611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Cancer
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
High-Dose Radiation a Game Changer in Fighting Deadly Prostate CancerAt-Risk Men May Also Benefit From Regular MammogramsDoubt Over Long-Term Use of Hormone Rx for Recurrent Prostate CancerMost Americans in the Dark About Cancer-Causing HPV, Survey FindsScientists Find Unsafe Levels of Known Carcinogen in Menthol E-CigarettesAHA News: Unique Gene Activity Discovered in People With Both Stroke and CancerLung Cancer Screening Can Detect Other Smoking IllsWhat Is Your Risk for Prostate Cancer?Brain Tumor Patient Used Medical Pot, Landed in ERCancer Drugs Sometimes Work in Unexpected Ways: StudyCancer Patients Turning to Crowdfunding to Help Pay Medical CostsAHA News: Scientists Find Biological Link Between High Blood Pressure and Breast CancerColon Cancer Rates Rising Among the Young in Wealthy NationsPaperwork, High Costs Could Mean Worse Survival for Lung Cancer PatientsCancer Overtakes Heart Disease as #1 Killer of Middle-Aged in Wealthy NationsExercise Is Good Medicine for Advanced Colon CancerCan Breast Cancer Be a Risk Factor for Opioid Use Among Older Patients?Childhood Cancer Survivors Struggle With Heart TroublesDrug Offers Hope Against a Tough-to-Treat Blood CancerMore Antibiotics, Higher Odds for Colon Cancer?U.S. Task Force Updates Breast Cancer Gene Testing RecommendationsNew Treatments Could Be Powerful Weapons Against Brain TumorsAmerica's Obesity Epidemic May Mean Some Cancers Are Striking SoonerAre You Still Putting Off Colon Cancer Screening?New Study Finds a Family Risk for Blood CancerNew DNA Blood Test May Help Guide Breast Cancer TreatmentDespite Cancer Screening, 'Oldest Old' Have Low Survival Odds: StudyRoutine Screening for Pancreatic Cancer Not Warranted, Expert Panel SaysAHA News: Common Prostate Cancer Treatment May Increase Risk of Fatal Heart ConditionFinances Affect Women's Choice of Breast Cancer Treatment: StudyDrug Duo May Be an Advance Against a Common LeukemiaVitamin A Linked to Lower Odds of Common Skin CancerChildhood Cancer Steals Over 11 Million Years of Healthy Life: StudySome of Most Common, Deadly Cancers Get the Least Research MoneyBreast Implants Tied to Rare Cancer RecalledNew Test Can Pinpoint Which Pancreatic Cysts Might Turn CancerousCan a Broken Heart Contribute to Cancer?Hurricanes Can Hurt Survival Odds Among Those With CancerNewer Lung Cancer Screening Saves More LivesSugary Sodas, Juices Tied to Higher Cancer RiskHormone Treatment for Prostate Cancer Linked to Heightened Alzheimer's RiskMillions of Life Years, Billions of Dollars Lost to Cancer Each YearMS Linked to Higher Cancer RiskCancer Risk Rises After Iodine Rx for Overactive Thyroid: StudyEarly Risers May Be a Little Less Likely to Get Breast CancerHPV Vaccine Making Headway Against Cancer-Causing Virus WorldwideNew Urine Test Might Show Whether Prostate Cancer Needs Treatment9/11 Dust Linked to Prostate Cancer in First RespondersBetter Treatments Needed to Boost Brain Cancer Survival: StudyCancer Survivors May Have Lower Odds for Dementia
LinksBook ReviewsSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Pain Management

Cancer Drugs Sometimes Work in Unexpected Ways: Study

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Sep 11th 2019

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 11, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Ten cancer drugs being tested in human clinical trials appear to work -- but not in the ways their developers thought they would, researchers say.

"The idea for many of these drugs is that they block the function of a certain protein in cancer cells. And what we showed is that most of these drugs don't work by blocking the function of the protein that they were reported to block," said study co-leader Jason Sheltzer, a fellow at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York.

The drugs -- being tested on about 1,000 patients -- do appear capable of killing cancer cells, according to the authors of the study published Sept. 11 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

The study arose from work by Sheltzer's lab to identify genes tied to low survival rates among cancer patients. The researchers discovered that a protein called MELK, which is often abundant in tumors, plays no role in cancer growth.

That was a surprise, because dozens of academic papers had identified MELK as essential for a cancer cell's survival. But when Sheltzer's team turned off MELK production using gene-editing technology, this had no impact on cancer cells.

After rechecking their results, the researchers concluded that MELK is not an ideal target for cancer drugs, after all.

At the time, Sheltzer's team warned other researchers that this may be a common problem -- that suspected cancer treatment targets might not actually help drug development.

In order to prove that, they launched this study and identified 10 experimental cancer drugs that do not work in the expected way.

However, learning why they don't work in the expected way can still help efforts to develop new drugs and personalized medicines, the team explained.

"A lot of drugs that get tested in human cancer patients tragically don't end up helping cancer patients," Sheltzer said in a laboratory news release.

However, "if this kind of evidence was routinely collected before drugs entered clinical trials, we might be able to do a better job assigning patients to therapies that are most likely to provide some benefit. With this knowledge, I believe we can better fulfill the promise of precision medicine," he said.

More information

The U.S. National Cancer Institute has more on cancer treatments.