertime, that product is going to get heated up and it's going to generate this compound," Najafi told CBS. "So NDMA in this case… is not an impurity in the drug, it's being formed from the drug itself."

Najafi suspects that ranitidine tablets might be exposed to ambient heat somewhere in the long transport process between manufacturing plants and drugstore shelves.

The Emery lab has submitted their findings to the FDA and is advocating that pills be shipped under controlled temperatures.

Dr. Janet Woodcock, who directs drug evaluation and research at the FDA, responded to the lab results.

It does appear that some NDMA can form with significant heat, she told CBS. "However, these are pretty high temperatures, so the question about whether ranitidine would need to be kept cold to keep it from converting is something that still hasn't been answered," she added.

In the meantime, Woodcock stressed that at the levels found in recalled pills, the risk to users remains very small.

"For most of these contaminants that we're talking about, the level of NDMA -- or nitrosamine -- in there is not much more than your daily diet, especially if you ate a lot of meat," Woodcock said.

More information

The U.S. Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry has more on NDMA.