611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Global Coronavirus Outbreaks Raise Fears of PandemicGlobal Coronavirus Outbreaks Worry Experts, as U.S. Cases Reach 34Sticking With Meds Lowers Lupus Patients' Diabetes RiskU.S. Coronavirus Cases Reach 34: CDCAHA News: Research Opens New Avenues to Reduce Foot, Toe AmputationsYour Best Bet Against Heart Attack, Stroke? Lower Blood PressureLung Diseases on the Rise WorldwideNew China Coronavirus Cases Decline, 2 Passengers From Affected Cruise Ship DieAHA News: What Women Need to Know About Breast Cancer and Heart DiseaseU.S. Scientists Take Key Step Towards Towards Coronavirus VaccineQuarantine Ends on Cruise Ship in Japan as Coronavirus Cases Near 75,000AHA News: Race and Gender May Tip the Scales on Traditional Stroke Risk FactorsMeasles Complications Can Affect Every Organ: StudyBabies' Exposure to Household Cleaning Products Tied to Later Asthma RiskCoronavirus: Are U.S. Hospitals Prepared?14 Americans From Cruise Ship Hit By Coronavirus Test Positive for InfectionHot Chocolate Could Help Ease Painful Clogged Leg VesselsAntiviral Drug, Plasma Transfusions Show Promise in Treating CoronavirusHow to Dispel Your Child's Fears About the New CoronavirusCholesterol Drugs Might Help Curb 'High-Risk' Prostate CancersCoronavirus Spreads Most Easily When Patients Are Sickest: CDCWill Brushing and Flossing Protect You Against Stroke?Young Black Adults More Prone to Stroke, but Don't Know ItAHA News: Stroke Rates Down for Mexican Americans, Up for White AdultsCoronavirus Cases, Deaths Rise Sharply, While 2 New Cases Reported in U.S.Scientists Spot Antibody That Might Help Diagnose, Treat Autoimmune DisordersCoronavirus in America: Keep Your Panic in CheckCoronavirus Spread Slows, But Death Toll Jumps to 1,113Growing Up in U.S. 'Stroke Belt' Bad for the Brain Later in LifeShingles Vaccine Bonus: Reduced Risk of Stroke?Air Pollution Made in One State Can Cause Deaths in OthersWere You Born in an H1N1 Flu Year or an H3N2? It MattersStricter Clean Air Laws Could Save Thousands of Lives a Year: StudyCoronavirus Fears Have U.S. Pharmacies Running Out of Face MasksCoronavirus Death Toll Tops 1,000, While 13th U.S. Case ConfirmedMeds May Not Prevent Migraines in KidsHigh Testosterone Levels Have Different Health Impact for Men and WomenCoronavirus Cases Top 40,000, While Deaths Hit 908With Macular Degeneration, 1 Missed Visit to Eye Doc Can Mean Vision LossHundreds Suspected, 12 Confirmed: How CDC Identified U.S. Coronavirus CasesFor Patients on Blood Thinners, GI Bleeding May Signal Colon Cancer: StudyStudy Finds 'No Clear Rationale' for 45% of Antibiotic PrescriptionsThere's a Virus Spreading in U.S. That's Killed 10,000: The FluSome U.S. Workers Are Bringing Toxins Home to Their KidsAHA News: Expert Heart Advice for Rare Genetic Muscle Disorder9/11 Study Shows PTSD Tied to Earlier DeathWorkers With Cluster Headaches Take Twice as Many Sick DaysMore Americans to Be Evacuated From China; 12th Coronavirus Case ReportedYoung-Onset Parkinson's May Start in the Womb, New Research SuggestsHealthy Habits Can Slide After Starting Heart Medications
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Surgeons Give 13 Paralyzed Adults Hand, Arm Movement

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Jul 5th 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, July 5, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Thirteen paralyzed young adults have regained elbow and hand movement after undergoing complex surgery in Australia, surgeons report.

The patients now brush their hair and teeth, feed themselves and put on makeup -- tasks that were impossible before the "nerve transfer" surgery, the doctors report in the July 4 issue of The Lancet medical journal.

"For people with tetraplegia [paralysis of upper and lower limbs], improvement in hand function is the single most important goal," said study leader Dr. Natasha van Zyl, of Austin Health in Melbourne.

"Stem cells and neuroprostheses could change the landscape of regenerative medicine in the future," noted Dr. Ida Fox of Washington University in St. Louis.

But, "for now, nerve transfers are a cost-effective way to harness the body's innate capability to restore movement in a paralyzed limb," said Fox in an editorial accompanying the new study.

The patients underwent extensive physical therapy after the procedure. Two years out, they are using electronic devices and tools, and handling money and credit cards, according to the report.

The restored elbow movement improved their ability to move their wheelchair and to get into bed or a car, the authors said.

The study included 16 young adults (average age 27) with paralysis of the upper and lower limbs due to spinal cord injuries suffered within the previous 18 months. Most of the injuries occurred in sports or motor vehicle crashes.

The patients underwent single or multiple nerve transfers in one or both arms. Surgeons took nerves from functioning expendable muscles above the spinal injury and attached them to paralyzed muscles below the spinal injury.

Altogether, 59 nerve transfers were completed in 13 men and three women and a total of 27 limbs. In 10 patients, nerve transfers were combined with tendon transfers to improve hand function.

The patients were assessed before surgery, and one and two years afterward. Two patients did not complete the follow-up, and one died of causes unrelated to the surgery.

At the two-year assessment, the patients showed major improvements in the ability to pick up and release objects.

The results suggest that nerve transfers can provide improvements similar to traditional tendon transfers, but with smaller incisions and shorter immobilization times after surgery, according to the researchers.

One hand surgeon who wasn't involved in the trial said these types of operations have been used for years in other contexts.

"Nerve transfers have been used for the past decade for multiple conditions with excellent results," explained Dr. Steven Beldner. He helps direct the New York Hand and Wrist Center at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

This type of surgery appears to work when spinal cord injuries are involved, as well, Bender said. As he explained, "most muscles have multiple nerve branches controlling the same muscle function. [In these surgeries] some of these muscle branches are transferred to other muscles, which have lost their voluntary control due to nerve injury."

However, the Australian team stressed that the operation isn't foolproof. Four nerve transfers failed in three patients, and the researchers said further study is needed to determine which patients are the best candidates for nerve transfer surgery.

"We believe that nerve transfer surgery offers an exciting new option, offering individuals with paralysis the possibility of regaining arm and hand functions to perform everyday tasks, and giving them greater independence and the ability to participate more easily in family and work life," van Zyl said in a journal news release.

"What's more, we have shown that nerve transfers can be successfully combined with traditional tendon transfer techniques to maximize benefits," van Zyl said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more on spinal cord injury.