611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Women's Health
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Some Women Still Getting Pregnant While on Acne Drug Tied to Birth DefectsLonger Rx for Birth Control Pills a Smart Idea for Female Vets: StudyPot Use During Early Pregnancy on the RiseDiabetes Raises Heart Failure Risk More in Women Than MenClues to Why Women Have Higher Odds for Alzheimer'sMenstrual Cups Equal Pads, Tampons in Effectiveness, Data ShowsAHA News: Pregnancy Complications Could Be Early Sign of Heart Disease Risk in Black WomenHigh-Fiber Diets Might Shield Against a Common Pregnancy ComplicationWhy Older Women Have Less Sex: It's Not as Simple as You ThinkPoor Social Life Could Spell Trouble for Older Women's BonesHealth Tip: Reducing PMS SymptomsHealth Tip: IUD Fast FactsAHA News: Summer Heat Brings Special Health Risks for Pregnant WomenWhere a Woman's Fat Lies Hints at Future Heart TroublesHealth Tip: Recognizing a Yeast InfectionEven Slightly Elevated Blood Pressure Early in Pregnancy a Bad SignEarly Risers May Be a Little Less Likely to Get Breast CancerBig Decline Seen in Use of Annual Pelvic Exam by Young WomenCould Antibacterial Triclosan Weaken Women's Bones?Making Sense of Mammography GuidelinesCould 3-D Mammograms Soon Be the Standard for Breast Cancer Screening?FDA Approves Second Drug to Help Women With Low LibidoFew Pregnant Women Get Right Amount of NutrientsHeart Disease Is Lasting Threat to Breast Cancer SurvivorsMore Women Using Pot During Pregnancy, Despite Potential Harms to BabyYour Mom Plays a Role in Age at Menopause, LongevityWhy Do Young Women Get Addicted to Indoor Tanning?Drug Overdoses, Suicide Are Risk for New Mothers: StudyA Healthy Baby Starts With a Healthy MomAHA News: How to Have a Heart-Healthy Pregnancy Before You Even ConceiveBlood From Previously Pregnant Women Is Safe for Donation: StudyBedroom Light at Night Might Boost Women's WeightCommon Supplement Ingredient Could Harm Fetus, FDA WarnsIs MRI Screening Worth It for Breast Cancer Survivors?Obamacare May Have Boosted Fight Against Ovarian CancerNewer Drug Extends Lives of Young Breast Cancer PatientsAHA News: Is It Fatigue -- Or a Stroke? Women Shouldn't Ignore These Warning SignsWomen in Cardiac Arrest Less Likely to Receive Help, Study FindsFertility Treatment Tied to Deadly Heart Problem in Pregnancy: StudyAggressive Uterine Cancer on the Rise, Especially in Blacks: StudyCOPD May Strike Women Harder Than MenWomen With Sleep Apnea May Have Higher Cancer Odds Than MenWhy So Many Older Women Develop UTIsAHA News: Stress From Work, Home Can Harm Women's HeartsBreastfeeding Brings a Heart Bonus for MomLow-Fat Diet Could Be a Weapon Against Breast CancerAHA News: Why Are Women With Diabetes at Greater Risk for Poor Heart Health?Routine Use of Antibiotics May Help After Complicated Vaginal Birth: StudyAre You Running Short on Iron?Weight Before Pregnancy Most Important to Risk for Complications
Questions and AnswersLinksBook ReviewsSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Wellness and Personal Development
Mental Disorders

Drug Overdoses, Suicide Are Risk for New Mothers: Study

HealthDay News
by -- Steven Reinberg
Updated: Jun 18th 2019

new article illustration

TUESDAY, June 18, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Drug overdoses and suicide are common causes of death among women who die within a year of giving birth, a new study finds.

In fact, in the study based on data from California, these two causes accounted for nearly 20% of postpartum deaths from 2010 to 2012.

"These deaths are rare but devastating for families," said study co-author Claire Margerison, an assistant professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at Michigan State University, in East Lansing. "We need to place more emphasis on prevention."

For the study, Margerison and her colleagues analyzed more than 1 million medical records from California hospitals.

While maternal death rates during and after pregnancy are rising nationwide, California is below the national average. Even so, drug overdose was the second-leading cause of death among California women in the first year after giving birth. Suicide ranked seventh.

Suicide and fatal overdoses were more common among white and poor women, the study found.

The data aren't sufficient to identify trends but could inform future studies, the researchers said. The findings, however, might be a sign of what's occurring across the country.

Although maternal death rates have dropped in California because of efforts to improve care, mental health and drug abuse continue to affect many new mothers.

Some of these deaths might reflect stigmas that stop women from getting help for mental health and drug problems, the researchers suggested.

About 75% of those who died had visited an emergency department at least once after giving birth, so the ER might be a place where these problems can be identified and treatment begun, the study authors said.

The majority of these deaths happened in the second half of the year after birth, which indicates that women should stay connected with addiction and suicide prevention programs, Margerison said in a university news release.

"These deaths are likely just the tip of the iceberg in terms of substance use and mental distress," she said. "We need to take the next steps to understand how to help women who experience these problems during and after pregnancy."

The report was published online June 4 in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

More information

To learn more about postpartum depression, visit the U.S. National Institute of Mental Health.