611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Smoking
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Scientists Find Unsafe Levels of Known Carcinogen in Menthol E-CigarettesCDC Revises Number of Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses to 380 in 36 StatesTrump Pushing for Nationwide Ban on Flavored E-CigarettesAre Hookahs Safer Than Cigarettes? Chemical Study Says No WayWould a Health Warning on Every Cigarette Help Smokers Quit?FDA Warns Juul About Illegal Marketing Claims and Pitch to YouthVaping-Linked Lung Illnesses Double, Vitamin E Acetate Leading SuspectHealth Officials Close in on Culprit in Vaping Lung Injury CasesAs Lung Injury Cases Rise, CDC Says 'Don't Vape'Jumps in Pot Use, Depression and Drinking Threaten Gains Against SmokingLots of Teens Are Breathing in Others' Vaping FumesVaping May Trigger Lung Damage Like That Seen in EmphysemaIn-Store Marketing Helps Get Kids VapingFirst Death Tied to Lung Injury From Vaping Reported in IllinoisCases of Lung Injury Tied to Vaping Keep RisingVaping Constricts Blood Vessels, Raising Heart, Lung ConcernsWhen Does Heart Health Return to Normal After Quitting Smoking?AHA News: Amid 'Epidemic' of School Vaping, a Search for SolutionsFDA Proposes Graphic Warning Labels on CigarettesE-Cig Use Triples Odds That Teens Will Smoke Pot: StudyRaising Legal Smoking Age to 21 WorksFDA Reports More Seizures Among VapersSmoking Creates Long-Lasting Risk for Clogged Leg ArteriesAHA News: Cigarette Smoke in Pregnancy May Impair Healing of Newborns' HeartsSmoking May Interfere With 'Embolization' Lung TreatmentNumber of American Smokers Who've Tried to Quit Has StalledMoney Motivates Smokers to Quit Long Term, Study FindsTough Rules on E-Cigs Might Push Folks Back to Smoking8 in 10 Americans Want Less Nicotine in Cigarettes: CDCFew U.S. Universities Are Smoke-FreeSocial Media a Big Driver of Teen Vaping Craze: StudyAHA News: Who's Helping Smokers Quit? Probably Not Their Heart DoctorYoung Female Smokers at Especially High Heart Risk'Secret Shopper' Study Shows How Easily Teens Can Buy E-CigsAnother Vaping Danger: E-Cigarette Explodes in Teen's FaceGlobal Efforts to Cut Smoking Show Mixed ResultsSheep Study Shows a Stuffy Side Effect of VapingAHA News: Vaping Ignites Legislative Trend to Raise Tobacco Sales Age to 21Cancer Patients Vaping in Growing NumbersVaping May Exact a Toll on Blood Vessel Health2 in 3 Adults Who Use E-Cigs Want to StopUnfiltered Cigarettes Are Most DeadlyVaping Habit Might Make You More Prone to FluNearly Half of Juul Twitter Followers Are Teens, Young Adults: StudyWhen E-Cig Makers Offer Promotional Items, More Teens Likely to VapeQuitting Smoking Helps Shield Women From Bladder Cancer: StudyE-Cigarettes Used in 5% of U.S. Homes With KidsFDA OKs Restricted Sales of 'Heat-Not-Burn' Tobacco DevicesVaping and Smoking May Signal Greater Motivation to QuitMany Smokers Switch to Vaping While Pregnant, But Safety Issues Remain
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Wellness and Personal Development

Lots of Teens Are Breathing in Others' Vaping Fumes

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Aug 28th 2019

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, Aug. 28, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The danger to teenagers' lungs from e-cigarettes isn't only occurring in those who vape: A new report finds many young bystanders are breathing in "secondhand" fumes.

The researchers analyzed data from the U.S. National Youth Tobacco Survey, and found that about one-third of middle and high school students were exposed to vaping aerosols in 2018.

That's an increase of about 30% above the prevalence between 2015 and 2017, when about one in every four kids breathed in secondhand vaping fumes.

The trend is "concerning," because a number of possibly hazardous chemicals are released by e-cigarettes, said study corresponding author Andy Tan. Those chemicals include nicotine, heavy metals, aldehydes, glycerin and flavoring substances, he explained.

"The majority of studies have concluded that passive exposure may pose a health risk to bystanders, particularly vulnerable populations such as children and teens," said Tan. He's an investigator at the Center for Community-Based Research at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, in Boston.

The researchers noted that the rate at which young Americans are breathing in others' vaping fumes is rising despite the fact that 16 states and more than 800 municipalities have recently introduced laws to restrict e-cigarette use in many locations, including schools.

Much of the secondhand exposure is from living with or being around people who use e-cigarettes, Tan's team said. The report was published online Aug. 28 in JAMA Network Open.

Two experts unconnected to the study agreed there's real cause for concern for teens' health.

"The dangers of secondhand cigarette smoke have been well described in recent years, so it comes as no surprise that secondhand 'smoke' from vaping may also cause damage," said Dr. Len Horovitz, a lung specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

He pointed out that for some young bystanders, "asthmatic reactions are common, and with the rising trend of vaping and e-cigarette use, this has become a public health hazard."

Patricia Folan directs the Center for Tobacco Control at Northwell Health in Great Neck, N.Y. She said that "the high concentration of ultra-fine particles in the aerosol can aggravate respiratory symptoms and cause constriction of blood vessels. Due to the chemical composition of the aerosol from some e-cigarette devices, those exposed experience eye, throat and airway irritation. Research has also indicated that exposure to the aerosol from flavored e-cigarettes may cause damage and disease to the lungs."

The study also found that the threat of secondhand smoke from traditional tobacco cigarettes hasn't gone away either. About half the students in the survey reported exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, which is much more dangerous than e-cigarette aerosols, Tan said.

"So we need to make sure that reducing exposure to secondhand smoke is still high on the agenda, along with policies to protect young people from all forms of secondhand exposures," Tan said in a Dana-Farber news release.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse has more about e-cigarettes.