611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Health Tip: Recognizing Heat ExhaustionInsect Stings Are Just a Buzzkill for Most FolksDisinfectants Can't Stop This Dangerous Hospital GermHealth Tip: Working in Extreme HeatHealth Tip: Diarrhea in KidsHow to Protect Your DNA for Big Health BenefitsNewer Lung Cancer Screening Saves More LivesHigh Blood Pressure, 'Bad' Cholesterol Risky for Young, TooSummer Can Be Hard on Your HearingMany Pneumonia Patients Get Too Many AntibioticsAdopt a Diet That's Good for Your GutAHA News: 5 Threats to Heart Health You May Not Be Aware OfTongue, Lip Snip Surgeries May Be Overused in U.S. NewbornsHealth Tip: Foods With LactoseHealth Tip: Living With Celiac DiseaseMore Evidence Fried Food Ups Heart Disease, Stroke RiskBrain Injury Often a Devastating Side Effect of Domestic ViolenceNew Migraine Drug Might Help When Other Meds Don'tXpovio With Dexamethasone Approved for Refractory Multiple MyelomaPoor Social Life Could Spell Trouble for Older Women's BonesIs Your Mattress Releasing Toxins While You Sleep?Zika's Damage Continues in Children Infected Before BirthCDC Warns of Start to 'Season' for Mysterious Paralyzing Illness in KidsShould You Try Allergen Immunotherapy?Dangerous UTIs Can Follow Hospital Patients HomeMore Evidence Supplements Won't Help the Heart'Semi-Slug' Is Spreading a Lethal Parasite in HawaiiAHA News: 'Surprising' Lack of Progress on Heart Disease in Younger AdultsSmall Vessel Disease Leaves Patients Vulnerable to Leg AmputationHealth Tip: Eating Out If You Have a Food AllergyHow to Create a Diet That Lowers Your CholesterolHow Protect Against Short- and Long-Term Sun DamageSurgeons Give 13 Paralyzed Adults Hand, Arm MovementIt's Mosquito Season: Here's How to Protect YourselfConcussion Recovery Isn't the Same for Every Football PlayerOften Feel Bloated? One Ingredient May Be to BlameFor Many, Pot Is Now an Alternative to Opioids or Sleep MedsSurgery Helps Babies Missing a Heart Chamber Survive, But Problems LingerAnti-Vaccine Movement a 'Man-Made' Health Crisis, Scientists WarnCan Stem Cells Be the Cure for Baldness?Cancer Risk Rises After Iodine Rx for Overactive Thyroid: StudyGut Bacteria Supplements Might Boost Obese People's HealthEye Injuries From Fireworks in U.S. Have Nearly DoubledHealth Tip: Swallowing ProblemsMedtronic Recalls Some Insulin Pumps as FDA Warns They Could Be HackedAir Pollution Bad News for Your Blood PressureFDA Approves First Drug for Sinusitis With Nasal PolypsInfections, Especially UTIs, May Be Triggers for StrokesCould Heavier Folks Be at Lower Risk for ALS?A New Way to Spot Consciousness Earlier in Comatose Patients?
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

'Ringing in the Ears' May Drive Some to the Brink of Suicide

HealthDay News
by By Steven ReinbergHealthDay Reporter
Updated: May 2nd 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, May 2, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Imagine a ringing in your ears so intense and unrelenting that you become desperate enough to try to kill yourself.

That is a reality for some -- women in particular -- who suffer from severe tinnitus, new research shows.

The survey of 72,000 Swedish adults found that 9% of women who suffered from severe tinnitus had attempted suicide, as had 5.5% of men.

After analyzing the data, European researchers found that the association between ringing ears and risk for attempted suicide was only significant for women.

"It is important to say that an increased risk of suicide attempts does not mean an increased risk in suicide events," said lead researcher Christopher Cederroth, from the laboratory of experimental audiology at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. Also, only an association and not a cause-and-effect link was observed.

Cederroth added that he isn't aware of any completed suicides related to tinnitus.

"Our results reflect more the sex-specific psychological impact of tinnitus rather than a risk of committing suicide," he said.

On the plus side, Cederroth said that the risk for suicide isn't significant for people who have had their tinnitus treated.

"Medical attention by a specialist may help decrease tinnitus-related distress," he said. "Even though there are currently no treatments to get rid of tinnitus, seeing a specialist may help decrease the distress and diminish the risk of suicide attempts."

Dr. Darius Kohan, director of otology/neurotology at Lenox Hill Hospital and the Manhattan Eye Ear and Throat Hospital in New York City, reviewed the study. He said that although the cause of most tinnitus isn't known, ways to help people cope with the condition are available.

"Tinnitus can be very severe and debilitating," Kohan said, noting that it's a very common condition, affecting about 20% of the population. He isn't sure why the association between tinnitus and suicide risk appears more serious in women than men. Perhaps it's just the way the study was done, he said.

"It's old age and degeneration of the blood supply to the inner ear, plus hearing loss as the nerve cells die off," said Kohan. In addition, stress, caffeine and aspirin can cause tinnitus, he said.

Treatment usually involves helping people cope with the condition, Kohan said. Treatments can include cutting out caffeine and aspirin and also taking supplements such as ginkgo biloba or B vitamins.

In addition, patients can use various devices to provide a background sound to mask the ringing in their ears. These can include white noise generators, an air conditioner, or even the TV, Kohan said. This can be especially effective at night when tinnitus can be at its worst.

Other treatments that may work are acupuncture and cognitive behavioral therapy, Kohan said. Patients can be taught to ignore the sound. Some patients may also need antidepressants or anti-anxiety medications, he added.

Richard Tyler, an audiologist and professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Iowa, said that most insurance doesn't cover treatment for tinnitus.

"It certainly is true that many tinnitus sufferers have severe problems with thoughts and emotions, hearing, sleep and concentration," Tyler said. "Unfortunately, there is no reimbursement to the hearing health care field for counseling and sound therapy. This is a major obstacle."

The report was published online May 2 in the journal JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

More information

Harvard Medical School offers more details about tinnitus.