611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Vaping Constricts Blood Vessels, Raising Heart, Lung ConcernsWhen Does Heart Health Return to Normal After Quitting Smoking?New Antibiotic Approved for Community-Acquired Bacterial PneumoniaImplant Approved to Improve Symptoms in Advanced Heart Failure'No Quick Fix' for A-Fib, But Cardiologist Says You Can Help Prevent ItAHA News: Why Do Women Get Statins Less Frequently Than Men?'Dr. Google' Helps Some Patients Diagnose a Rare DiseaseHealth Tip: Recognizing a Staph InfectionIs Dairy Fat Different?CDC Recommends Catch-Up HPV Vaccination for Young AdultsHow to Relieve Dry, Irritated EyesPretomanid Approved for Treatment of Drug-Resistant TBAHA News: Tiring Easily May Warn of Future Heart TroubleAmerica's Obesity Epidemic May Mean Some Cancers Are Striking SoonerHeavy Smog as Bad as Pack-a-Day Smoking for LungsConcussed NFL Players Sidelined for Much Longer NowadaysHormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Might Harm the Heart: StudyObesity and 'Spare Tire' Raise Hispanics' Odds for Early DeathAHA News: Protein Made During Long Workouts May Warn of Heart ProblemsHow to Help Your Heart Weather Extreme HeatHealth Threats Don't End for Some Sepsis SurvivorsHeat Waves Brought by Climate Change Could Prove Deadly for Kidney PatientsHealth Tip: Avoiding AnemiaAre You Still Putting Off Colon Cancer Screening?Tips for Preventing DiverticulitisFDA Reports More Seizures Among VapersKids Getting Too Many Opioids After TonsillectomyCan Major Surgeries Cause a Long-Term 'Brain Drain'?How Much Coffee Is Too Much for Migraine Sufferers?Steady Stream of Lesser Head Hits in Football Can Still Damage BrainDon't Sweat It: Hyperhydrosis Can Be TreatedFast-Food Joints on Your Way to Work? Your Waistline May WidenAdults Need Vaccines, TooHealth Tip: Managing Arthritis of the Hands'Selfies' Might Someday Track Your Blood PressureIn Heat Waves, Fans May Do More Harm Than GoodSmoking Creates Long-Lasting Risk for Clogged Leg ArteriesFootball Head Trauma Linked Again to Long-Term Brain DamageDrug Approved to Treat Tenosynovial Giant Cell TumorRugby-Style Tackling Might Make Football SaferFor Kids With Asthma, Allergies, New School Year Can Bring Flare-UpsFrailty Not a Normal Part of AgingAHA News: Hurricane Checklist: Batteries, Bottled Water – And A Plan for Heart CareDangerous Sesame Allergy Affects Many AmericansScorching Pavement Sends Some to the ER With BurnsHealth Tip: Living With Hypoglycemia3-D Printers Might Someday Make Replacement HeartsCDC Renews Pledge to Fight Ebola Outbreak in AfricaAnemia Linked to Higher Odds for Dementia in SeniorsDrug Duo May Be an Advance Against a Common Leukemia
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Half of Older Dialysis Patients Die Within a Year, Study Finds

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Apr 25th 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, April 25, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The death rate for older Americans receiving dialysis for kidney failure may be nearly twice as high as widely thought, according to a new report.

For the study, researchers looked at 391 Medicare patients, aged 65 and older, who started dialysis, in which a machine is used to remove toxins from the blood.

Nearly 23% of the patients died within a month of starting dialysis; nearly 45% died within six months; and nearly 55% died within a year, the investigators found.

The highest death rates were among patients older than 85; those who had four or more major health problems in addition to kidney failure; those who started dialysis in the hospital instead of on an outpatient basis; and those who, even before starting dialysis, required help with tasks of daily living such as eating or bathing.

The study was published April 22 in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

The death rates found in the study were nearly double those cited in federal government statistics. This suggests doctors and patients may be basing treatment decisions on overly optimistic survival estimates, the researchers said.

"Dialysis can seem like a magical cure for someone whose kidneys are failing, but our finding that half of older adults die within the first year after starting dialysis is sobering," said lead author Melissa Wachterman. She is an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, in Boston.

"When time is short, how you spend that time becomes even more important. Spending the better part of three days a week doing dialysis may not be the right choice for everyone, and people should factor this new evidence into their decisions," Wachterman said in a school news release.

In the United States, more than 120,000 people started dialysis in 2015, half of them over age 65. Dialysis keeps some people alive until they receive a kidney transplant, but most dialysis patients, particularly older ones, don't get transplants.

Dialysis is not the only option for kidney failure patients. A more conservative approach involves providing medications and other therapies to relieve the disease symptoms, without dialysis, Wachterman said.

Patients generally don't live as long with this approach, but it spares them the burden and potential harms of dialysis, according to the researchers.

"The goal in difficult clinical situations like this is shared decision-making, where patients and clinicians can work together to make choices that best balance patients' goals and values with the objective medical evidence," Wachterman said.

She suggested that doctors may have been painting "an overly rosy picture" about the prospects for some patients considering dialysis.

"We hope this new evidence can help patients and families cope with what lies ahead and empower them to make informed treatment decisions that are most aligned with their goals and preferences," she said in the news release.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more on treatment for kidney failure.