611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Sexuality & Sexual Problems
Resources
Basic InformationLatest NewsQuestions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Family & Relationship Issues
Homosexuality & Bisexuality
Medical Disorders

When Your Partner Has Erectile Dysfunction

HealthDay News
by By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Apr 1st 2019

new article illustration

MONDAY, April 1, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Men often have a hard time acknowledging erectile dysfunction, or ED. But it can leave their partner feeling confused or even blaming themselves for something not within their control.

First, know that while the odds of ED rise after age 50, many men experience normal physical changes that are not ED. Erections may not be as firm as they once were, and it may take more foreplay to get one. It may help to have sex in the morning, when both partners are full of energy.

True ED is not being able to get or maintain an erection, though this may not happen every time. It can be related to lifestyle habits such as smoking, heavy drinking or being overweight. Stopping harmful habits, losing weight and getting into a regular exercise program can be helpful.

In middle age, ED can often be connected to a medical condition -- such as diabetes, heart disease or Parkinson's -- and new or worsening ED may signal that the condition is getting worse. Erectile dysfunction can also be a side effect of some medications and cancer treatments.

It's also important to know that up to 25 percent men under 40 experience ED, often from a psychological issue, like performance anxiety or depression. But for some, it's an early warning sign of heart disease.

For all of these reasons, encourage your partner to see his doctor or a urologist for sexual problems. It's a difficult subject to bring up, and you may face resistance if he sees ED as a stigma. But remind him that a healthy sex life is part of a healthy relationship, and that it's often possible for a doctor to uncover the underlying cause simply by taking a thorough medical history.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more on erectile dysfunction and how it can be diagnosed and treated.