611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Study Casts Doubt on Use of Common Heart Failure Drugs'Mobile Stroke Units' Help Rush Treatment to PatientsDistracted by Their Smartphones, Pedestrians Are Landing in the ERVaping May Have Triggered Lung Illness Typically Only Seen in MetalworkersMore Than 100 E. Coli Illnesses Now Linked to Romaine LettuceLow-Dose Aspirin Might Cut Cancer Risk, Especially for Overweight PeopleEspecially in the Young, Cholesterol Is No Friend to the HeartAre E-Scooters a Quick Ticket to the ER?Uncontrolled Asthma a Danger to Pregnant Women, BabiesHealth Tip: Common Causes of Knee PainSome Cities' Smog Can Ruin Your VacationParkinson's Treatment Has Unexpected Side EffectHeart Attack at 44 Helped Her Realize Diabetes' DangersCleaner Teeth, Healthier Heart?Obesity Might Weaken Some Drugs' Effectiveness Against AFibHow to Prevent Holiday HeadachesAir Pollution May Up Glaucoma RiskHealth Tip: Causes of Stomach UlcersHealth Tip: Treating ShinglesLeg Pain Could Spell Peripheral Artery Disease for SomeEven in Small Doses, Air Pollution Harms Older AmericansDon't Let Allergies Spoil Your HolidaysGot Chronic Heartburn? Easy Does It During the Thanksgiving FeastAHA News: Flu Prevention Strategies Beyond Getting a Shot and Washing Your HandsUltrasound Treatment Might Ease Parkinson's TremorsPopular Heartburn Drugs May Up Odds of Stomach BugGunshot Wounds Have Long-Term Health Consequences: StudyU.S. Poison Centers Field More Calls About Psychoactive Substances: StudyMore E. coli Illnesses Linked to Tainted Romaine LettuceFDA Approves First System to Insert Ear Tubes Under Local AnesthesiaFDA Approves Oxbryta for Treatment of Sickle Cell DiseaseWhere 'Superbugs' Lurk in Your Home - and How to Stop ThemPlay It Safe With Holiday FoodsCaffeine, Cough Medicines: What's in the Average Blood TransfusionVitamin E Compound Likely Culprit Behind Vaping Lung Illnesses, Study FindsDramatic Rise in Eye Injuries From BB and Paintball GunsObesity May Change the Teen Brain, MRI Study ShowsDon't Eat Romaine Lettuce Grown in Salinas, Calif., Due to E. Coli: FDAMusic Career Might Bring Ringing in the EarsBacteria Could Be Weapon Against Mosquito-Borne DengueHealth Tip: Five Common First-Aid MythsInfants May Not Be as Immune to Measles as ThoughtDoctors Spot a New, Severe Lung Illness Tied to VapingAHA News: Obesity, Other Factors May Speed Up Brain AgingPackaged Caesar Salad Suspected as Possible Source in E. coli OutbreakUltrasound May Ease Common Form of Hand TremorHealth Tip: Preventing and Treating ChickenpoxStudy Spots Ties Between Rheumatoid Arthritis, Other DiseasesRecalls of Blood Pressure Med Took Toll on Patients' HealthAHA News: Bacteria in Your Spit Might Play a Role in Heart Disease
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

How to Prevent Holiday Headaches

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Nov 30th 2019

new article illustration

SATURDAY, Nov. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The holiday season can give you real headaches, but you can take action to prevent them, an expert says.

To reduce stress, make plans well in advance and know your limits, advised Dr. Bing Liao, a neurologist at Houston Methodist.

"The nature of the holiday season already increases stress levels, so finding small ways to reduce schedule stress can help ward off a headache," Liao said in a hospital news release. "This can mean planning well in advance to avoid the hassle of making last minute travel plans, or deciding not to attend a party at the end of a long day."

Be sure you have an adequate supply or a refill of your prescription medications before the holidays, she advised. Missing doses or cutting back could trigger a headache or even serious side effects.

"Don't binge anything during the holidays -- food, alcohol, or television," Liao said. "We all know how a hangover can affect the brain, but most don't realize that overeating can also trigger a headache. And having the next day off from work doesn't mean you should stay up late watching holiday movies. The brain needs the same amount of sleep during the holidays as it does the rest of the year, so stick with your usual bedtime."

Running holiday errands can lead to skipped meals and dehydration, which can trigger headaches. Keep a protein bar and a bottle of water in your bag or in the car, Liao recommended.

It's also important to maintain your normal caffeine intake, she said. A sudden increase or decrease in caffeine can trigger headaches.

"If you already exercise regularly, then keep it up during the holidays even if you have to settle for a shorter workout," Liao said. "If you rarely exercise, try to fit in a 20-minute walk three to four times a week." She noted that exercise helps reduce holiday stress and weight gain, and keeps the brain and heart healthy.

Know and avoid your headache triggers, she concluded. For example, a hot crowded room, outdoor activities, and certain foods such as chocolate or artificial sweeteners, are headache triggers for some people, Liao noted.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more on headache.