611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Health Tip: Taking a Mental Health DayAre You Just a Worrywart or Is It Something More?Online Learning: What's in It for You?10 Quick Tips for a Healthier, Safer LifeHow to Keep Your Bones Strong and Prevent FracturesHow Your Genes Affect the Number on Your ScaleFitter Bodies Make for Healthier Brains, Study FindsOccasional Naps Do a Heart Good, Swiss Study FindsAHA News: Less TV, More Activity May Mean Extra Years Free of Heart Disease and StrokeDark Skin No Protection Against Sun's Harmful RaysLong-Term 'Couch Potatoes' May Face Double the Odds for Early DeathPersonality Reboots Are Possible, Studies SuggestStaying Optimistic Might Lengthen Your Life, Study ShowsHow to Get on Track When Weekend Eating Is Your DownfallEvery Minute of Exercise Counts When It Comes to LongevityHow Helpful Are Self-Help Programs?City Parks Are a Mood BoosterThe 4 Keys to Emotional Well-BeingDo You Know Your Cardiorespiratory Fitness Level?Are You an 'Extreme Early Bird'?Unplugging From Social Media on Vacation? It's Tough at FirstHow to Kickstart Your CreativityWhat TV Binge-Watching Does to Your BrainGiving Up Meat Could Help Your Health -- And the Planet'sHeart-Healthy Habits Good For Your BrainFast-Food Joints on Your Way to Work? Your Waistline May WidenPlants on Your Plate Will Protect Your Heart3 Ways to Improve Your Eating Habits4 Tips for a Healthier Home4 Personal Items You Probably Should Replace TodayTrees an Oasis of Mental Well-BeingSome Meds and Driving a Dangerous DuoAmericans Are Spending Even More Time Sitting, Study ShowsCan Your Smartphone Make You Fat?Dirty Air Kills 30,000 Americans Each YearWarm Bath Can Send You Off to a Sound Slumber, Study FindsAHA News: Exercise Caution Outdoors in the Summer HeatSunglasses a Shield for the EyesToo Much Smartphone Time May Invite Host of Health WoesThe Happiness Dividend: Longer, Healthier LivesSummer Can Be Hard on Your HearingJust 300 Fewer Calories a Day Brings a Health BenefitCan a Budget Make You Happier?Sleep : The Right Prescription for Your HealthIs Your Mattress Releasing Toxins While You Sleep?Ageism Disappears When Young and Old Spend Time TogetherHow Protect Against Short- and Long-Term Sun DamageHealth Tip: Wear Sunglasses With UV ProtectionHow Are You Feeling? Check Your WristbandSelfie Craze Has Young Americans Viewing Plastic Surgery More Favorably: Study
LinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Smoking
Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management

AHA News: Less TV, More Activity May Mean Extra Years Free of Heart Disease and Stroke


HealthDay News
Updated: Sep 9th 2019

new article illustration

MONDAY, Sept. 9, 2019 (American Heart Association News) -- People who watch less TV and are physically active live more years free of heart disease, according to a new study.

Past research has shown people who are highly physically active tend to live more years free of cardiovascular disease. But researchers of a study published Monday in the Journal of the American Heart Association wanted to look specifically at how TV viewing habits fit into the equation.

Using data from 13,534 people ages 45 to 64, investigators studied three factors – how much TV people generally watched; how often they were physically active in their leisure time; and how long they lived without having a stroke, heart failure or coronary heart disease.

After an average of 27 years, people who were highly active and watched little or no TV lived about two and a half years longer free of stroke, heart failure and coronary heart disease than those who often watched TV and weren't active.

TV watching impacted health regardless of physical activity, the study found. Those who seldom watched or never watched TV lived about a year longer free of each type of cardiovascular disease than those who often watched TV.

"This study suggests that engaging in any physical activity and viewing less TV could help you live more years free of (cardiovascular) disease," said Carmen Cuthbertson, the study's lead author.

"Because there's such a large cardiovascular disease burden in the U.S., we wanted to focus on how to extend the years you live in health," said Cuthbertson, a postdoctoral fellow in the epidemiology department at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The study was limited, she said, by the fact that participants were asked only about "leisure time" activity and not about household chores or physical activity during work or commuting. She said she'd like future studies to incorporate wearable devices to track physical activity and sedentary time.

Bethany Barone Gibbs, a professor of health and physical activity at the University of Pittsburgh who was not involved in the study, applauded the research for focusing not on death, but on how people can live longer lives free of cardiovascular diseases.

While the results don't prove frequent TV watching causes heart disease, she said, its findings help clarify how physical inactivity affects health.

"Studies have shown that people who sit for hours at a time develop various vascular dysfunctions – blood begins pooling in the legs and circulation gets worse, especially in the extremities, which we think causes vascular damage that can lead to the long-term development of heart disease," said Gibbs, vice chair of the American Heart Association's Physical Activity Committee.

"TV watching is just one domain of sedentary behavior, but it's also a really modifiable behavior," she said.

The study began in the late 1980s before smartphones and the internet impacted how long people sit in front of screens, Gibbs said. She called for new in-depth research into how cardiovascular health is affected by overall sitting time as well as binge-watching TV.

"Now, we can sit back and not even have to lift a finger to watch the next show on Netflix," she said. "I think television-watching is becoming an even more important target when it comes to behavior change and reducing our risk of cardiovascular disease."