611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Health Tip: Recognizing Heat ExhaustionInsect Stings Are Just a Buzzkill for Most FolksDisinfectants Can't Stop This Dangerous Hospital GermHealth Tip: Working in Extreme HeatHealth Tip: Diarrhea in KidsHow to Protect Your DNA for Big Health BenefitsNewer Lung Cancer Screening Saves More LivesHigh Blood Pressure, 'Bad' Cholesterol Risky for Young, TooSummer Can Be Hard on Your HearingMany Pneumonia Patients Get Too Many AntibioticsAdopt a Diet That's Good for Your GutAHA News: 5 Threats to Heart Health You May Not Be Aware OfTongue, Lip Snip Surgeries May Be Overused in U.S. NewbornsHealth Tip: Foods With LactoseHealth Tip: Living With Celiac DiseaseMore Evidence Fried Food Ups Heart Disease, Stroke RiskBrain Injury Often a Devastating Side Effect of Domestic ViolenceNew Migraine Drug Might Help When Other Meds Don'tXpovio With Dexamethasone Approved for Refractory Multiple MyelomaPoor Social Life Could Spell Trouble for Older Women's BonesIs Your Mattress Releasing Toxins While You Sleep?Zika's Damage Continues in Children Infected Before BirthCDC Warns of Start to 'Season' for Mysterious Paralyzing Illness in KidsShould You Try Allergen Immunotherapy?Dangerous UTIs Can Follow Hospital Patients HomeMore Evidence Supplements Won't Help the Heart'Semi-Slug' Is Spreading a Lethal Parasite in HawaiiAHA News: 'Surprising' Lack of Progress on Heart Disease in Younger AdultsSmall Vessel Disease Leaves Patients Vulnerable to Leg AmputationHealth Tip: Eating Out If You Have a Food AllergyHow to Create a Diet That Lowers Your CholesterolHow Protect Against Short- and Long-Term Sun DamageSurgeons Give 13 Paralyzed Adults Hand, Arm MovementIt's Mosquito Season: Here's How to Protect YourselfConcussion Recovery Isn't the Same for Every Football PlayerOften Feel Bloated? One Ingredient May Be to BlameFor Many, Pot Is Now an Alternative to Opioids or Sleep MedsSurgery Helps Babies Missing a Heart Chamber Survive, But Problems LingerAnti-Vaccine Movement a 'Man-Made' Health Crisis, Scientists WarnCan Stem Cells Be the Cure for Baldness?Cancer Risk Rises After Iodine Rx for Overactive Thyroid: StudyGut Bacteria Supplements Might Boost Obese People's HealthEye Injuries From Fireworks in U.S. Have Nearly DoubledHealth Tip: Swallowing ProblemsMedtronic Recalls Some Insulin Pumps as FDA Warns They Could Be HackedAir Pollution Bad News for Your Blood PressureFDA Approves First Drug for Sinusitis With Nasal PolypsInfections, Especially UTIs, May Be Triggers for StrokesCould Heavier Folks Be at Lower Risk for ALS?A New Way to Spot Consciousness Earlier in Comatose Patients?
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Does Removing Your Appendix Put You at Risk for Parkinson's?

HealthDay News
by By Alan Mozes
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: May 9th 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, May 9, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- It's a connection few have probably considered, but new research suggests that having your appendix removed may up your risk for Parkinson's disease down the road.

The finding follows an analysis that examined health records for roughly 62 million patients. Of these, about 488,000 had an appendectomy. Among those who had the surgery, just under 1% developed the progressive nervous system disorder later.

In comparison, less than .3% of the patients who did not have an appendectomy faced the same fate.

That means that while the overall risk remained low, there was a tripling of risk among those had had their appendix removed.

With this latest study, "We found that there is an increase in prevalence of Parkinson's disease in patients with appendectomies, suggesting a correlation between them," said study author Dr. Mohammed Sheriff. He is an internal medicine physician with Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center.

But does that mean patients should avoid having their appendix removed?

Sheriff said no, given that the findings neither prove that one causes the other, nor clarify the exact nature of the link.

"At this point, it is unclear if it is the process in appendicitis itself versus the appendectomy that increases the risk of Parkinson's disease," he said. "Therefore, changes to practice should not be made. Of course, currently the predominant course of treatment for appendicitis is surgical, and it should continue to be so until further work is done."

Parkinson's affects movement, with symptoms starting gradually and progressing over time. Tremors are common, and walking and speech can be affected. There is no known cure.

Prior research has also pointed to an appendix-Parkinson's link, albeit in the opposite direction. In a study published in October, U.S. researchers looking at data on over 1.6 million Swedes found that appendectomy lowered Parkinson's risk by roughly 20 percent.

Sherriff's team acknowledges that prior research on the subject has come to "inconsistent" results. So, they conducted the current analysis by reviewing data collected by an Ohio-based electronic health records company that tracked the information of patients who had received care provided by 26 different health care systems.

The latest analysis did not track exactly how much time had elapsed between undergoing an appendectomy and the onset of Parkinson's among those who developed the disease.

But investigators did note that the increased risk they saw appeared to affect both genders, as well as all ages and races.

Still, Sherriff cautioned that despite evidence of some sort of connection between appendix removal and Parkinson's risk, "there is further work needed to be done to determine the mechanism."

That thought was seconded by Kuldip Dave, director of research programs with the Michael J. Fox Foundation in New York City.

"There's a growing body of evidence demonstrating a connection between the gut and Parkinson's," Dave acknowledged. For example, he noted that prior research has identified a pathway between the gut and brain that runs through the vagus nerve and the circulatory system.

What's more, "researchers have found alpha-synuclein, the primary Parkinson's protein, in the gastrointestinal tract," Dave said. "So, it's no surprise that the appendix and Parkinson's have been linked."

But he stressed that while ongoing research has directed increasing focus to a possible gut-brain connection, "there is nothing currently that definitively tells us that removing your appendix will increase your risk of getting Parkinson's," Dave said.

"This study proves an association between the two," he said, "but more research is needed to understand the exact connection between the gut and Parkinson's."

The findings are to be presented May 20 at the Digestive Disease Week meeting, in San Diego. Such research is considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

The Michael J. Fox Foundation offers more about Parkinson's disease.