611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Suicide
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
ER Visits for Attempted Suicide Greatly Raise Odds for Future TragedyCould a Concussion Raise a Teen Athlete's Suicide Risk?Media Reports on Celeb Suicides Could Trigger CopycatsCertain Blood Pressure Meds Tied to Suicide Risk in StudyDeaths Due to Suicide, Homicide on the Rise Among U.S. YouthSuicide Attempts Rising Among Black TeensEating Disorders Linked to Suicide RiskAspirin, Antihistamines: Kids Often Use OTC Drugs in Suicide AttemptsMore U.S. Teen Girls Are Victims of Suicide Than Thought, Study FindsVets With Traumatic Brain Injury Have Higher Suicide Risk: StudySuicide Becoming All Too Common in U.S.What Treatments Work Best to Prevent Suicide?Restless Legs Syndrome Might Raise Risk of Suicide, Self-HarmSuicide Rates Soaring Among Black TeensIs Your Child Depressed or Suicidal? Here Are the Warning SignsU.S. Youth Suicide Rate Reaches 20-Year HighEpilepsy DrugTied to Higher Risk of Suicidal Behavior in Young UsersDrug ODs, Suicides Soaring Among Millennials: ReportSoldiers' Odds for Suicide Quadruple When Loaded Gun at HomeKids of Opioid-Using Parents May Be More Likely to Attempt SuicideSuicides Increase Among U.S. Kids, But More in Girls Than BoysScientists Spot Chemical Signs of Suicidal Thoughts in Brains of Those With PTSD'Ringing in the Ears' May Drive Some to the Brink of SuicideOverdose Attempts Skyrocket Among Teens, Young Adults: StudyMigraine Pain Linked to Raised Suicide RiskSuicide Rates Fall When States Raise Minimum Wage: StudySuicidal Behavior Nearly Doubles Among U.S. KidsWhy Men Won't Mention Suicidal Thoughts to Their DoctorU.S. Deaths From Suicide, Substance Abuse Reach Record HighGlobal Rate of Suicide Deaths Is on the DeclineTeens' Odds for Suicide May Triple While in Jail: StudyCancer Diagnosis May Quadruple Suicide RiskParents Often Unaware of Kids' Suicidal ThoughtsSuicide Risk Rises Following Cancer DiagnosisTeen Boys Who Attempt Suicide More Likely to Abuse as AdultsNew National Suicide Statistics at a Glance
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Abuse
Bipolar Disorder
Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Grief & Bereavement Issues
Death & Dying

Restless Legs Syndrome Might Raise Risk of Suicide, Self-Harm

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Aug 23rd 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Aug. 23, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- People with restless legs syndrome (RLS) have nearly three times the risk of suicide and self-harm, which indicates that there may be a link between the physical condition and mental health.

In a new study, Penn State researchers analyzed data on more than 24,000 people with RLS and about 145,000 people without the neurological condition. None had a history of suicide attempts or self-harm.

During the study period, people with RLS had a 2.7-fold higher risk of suicide or self-harm than people without the condition, the findings showed. However, the study could not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

This increased risk remained after researchers controlled for factors such as depression, sleep disorders and common chronic diseases, "meaning RLS could still be an independent variable contributing to suicide and self-harm," said study co-author Muzi Na. She's an assistant professor in the Penn State College of Health and Human Development.

"We still don't know the exact reason, but our results can help shape future research to learn more about the mechanism," Na said in a university news release.

RLS causes uncomfortable sensations in the legs, resulting in the urge to move them, often during the night, and affecting sleep. The condition affects about 5% of the U.S. population.

With U.S. suicide rates on the rise, these findings suggest doctors should pay close attention to the mental health of people with RLS, according to study co-author Xiang Gao, director of the Nutritional Epidemiology Lab at Penn State.

"Our study suggests that restless legs syndrome isn't just connected to physical conditions, but to mental health, as well," Gao said in the news release. "And, with RLS being underdiagnosed and suicide rates rising, this connection is going to be more and more important. Clinicians may want to be careful when they're screening patients both for RLS and suicide risk."

The exact cause of RLS is unknown, but previous studies have identified links between it and iron deficiency, as well as low levels of dopamine in the brain.

RLS also has been linked with a higher risk of early death, but the reasons are unclear. Some studies have found associations between RLS and increased chances of high blood pressure and heart attack, as well as with depression and thoughts of suicide.

The study was published online Aug. 23 in JAMA Network Open.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more on restless legs syndrome.