611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Smoking
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Fewer Americans Than Ever Smoke, but Vaping Poses a Growing Threat: CDCVaping-Linked Lung Illnesses Top 2,100, CDC SaysThink Vaping Is Heathier for Your Heart Than Smoking? Think AgainTrump Administration Wants to Raise Age to Buy E-Cigs to 21Vitamin E Acetate Is Leading Suspect in Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses: CDCVaping-Linked Lung Illnesses Top 2,000, CDC SaysJuul Stops Sales of Mint-Flavored E-Cigarettes1 in 4 High School Kids Vape, Mint Flavor PreferredStill Way Too Much Smoking in Movies Aimed at KidsClose to 1,900 Cases of Vaping-Linked Lung Illness, CDC SaysHealth Tip: Signs of Nicotine WithdrawalIt May Be Even Tougher for Women to Quit Smoking Than MenFlavored E-Cigarettes Get Teens Hooked on Vaping, Study FindsCases of Vaping-Linked Lung Illness Now Top 1,600Nasal Swab Could Help Gauge Smokers' Odds for Lung CancerFlavors Draw Young People to Lifetime Habit of Vaping, Study ShowsSecondhand Smoke May Harm Kids' EyesJuul Halts Sale of Fruit, Dessert Flavors of E-CigarettesLight Smoking Causes More Lung Damage Than Once Suspected: StudyClose to 1,300 Cases of Vaping-Linked Illness Now IdentifiedMouse Study Suggests Vaping Might Raise Cancer RiskCases of Serious Vaping-Linked Lung Injury Now Top 1,000Teen Use of Flavored E-Cigarettes Keeps Rising'Toxic Fumes' May Be Driving Vaping-Linked Lung IllnessesPoll Finds Many Young Americans Think Vaping is SafeTHC-Laced Products May Be to Blame for Majority of Vaping-Linked Illnesses: CDCMore Than 800 Cases of Vaping-Linked Illness Across 46 States, CDC SaysE-Cigarette Maker Juul Stops All Advertising, Replaces CEODoes Parents' Smoking Raise Future Heart Risks for Kids?'He May Need a Ventilator': One Teen's Fight Against Vaping-Linked Lung IllnessFlavored E-Cigarettes May Make Asthma WorseFlavored E-Cigarette Use Soars Among Young AdultsCases of Vaping-Linked Lung Illness Rise to 530 Across 38 States: CDCChemicals From Heat-Not-Burn Tobacco Devices Not Harmless: StudyScientists Find Unsafe Levels of Known Carcinogen in Menthol E-CigarettesCDC Revises Number of Vaping-Linked Lung Illnesses to 380 in 36 StatesTrump Pushing for Nationwide Ban on Flavored E-CigarettesAre Hookahs Safer Than Cigarettes? Chemical Study Says No WayWould a Health Warning on Every Cigarette Help Smokers Quit?FDA Warns Juul About Illegal Marketing Claims and Pitch to YouthVaping-Linked Lung Illnesses Double, Vitamin E Acetate Leading SuspectHealth Officials Close in on Culprit in Vaping Lung Injury CasesAs Lung Injury Cases Rise, CDC Says 'Don't Vape'Jumps in Pot Use, Depression and Drinking Threaten Gains Against SmokingLots of Teens Are Breathing in Others' Vaping FumesVaping May Trigger Lung Damage Like That Seen in EmphysemaIn-Store Marketing Helps Get Kids VapingFirst Death Tied to Lung Injury From Vaping Reported in IllinoisCases of Lung Injury Tied to Vaping Keep RisingVaping Constricts Blood Vessels, Raising Heart, Lung Concerns
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Wellness and Personal Development

E-Cigarettes Used in 5% of U.S. Homes With Kids

HealthDay News
by By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: May 6th 2019

new article illustration

MONDAY, May 6, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- As e-cigarettes gain fans, children may be losing out. New research suggests that vaping parents expose children to secondhand fumes that may be as harmful as tobacco smoke.

Nearly 5% of U.S. adults living with children use e-cigarettes, according to the study. And many of those kids have asthma.

"Although e-cigarette aerosols are commonly perceived to be harmless vapors, they contain numerous potentially harmful chemicals," said lead researcher Jenny Carwile.

Kids living with adult vapers could be exposed to volatile organic compounds, like formaldehyde; nicotine; heavy metals and ultra-fine particulates, said Carwile. She's with the division of applied health care delivery science at Maine Medical Center, in Portland.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that e-cigarettes not be used around children. It also wants to see smoke-free laws for cigarettes expanded to include electronic-cigarettes, Carwile added.

Stanton Glantz is director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California, San Francisco. "Exposure to e-cigarette vapor is a growing problem," he said.

"The more we learn, the more dangerous e-cigarettes are," Glantz added.

For the study, Carwile and colleagues used data from the U.S. Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System for 2016 through 2017.

Participants were asked how often they used e-cigarettes and other vaping products. Some were also asked about children living with them and if the children had asthma.

The researchers found that more than 4% of adults used e-cigarettes. But prevalence was higher among those who had a child in the home (nearly 5%). This could reflect the younger age of vapers, many of whom are in their reproductive years, the researchers suggested.

E-cigarette use was also greater among adults living with a child with asthma (5.6%), versus those living with a child without asthma (4.8%), Carwile's team found.

That's not good news. A study published in January in the journal Chest found that exposure to secondhand vapor was tied to a significantly increased risk of an asthma attack among teens.

In addition, the new study found that e-cigarette use varies across the United States. The heaviest use among parents is in Oklahoma (almost 8%) and the least is in Washington, D.C. (2%).

Glantz pointed out that e-cigarettes create a residue of addictive nicotine. The nicotine levels are not very different from that seen with exposure to tobacco smoke, he said.

Also of concern are flavorings, which are marketed to younger people. "Flavorings are very toxic to lungs," he explained.

As e-cigarette use continues to expand, so too will exposure to secondhand vapor. It's still early in the e-cigarette epidemic, so you can expect the problem to worsen, he noted.

It's the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's job to crack down on e-cigarettes, but so far, the agency has only talked about it, Glantz said. He added that he worries that the agency's reluctance to take action is interpreted as saying vaping is safe.

The FDA's position -- or lack of one -- is "great for the e-cigarette companies, but I think it's bad for public health," he said. "And it's leading to increased secondhand exposure."

The report was published online May 6 in JAMA Pediatrics.

More information

For more on vaping, visit the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.