611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Study Casts Doubt on Use of Common Heart Failure Drugs'Mobile Stroke Units' Help Rush Treatment to PatientsDistracted by Their Smartphones, Pedestrians Are Landing in the ERVaping May Have Triggered Lung Illness Typically Only Seen in MetalworkersMore Than 100 E. Coli Illnesses Now Linked to Romaine LettuceLow-Dose Aspirin Might Cut Cancer Risk, Especially for Overweight PeopleEspecially in the Young, Cholesterol Is No Friend to the HeartAre E-Scooters a Quick Ticket to the ER?Uncontrolled Asthma a Danger to Pregnant Women, BabiesHealth Tip: Common Causes of Knee PainSome Cities' Smog Can Ruin Your VacationParkinson's Treatment Has Unexpected Side EffectHeart Attack at 44 Helped Her Realize Diabetes' DangersCleaner Teeth, Healthier Heart?Obesity Might Weaken Some Drugs' Effectiveness Against AFibHow to Prevent Holiday HeadachesAir Pollution May Up Glaucoma RiskHealth Tip: Causes of Stomach UlcersHealth Tip: Treating ShinglesLeg Pain Could Spell Peripheral Artery Disease for SomeEven in Small Doses, Air Pollution Harms Older AmericansDon't Let Allergies Spoil Your HolidaysGot Chronic Heartburn? Easy Does It During the Thanksgiving FeastAHA News: Flu Prevention Strategies Beyond Getting a Shot and Washing Your HandsUltrasound Treatment Might Ease Parkinson's TremorsPopular Heartburn Drugs May Up Odds of Stomach BugGunshot Wounds Have Long-Term Health Consequences: StudyU.S. Poison Centers Field More Calls About Psychoactive Substances: StudyMore E. coli Illnesses Linked to Tainted Romaine LettuceFDA Approves First System to Insert Ear Tubes Under Local AnesthesiaFDA Approves Oxbryta for Treatment of Sickle Cell DiseaseWhere 'Superbugs' Lurk in Your Home - and How to Stop ThemPlay It Safe With Holiday FoodsCaffeine, Cough Medicines: What's in the Average Blood TransfusionVitamin E Compound Likely Culprit Behind Vaping Lung Illnesses, Study FindsDramatic Rise in Eye Injuries From BB and Paintball GunsObesity May Change the Teen Brain, MRI Study ShowsDon't Eat Romaine Lettuce Grown in Salinas, Calif., Due to E. Coli: FDAMusic Career Might Bring Ringing in the EarsBacteria Could Be Weapon Against Mosquito-Borne DengueHealth Tip: Five Common First-Aid MythsInfants May Not Be as Immune to Measles as ThoughtDoctors Spot a New, Severe Lung Illness Tied to VapingAHA News: Obesity, Other Factors May Speed Up Brain AgingPackaged Caesar Salad Suspected as Possible Source in E. coli OutbreakUltrasound May Ease Common Form of Hand TremorHealth Tip: Preventing and Treating ChickenpoxStudy Spots Ties Between Rheumatoid Arthritis, Other DiseasesRecalls of Blood Pressure Med Took Toll on Patients' HealthAHA News: Bacteria in Your Spit Might Play a Role in Heart Disease
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Even in Small Doses, Air Pollution Harms Older Americans

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Nov 28th 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Nov. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Even a little exposure to the fine particles of air pollution can translate into higher hospitalization rates for a number of common conditions among older Americans, a new study suggests.

"The study shows that the health dangers and economic impacts of air pollution are significantly larger than previously understood," said study author Yaguang Wei, a doctoral candidate at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, in Boston.

For the study, researchers analyzed data on more than 95 million inpatient hospital claims for Medicare beneficiaries, aged 65 and older, from 2000 to 2012. They also assessed levels of fine particulate air pollution (PM2.5) in the patients' ZIP codes.

Sources of PM2.5 include motor vehicles, coal-fired power plants and wildfires.

Short-term exposure to PM2.5 was linked with hospitalizations for common conditions such as septicemia (serious bloodstream infection), fluid and electrolyte disorders, kidney failure, urinary tract infections, and skin and tissue infections.

The researchers also confirmed previously identified associations between short-term PM2.5 exposure and hospitalization for a number of other conditions, including heart and lung diseases, Parkinson's disease and diabetes.

Each 1 µg/m3 increase in short-term exposure to PM2.5 was associated with an annual increase of nearly 5,700 hospitalizations, over 32,000 days in the hospital, and 634 deaths. That resulted in $100 million in inpatient and post-acute care costs, and $6.5 billion in "value of statistical life," a measure of the economic value of lives lost.

All of the associations remained consistent even when daily PM2.5 levels were below the World Health Organization air quality guideline, according to the study published online Nov. 27 in the BMJ.

"These results raise awareness of the continued importance of assessing the impact of air pollution exposure," study principal investigator Francesca Dominici, a professor of biostatistics at the school, said in the news release.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on particle pollution.