611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
'Superbugs' Hang Out on Hospital PatientsHealth Tip: Understanding the Tetanus ShotHealth Tip: Earache Home CareListeria Outbreak Linked to Deli Meats, Cheeses in 4 StatesWill You Get Fat? Genetic Test May TellFood Allergies Can Strike at Any AgeWhy a Knee Replacement Can Go BadExperimental Blood Thinner May Help Prevent Stroke, Without the Bleeding RiskBuyer Beware When Purchasing Medical Test StripsEgg Allergy? Don't Let That Stop You From Getting VaccinatedGene Therapy Might Prove a Cure for 'Bubble Boy' DiseaseTwo Lives Saved in Rare 'Paired' Liver DonationYour Life Span May Be Foretold in Your Heart BeatsHealth Tip: Stopping NosebleedsKids Can Get UTIs, TooIs a New Remedy for Body Odor on the Horizon?Why More Patients Are Surviving an AneurysmCommon Diabetes Drug May Also Shield Kidneys, HeartIsraeli Team Announces First 3D-Printed Heart Using Human Cells'Added Sugars' Label on Foods Could Save Many LivesCPAP Brings Longer Life for Obese People With Sleep Apnea: StudyYoung Athletes Need to Be Sidelined After Bout of MonoPre-Cut Melons at Kroger, Walmart, Other Stores May Carry SalmonellaCDC Says Ground Beef Is Source of E. coli Outbreak, Cases Rise to 109AHA News: Is Yoga Heart-Healthy? It's No Stretch to See Benefits, Science SuggestsFDA Orders Label Warning on Alcohol Use With 'Female Viagra'Could Treating Gut Bacteria Help Ease Autism Symptoms?Hospital Privacy Curtains Could Be Breeding Ground for GermsItchy Skin Common Alongside Kidney DiseaseMany Misdiagnosed With MSVehicle Exhaust Drives Millions of New Asthma Cases AnnuallyNFL Retirees Help Scientists Develop Early Test for Brain Condition CTEMigraine Pain Linked to Raised Suicide RiskMore Time Spent in Sports, Faster Healing From ConcussionHealth Tip: Thermometer OptionsStill No Source as E. Coli Outbreak Grows to 96 Cases Across 5 States: CDCClimate Change Could Worsen Sneezin' SeasonEvenity Approved for Osteoporotic WomenNYC Declares Public Health Emergency Over Brooklyn Measles OutbreakInsurers' Denials of Opioid Coverage Spurs CDC to Clarify GuidelinesImmune-Targeted Treatment Might Help Prevent Peanut Allergy CrisesCluster of Dangerous Antibiotic-Resistant E. Coli Infection Spotted in NYCHealth Tip: Managing Chronic MigrainesFor One Man, Too Much Vitamin D Was DisastrousCDC Investigates Mystery E. Coli Outbreak Affecting 5 StatesBlacks Live Longer, Not Necessarily Better, With ALSIs It Heartburn or Something Else?Lungs, Hearts Infected With Hepatitis C Still OK for TransplantUnhealthy Diets May Be World's Biggest KillerSevere 'Mono' Infection May Raise Risk for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

U.S. Flu Season Ebbing, but Cases Still Widespread: CDC

HealthDay News
by By Steven Reinberg
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Mar 29th 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, March 29, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Though flu season has probably peaked, beware: Influenza is still widespread in much of the United States, federal health officials said Friday.

"This week activity decreased a little bit, but flu is going to be around for a while," said Lynnette Brammer, from the domestic influenza surveillance team at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Making matters worse, the predominant strain is influenza A H3N2, the most serious type, and it's putting older Americans in the hospital, she said.

How much longer flu season will last depends on how long the H3N2 virus sticks around, and if influenza B viruses start to spread, Brammer said. Right now, B viruses are causing only a small percentage of flu cases.

Though this year's flu hasn't been as bad as last year's, it's still been a severe season, not the mild one health officials had hoped for. It will still be weeks before flu drops to levels needed for the CDC to declare the season over.

In other words, there's still time to get a flu shot if you haven't done so already, Brammer said. "There's still a benefit from getting vaccinated."

That's especially important if you're in a high-risk group, such as the elderly, she said. Seniors are particularly susceptible to H3N2 and its complications, including pneumonia.

The CDC recommends that everyone 6 months of age and older get vaccinated. There's still plenty of vaccine available, Brammer said.

And remember: Even if you get the shot for this flu season, you'll still need to get vaccinated in the fall, she said.

That's important because next year's vaccine is different from this year's. Both influenza A strains -- H3N2 and H1N1 -- have mutated, and the new vaccine has been tweaked to address these changes, Brammer said.

Both strains were included this year's vaccine, but the H3N2 protection has been less than hoped, according to the CDC.

An underrated benefit of the vaccine is that even if you get sick, your flu will be milder than if you haven't been vaccinated. A milder case can prevent complications like pneumonia that can be deadly, especially to the very young and very old.

While CDC doesn't track adult deaths from flu, it does keep tabs on kids. Last week, one more child died from flu, bringing the total nationwide to 77.

Flu remained widespread in 34 states and Puerto Rico, according to CDC. Fourteen states reported regional outbreaks, and the District of Columbia and two states had local flu activity.

If you do get the flu, antiviral drugs such as Tamiflu and Relenza can make your illness less severe. But if you're sick, the CDC recommends that you stay home so you don't infect others.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers more details about flu.