611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Cancer
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
With Weeks to Live, Many Cancer Patients Try Useless TreatmentsBalversa Approved for Advanced Bladder CancerChemo Drug Shortages Have Little Effect on Cancer Care: StudyMany Cancer Patients Take Alternative Meds But Don't Tell Their DoctorsNew 'Cancer Vaccine' Attacks Tumors From WithinAHA News: How Can Therapy for Heart Attack Patients Help Cancer Survivors?Researchers Seek Firefighters for Data on Cancer RiskDoes Cancer Battle Bring Personal Growth? Yes and No, Survivors SayIbrance Approval Expanded to Include Men With Breast CancerBirth Control Pills May Protect Against Most Serious Ovarian Cancer: StudyTreatment Advances Making Pancreatic Cancer a Less Deadly DiseaseU.S. Leads World in Reducing Prostate Cancer CasesSurgery May Boost Outcomes in Common Form of Advanced Breast CancerPancreatic Cancer Survival Odds Linked to Weight Before Age 50Dual-Drug Therapy May Boost Odds Against a Tough Breast CancerChoose the Right Colon Cancer Screening OptionMedicaid Coverage for Lung Cancer Screening All Over the MapCould the U.S. Mail Deliver Better Colon Cancer Screening Rates?Baby Monkey May Offer Hope to Preserving Fertility of Kids With CancerDrug Combo Does Double Duty Against Common Skin Lesions, CancersTecentriq Approved for Small Cell Lung CancerHormonal Therapy for Prostate Cancer Might Raise Depression RiskGenomics Could Improve Treatment of Pancreatic CancerScientists Spot Clues to Predicting Breast Cancer's ReturnAI Takes Aim at Lung Cancer Screening'Jeopardy!' Host Alex Trebek Reveals He Has Pancreatic CancerLow-Dose Aspirin Doesn't Prolong Survival in Prostate CancerExercise Might Slow Colon Cancer's AdvanceHigh Deductibles May Threaten Breast Cancer Patients' SurvivalLifestyle Changes Can Lower Your Breast Cancer RiskCould Invasive Lung Cancer Biopsies Be Replaced by Blood Tests?Colon Cancer Usually Diagnosed Late in Under-50 AdultsHigh-Fiber Diet May Help Gut 'Microbiome' Battle MelanomaAlmost Half of Global Cases of Childhood Cancer Go UndiagnosedTesticular Cancer Treatment Doesn't Always Doom FertilitySingle Dose of Keytruda May Help Put Melanoma Into RemissionCervical 'Microbiome' Could Help Predict Cancer RiskSmokers May Fare Worse Against the Deadliest Skin CancerAHA News: Cancers of the Heart Are Rare -- and Here's WhyMost Nations May Be Rid of Cervical Cancer By 2100Experimental Drug Helps Women With Deadly Type of Breast CancerAre Primary Care Doctors Prepared to Discuss Cancer Treatment?Should You Get Tested for the 'Breast Cancer Genes'?Kidney Failure Patients Face Higher Risk of Cancer DeathDespite Gains, Black Americans Still Have Highest Cancer Death RateBreast Cancer and DDT: Timing of Exposure May MatterMore U.S. Men Holding Off on Prostate Cancer SurgeryAspirin Can Help Prevent Colon Cancer, But Many at Risk Don't Take ItOne Key Step Can Help Cancer Patients Quit SmokingFertility Treatments Don't Raise Cancer Risk for Offspring
LinksBook ReviewsSelf-Help Groups
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Pain Management

Balversa Approved for Advanced Bladder Cancer

HealthDay News
by -- Scott Roberts
Updated: Apr 15th 2019

MONDAY, April 15, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Balversa (rdafitinib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with advanced or spreading bladder cancer caused by a genetic defect called FGFR3 or FGFR2, the agency said in a news release.

"We're in an era of more personalized or precision medicine, and the ability to target cancer treatment to a patient's specific genetic mutation or biomarker is becoming the standard, with advances being made in new disease types. Today's approval represents the first personalized treatment targeting susceptible FGFR genetic alternations for patients with metastatic bladder cancer," said Dr. Richard Pazdur, director of the FDA's Oncology Center of Excellence.

Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the United States, the FDA said. About 20 percent of people with the disease have an FGFR mutation.

Balversa was clinically studied in a trial involving 87 people with advanced or metastatic bladder cancer and the FGFR3 or FGFR2 genetic mutation who hadn't responded to chemotherapy, the FDA said. About one-third of those given the drug had a complete or partial response to the medication; the average response lasting about 5 1/2 months.

Common side effects of Balversa included a jump in phosphate levels, mouth sores, feeling tired, changes in kidney function, diarrhea, dry mouth and changes in liver function.

Balversa may trigger serious eye problems, including inflamed eyes, inflamed cornea and disorders of the retina, the agency warned.

Doctors and other health professionals should tell men with female partners of child-bearing potential to use contraception during treatment with Balversa and for one month after the last dose, the FDA said. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding shouldn't take Balversa because it may harm a developing fetus or newborn.

Balversa is produced by Belgium-based Janssen Pharmaceutical.

The FDA said it also approved a screening test for this type of cancer, the Therascreen FGFR RGQ RT-PCR Kit, developed by Germany-based QIAGEN Manchester Ltd.

More information

Visit the FDA to learn more.