611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Study Casts Doubt on Use of Common Heart Failure Drugs'Mobile Stroke Units' Help Rush Treatment to PatientsDistracted by Their Smartphones, Pedestrians Are Landing in the ERVaping May Have Triggered Lung Illness Typically Only Seen in MetalworkersMore Than 100 E. Coli Illnesses Now Linked to Romaine LettuceLow-Dose Aspirin Might Cut Cancer Risk, Especially for Overweight PeopleEspecially in the Young, Cholesterol Is No Friend to the HeartAre E-Scooters a Quick Ticket to the ER?Uncontrolled Asthma a Danger to Pregnant Women, BabiesHealth Tip: Common Causes of Knee PainSome Cities' Smog Can Ruin Your VacationParkinson's Treatment Has Unexpected Side EffectHeart Attack at 44 Helped Her Realize Diabetes' DangersCleaner Teeth, Healthier Heart?Obesity Might Weaken Some Drugs' Effectiveness Against AFibHow to Prevent Holiday HeadachesAir Pollution May Up Glaucoma RiskHealth Tip: Causes of Stomach UlcersHealth Tip: Treating ShinglesLeg Pain Could Spell Peripheral Artery Disease for SomeEven in Small Doses, Air Pollution Harms Older AmericansDon't Let Allergies Spoil Your HolidaysGot Chronic Heartburn? Easy Does It During the Thanksgiving FeastAHA News: Flu Prevention Strategies Beyond Getting a Shot and Washing Your HandsUltrasound Treatment Might Ease Parkinson's TremorsPopular Heartburn Drugs May Up Odds of Stomach BugGunshot Wounds Have Long-Term Health Consequences: StudyU.S. Poison Centers Field More Calls About Psychoactive Substances: StudyMore E. coli Illnesses Linked to Tainted Romaine LettuceFDA Approves First System to Insert Ear Tubes Under Local AnesthesiaFDA Approves Oxbryta for Treatment of Sickle Cell DiseaseWhere 'Superbugs' Lurk in Your Home - and How to Stop ThemPlay It Safe With Holiday FoodsCaffeine, Cough Medicines: What's in the Average Blood TransfusionVitamin E Compound Likely Culprit Behind Vaping Lung Illnesses, Study FindsDramatic Rise in Eye Injuries From BB and Paintball GunsObesity May Change the Teen Brain, MRI Study ShowsDon't Eat Romaine Lettuce Grown in Salinas, Calif., Due to E. Coli: FDAMusic Career Might Bring Ringing in the EarsBacteria Could Be Weapon Against Mosquito-Borne DengueHealth Tip: Five Common First-Aid MythsInfants May Not Be as Immune to Measles as ThoughtDoctors Spot a New, Severe Lung Illness Tied to VapingAHA News: Obesity, Other Factors May Speed Up Brain AgingPackaged Caesar Salad Suspected as Possible Source in E. coli OutbreakUltrasound May Ease Common Form of Hand TremorHealth Tip: Preventing and Treating ChickenpoxStudy Spots Ties Between Rheumatoid Arthritis, Other DiseasesRecalls of Blood Pressure Med Took Toll on Patients' HealthAHA News: Bacteria in Your Spit Might Play a Role in Heart Disease
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Infants May Not Be as Immune to Measles as Thought

HealthDay News
by By Elizabeth Heubeck
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Nov 21st 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Nov. 21, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- A surprising new study upends the notion that antibodies passed from mother to fetus protect infants from measles for as much as a year.

In fact, infants' immunity wanes much more rapidly than once thought, researchers report in the December issue of Pediatrics. The finding drives home the importance of community-wide immunizations.

"Measles is a serious disease, particularly among infants. Not only do they have a higher risk of infection, but also complications and hospitalizations. They're also most vulnerable to death," said senior study author Shelly Bolotin, a scientist at Public Health Ontario, in Toronto, Canada.

For the study, the researchers tested blood samples from 196 infants under 12 months of age to determine the presence of measles antibodies. The results were unexpected.

In their first month of life, 20% lacked sufficient antibodies to protect against the highly contagious virus, the study found. At 3 months, 92% had antibody levels below the protective threshold. By 6 months, none had antibodies at levels that could protect against measles.

Typically, babies have been presumed to be immune to measles for a year due to their mothers' antibodies.

The authors attributed the quicker-than-expected loss of immunity to the type of protection received in the womb from their mothers.

Measles has been eliminated since 1998 in Canada, where the study took place. As such, mothers in the study probably got their protection from a shot and not through a previous infection, which may produce more antibodies. Nor would the mothers' immunity have been boosted from measles circulating in the community.

"This study really underscores the need to protect infants in the first year of life," Bolotin said.

Measles -- a serious viral disease whose initial symptoms include a rash and fever -- is highly contagious, especially among very young children. Though rare, complications -- including pneumonia, hearing loss and death -- are most common among vulnerable populations, such as infants, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

In 2000, the CDC declared measles eradicated in the United States, thanks largely to a nationwide vaccination program. But the disease is present in other countries, and unvaccinated visitors sometimes bring the virus with them. That happened earlier this year, sparking repeated outbreaks that threatened the nation's eradication status.

Among the 1,200-plus cases reported during the 2019 outbreaks, the median age of infected individuals was 6. Median means half were younger, half were older. More than 90% of cases occurred in people who were unvaccinated or whose vaccination status was unknown, according to the CDC.

The worst outbreak happened in New York City when visitors from Israel and Europe -- sites of recent outbreaks -- mingled with Orthodox Jewish communities where many were unvaccinated.

While vaccine refusal is most often rooted in parents' religious beliefs, the recent "anti-vaxxer" trend -- popularized by celebrities in the media -- can also influence parents' decisions regarding vaccines. The World Health Organization recently identified vaccine hesitancy as one of the top 10 threats to global health.

Vaccine refusal and hesitancy threaten herd immunity: the community-wide resistance to disease that takes hold when a high proportion of people are vaccinated. Roughly 95% of the population needs to be protected to maintain herd immunity against measles, according to Dr. Sean O'Leary, an expert on pediatric infectious diseases.

"If we maintain a highly vaccinated population, measles outbreaks are not going to be an issue," said O'Leary, an associate professor at University of Colorado School of Medicine, in Aurora. "If measles is not circulating, it would be very rare for a young infant to be exposed to the virus."

That's because herd immunity protects vulnerable individuals, such as infants who are too young to be vaccinated. The CDC recommends babies receive the first of two shots for measles, mumps and rubella starting at 12 months of age.

With the new evidence that immunity from mom wanes sooner than previously thought, why not give babies their shots sooner?

O'Leary explained that even if antibodies from mom are no longer at a protective level, those still present may prevent a live vaccine from working very well. The vaccinated infant might then be unable to ward off measles if exposed, he said.

That's why it's so important that individuals who can get vaccinated against measles, do, experts agree.

"Because it's been eliminated for the better part of two decades, people don't remember measles' devastating effects," said study author Bolotin.

More information

To learn more about measles, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.