611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

LaFrontera
member support line
1-520-279-5737
M-F 5pm-8pm
24/7 weekends/holidays

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction and Types of Depressive DisordersRelated Disorders / ConditionsHistorical and Current UnderstandingsBiology, Psychology and SociologyTreatment - Medication and PsychotherapyAlternative Medicine and Self-Help ResourcesSpecial IssuesReferences
More InformationTestsLatest News
Is the 'Gratitude Movement' Overrated? Study Finds It Has LimitsDepressed Pregnant Women 3 Times More Likely to Turn to PotAHA News: Stroke Survivors Might Need Better Screening for DepressionGeneral Anesthesia Boosts Postpartum Depression Risk After C-Section: StudyAI May Help Guide Patients to Most Effective AntidepressantOnline Bullies Make Teen Depression, PTSD Even Worse: SurveyFacebook Falls Short for College Kids Battling Depression, Study FindsPeople With Depression Are Turning to Pot for Relief: StudyDifferences Found in Brains of Kids Born to Depressed ParentsOne-Third of Lung Cancer Patients Battle Depression: StudyAnother Downside to Vaping: Higher Odds for DepressionCan You Beat the Blues With 'Downward Dog'?Exercise Can Help Prevent Depression, Even for Those at High RiskWhat Works Best to Treat Depression?Depression Rates Not Budging for Lesbian and Gay TeensDon't Let SAD Get the Better of YouAntidepressants Might Raise Odds for Serious Pregnancy ComplicationDepressed Moms, More Anxious, Troubled Kids?Why You Should Ask to Be Screened for Postpartum DepressionCommon Antidepressants May Work in Unexpected Way: StudyExperimental Drug Works Quickly on Major DepressionExercise Your Blues AwayDepression, Alzheimer's Might Be Part of Same Process in Some Aging Brains: StudyToo Much Social Media a Depression Risk for TeensEasing Depression Can Bring Longer Life to People With DiabetesIs Your Child Depressed or Suicidal? Here Are the Warning SignsPreventive Intervention for Premature Infants EffectiveDepression News Feed
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Anxiety Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Suicide
Addictions: Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Pain Management

Depressed Moms, More Anxious, Troubled Kids?

HealthDay News
by -- Steven Reinberg
Updated: Sep 30th 2019

new article illustration

MONDAY, Sept. 30, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- If a mother is depressed, her young children might be at risk for hyperactivity, aggressiveness and anxiety, a new study suggests.

Interestingly, a father's depression only affected kids if mom was also depressed, the researchers found.

"Depression among parents both during and after pregnancy not only affects the person suffering from depression but also has a long-term impact on the well-being of the newborn child," said researcher Johanna Pietikainen, from the Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare.

"Even in cases of mild depression, it is important that the symptoms are identified and the parents are offered support as early as possible, if necessary … during the pregnancy," she added.

One parent's depression also puts the other parent at risk. Symptoms of depression can start during pregnancy and continue after the child's first birthday, the researchers noted.

The findings were published Sept. 30 in the CMAJ.

"It is important to monitor the mental well-being of both parents during pregnancy and after the birth of the child, and if one parent shows symptoms of depression then the symptoms of the other parent should also be examined," Pietikainen said in a news release from the National Institute for Health and Welfare, in Finland.

Long-term depression indicated that depression occurred before the pregnancy. Previous depression was a key risk factor for moderate or severe depressive symptoms, the study authors said.

Other risk factors for depression included sleep deprivation during pregnancy, stress, anxiety and a bad family environment. These risk factors predicted depression for both mothers and fathers.

More information

For more on depression and pregnancy, visit the March of Dimes.