611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
AHA News: What Heart Patients Should Know About CoronavirusHealthy Heart in Your 20s, Healthier Brain Decades LaterScientists Spot Early Markers of Coronavirus in Lungs of PatientsJapan Closes Schools to Help Stem Coronavirus SpreadHow to Prepare, Protect Yourself From CoronavirusMore Than 4 in 10 Americans Are Now Obese: CDCTrump Taps Pence to Head Coronavirus Response, As 1st U.S. Case of 'Unknown Origin' SpottedDrug Offers Hope Against Tough-to-Treat Chronic CoughWeight Gain Is No Friend to Aging LungsSugary Sodas Wreak Havoc With Cholesterol Levels, Harming the HeartMore Countries Report Coronavirus Cases, as Outbreak in U.S. Looks CertainU.S. Veterans With Blocked Leg Arteries Seeing Better ResultsBad Sleep, Bad Diet = Bad Heart?Could Heartburn Meds Spur Growth of Drug-Resistant Germs in Your Gut?How Coronavirus Raced Through Quarantined Cruise ShipCoronavirus Outbreak in America Is Coming: CDCGlobal Coronavirus Outbreaks Raise Fears of PandemicGlobal Coronavirus Outbreaks Worry Experts, as U.S. Cases Reach 34Sticking With Meds Lowers Lupus Patients' Diabetes RiskU.S. Coronavirus Cases Reach 34: CDCAHA News: Research Opens New Avenues to Reduce Foot, Toe AmputationsYour Best Bet Against Heart Attack, Stroke? Lower Blood PressureLung Diseases on the Rise WorldwideNew China Coronavirus Cases Decline, 2 Passengers From Affected Cruise Ship DieAHA News: What Women Need to Know About Breast Cancer and Heart DiseaseU.S. Scientists Take Key Step Towards Towards Coronavirus VaccineQuarantine Ends on Cruise Ship in Japan as Coronavirus Cases Near 75,000AHA News: Race and Gender May Tip the Scales on Traditional Stroke Risk FactorsMeasles Complications Can Affect Every Organ: StudyBabies' Exposure to Household Cleaning Products Tied to Later Asthma RiskCoronavirus: Are U.S. Hospitals Prepared?14 Americans From Cruise Ship Hit By Coronavirus Test Positive for InfectionHot Chocolate Could Help Ease Painful Clogged Leg VesselsAntiviral Drug, Plasma Transfusions Show Promise in Treating CoronavirusHow to Dispel Your Child's Fears About the New CoronavirusCholesterol Drugs Might Help Curb 'High-Risk' Prostate CancersCoronavirus Spreads Most Easily When Patients Are Sickest: CDCWill Brushing and Flossing Protect You Against Stroke?Young Black Adults More Prone to Stroke, but Don't Know ItAHA News: Stroke Rates Down for Mexican Americans, Up for White AdultsCoronavirus Cases, Deaths Rise Sharply, While 2 New Cases Reported in U.S.Scientists Spot Antibody That Might Help Diagnose, Treat Autoimmune DisordersCoronavirus in America: Keep Your Panic in CheckCoronavirus Spread Slows, But Death Toll Jumps to 1,113Growing Up in U.S. 'Stroke Belt' Bad for the Brain Later in LifeShingles Vaccine Bonus: Reduced Risk of Stroke?Air Pollution Made in One State Can Cause Deaths in OthersWere You Born in an H1N1 Flu Year or an H3N2? It MattersStricter Clean Air Laws Could Save Thousands of Lives a Year: StudyCoronavirus Fears Have U.S. Pharmacies Running Out of Face Masks
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Lyme Disease Now a Threat in City Parks

HealthDay News
by By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: May 15th 2019

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, May 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As deer populations have exploded across America, moving from forests to suburbs to urban parks, they have brought the threat of Lyme disease to millions of city dwellers, a new study finds.

In fact, the deer tick that spreads Lyme disease is as prevalent in many New York City parks as it is in areas known to be endemic for the bacterial disease, such as Connecticut and other states in the Northeast.

"Where deer are able to survive and thrive, we expect to see ticks -- and we did," said lead researcher Meredith VanAcker. She is a graduate student in the department of ecology, evolution and environmental biology at Columbia University in New York City.

"What was surprising was that although tick populations in these parks increased in the recent past, we see the same level of infection in these urban tick populations as we do in endemic areas," she said.

That means people have the same risk of getting Lyme disease in some city parks as they do in suburban and rural landscapes, VanAcker said.

Lyme disease is caused by bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi, and is transmitted by the bite of the tiny black-legged tick -- also known as the deer tick. These ticks are about the size of a poppyseed.

Deer don't infect ticks with the bacteria that causes Lyme. Rather, birds and small mammals are the culprit, VanAcker explained. The deer simply provide the tick with a home to breed and grow.

Symptoms of Lyme disease include fever, headache, fatigue and a bullseye skin rash. If not treated, the infection can spread to joints, the heart and nervous system, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Human risk for getting Lyme disease depends on the abundance of deer ticks, as well as deer and mice, which are part of the ticks' life cycle.

For the study, VanAcker and her colleagues sampled ticks in 24 parks in the five boroughs of New York City.

The researchers found deer ticks that carried the Lyme bacteria in parks that were accessible to deer, particularly those in the Bronx and Staten Island.

No deer ticks were found in Manhattan's Central Park, which is cut off from deer, VanAcker noted.

Infected ticks were mostly found in forested parks with vegetation around the edges and connected to each other.

By extrapolating their data, the investigators found that the deer tick population in these parks is as dense as it is in areas where Lyme disease is common.

VanAcker suspects that other diseases carried by the deer tick are also present in parks populated by deer. Her next study will try to find out what other tick-borne diseases lurk in city parks.

Dr. Marc Siegel, a professor of medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, said, "There's a lot more Lyme disease coming from non-rural areas, especially Staten Island."

Siegel noted that the Lyme rash only occurs in 60% of patients. He looks for symptoms such as fatigue and muscle aches.

"If I have a patient with fatigue and muscle aches who has trouble concentrating, and I do a Lyme test which is not conclusive, I consider treating them," he said.

Treatment is a round of antibiotics to knock the disease out.

"I tend to overtreat Lyme," Siegel said. "If I think it's Lyme, I give you four weeks of antibiotics. Treatment is usually 10 days to two weeks. I like four weeks because Lyme can recur," he said.

The best way to not get Lyme disease is to take precautions. These include wearing long pants tucked into your socks and using an insect repellent containing DEET and staying on trails, according to Lorraine Johnson, the CEO of LymeDisease.org.

Also, you should check yourself for ticks when you get home. "The best way to do that is to take a shower and feel your skin, because these ticks are really small," Johnson said.

The report was published in the June issue of the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases.

More information

Visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for more on Lyme disease.