611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Cancer
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
'Double-Edged Sword': Lung Cancer Radiation Rx May Raise Heart Attack RiskYour Drinking Water May Harbor Cancer-Causing Nitrate: StudyNo Needle Prick: Laser-Based Test Hunts Stray Melanoma Cells in BloodChemoimmunotherapy Regimen Approved to Treat DLBCLCancer Survivors Predicted to Top 22 Million by 2030Guard Your Skin Against the Summer Sun'Focused' Radiation Could Lighten Treatment Burden for Early Breast Cancer1 in 4 Cancer Survivors Faces 'Financial Hardship' Due to Medical CostsFew Prostate Cancer Patients Are Getting Checkups They NeedTesticular Cancer Treatment Unlikely to Trigger Birth DefectsIs MRI Screening Worth It for Breast Cancer Survivors?Obamacare May Have Helped Close 'Race Gap' in Cancer CareObamacare May Have Boosted Fight Against Ovarian CancerCould 2 Prostate Cancer Drugs Fight Disease in Earlier Stages?Newer Drug Extends Lives of Young Breast Cancer PatientsU.S. Cancer Cases, Deaths Continue to FallA New Way to Fight a Previously 'Inoperable' Pancreatic CancerCancer Patients Vaping in Growing NumbersColon Cancer Striking More Under 50, and More Often in Western StatesAlex Trebek Says His Pancreatic Cancer Is 'Near Remission'Blood Test Could Spot Multiple Cancer Types, Researchers SayFirst PI3K Inhibitor Approved for Metastatic, Advanced Breast CancerAggressive Uterine Cancer on the Rise, Especially in Blacks: StudyColon Cancer Screenings Increase When Medicaid ArrivesPoor Diet Might Raise Your Cancer Risk'Watchful Waiting' Less Likely for Black Prostate Cancer PatientsAggressive Approach to Pancreatic Cysts May Prevent Dreaded CancerColon Cancer Increasingly Striking the Young WorldwideTrans Women Have Raised Odds of Breast Cancer, But Risk Still Small: StudyIs That Prostate Cancer Worth Treating? Chromosomes May TellLooking to Whales for Insight on Human CancersIs AI a New Weapon in Breast Cancer Detection?Use of Meds for Enlarged Prostate Might Delay a Cancer DiagnosisDoes Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Raise Dementia Risk?Red Tape Means Many Cancer Patients Get Radiation Treatments LateDevice Spots Lymphedema Early in Breast Cancer Patients, to Help Stop ItGene Therapy May Help Fight Tough-to-Treat Blood CancerHealth Tip: Managing Nausea for Cancer PatientsOne High Dose of Radiation May Be Enough for Early Prostate CancerMany Cardiologists Ill-Equipped to Treat Heart Disease in Cancer SurvivorsStudy Supports Radiation for Early, Hormone-Driven Breast CancerNot All Cervical Cancer Rates Are DecliningMedical Marijuana Use Rising Among Cancer PatientsWith Weeks to Live, Many Cancer Patients Try Useless TreatmentsBalversa Approved for Advanced Bladder CancerChemo Drug Shortages Have Little Effect on Cancer Care: StudyMany Cancer Patients Take Alternative Meds But Don't Tell Their DoctorsNew 'Cancer Vaccine' Attacks Tumors From WithinAHA News: How Can Therapy for Heart Attack Patients Help Cancer Survivors?Researchers Seek Firefighters for Data on Cancer Risk
LinksBook ReviewsSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Pain Management

Balversa Approved for Advanced Bladder Cancer

HealthDay News
by -- Scott Roberts
Updated: Apr 15th 2019

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Balversa (rdafitinib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with advanced or spreading bladder cancer caused by a genetic defect called FGFR3 or FGFR2, the agency said in a news release.

"We're in an era of more personalized or precision medicine, and the ability to target cancer treatment to a patient's specific genetic mutation or biomarker is becoming the standard, with advances being made in new disease types. Today's approval represents the first personalized treatment targeting susceptible FGFR genetic alternations for patients with metastatic bladder cancer," said Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the FDA's Oncology Center of Excellence.

Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the United States, the FDA said. About 20 percent of people with the disease have an FGFR mutation.

Balversa was clinically studied in a trial involving 87 people with advanced or metastatic bladder cancer and the FGFR3 or FGFR2 genetic mutation who hadn't responded to chemotherapy, the FDA said. About one-third of those given the drug had a complete or partial response to the medication; the average response lasting about 5 1/2 months.

Common side effects of Balversa included a jump in phosphate levels, mouth sores, feeling tired, changes in kidney function, diarrhea, dry mouth and changes in liver function.

Balversa may trigger serious eye problems, including inflamed eyes, inflamed cornea and disorders of the retina, the agency warned.

Doctors and other health professionals should tell men with female partners of child-bearing potential to use contraception during treatment with Balversa and for one month after the last dose, the FDA said. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding shouldn't take Balversa because it may harm a developing fetus or newborn.

Balversa is produced by Belgium-based Janssen Pharmaceutical.

The FDA said it also approved a screening test for this type of cancer, the Therascreen FGFR RGQ RT-PCR Kit, developed by Germany-based QIAGEN Manchester Ltd.

More information

Visit the FDA to learn more.