611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Mixing Marijuana With Opioids May Not Be Good for Mental HealthLarge Opioid Rx After Heart, Lung Surgery Often Leads to Misuse: StudyWhy Diet Sodas Aren't the Answer for Your Sugary Drink CravingsTB Cases Drop Among the Young, But Racial Disparities PersistCases of Lung Injury Tied to Vaping Keep RisingFish Oil Not a Magic Pill Against DiabetesFacing Up to a Lesser Known Form of Migraine PainDirty Air Is Deadly, Global Study ConfirmsSmoggy Air Might Contribute to Macular DegenerationMore Antibiotics, Higher Odds for Colon Cancer?The Merits of Physical TherapyVaping Constricts Blood Vessels, Raising Heart, Lung ConcernsWhen Does Heart Health Return to Normal After Quitting Smoking?New Antibiotic Approved for Community-Acquired Bacterial PneumoniaImplant Approved to Improve Symptoms in Advanced Heart Failure'No Quick Fix' for A-Fib, But Cardiologist Says You Can Help Prevent ItAHA News: Why Do Women Get Statins Less Frequently Than Men?'Dr. Google' Helps Some Patients Diagnose a Rare DiseaseHealth Tip: Recognizing a Staph InfectionIs Dairy Fat Different?CDC Recommends Catch-Up HPV Vaccination for Young AdultsHow to Relieve Dry, Irritated EyesPretomanid Approved for Treatment of Drug-Resistant TBAHA News: Tiring Easily May Warn of Future Heart TroubleAmerica's Obesity Epidemic May Mean Some Cancers Are Striking SoonerHeavy Smog as Bad as Pack-a-Day Smoking for LungsConcussed NFL Players Sidelined for Much Longer NowadaysHormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer Might Harm the Heart: StudyObesity and 'Spare Tire' Raise Hispanics' Odds for Early DeathAHA News: Protein Made During Long Workouts May Warn of Heart ProblemsHow to Help Your Heart Weather Extreme HeatHealth Threats Don't End for Some Sepsis SurvivorsHeat Waves Brought by Climate Change Could Prove Deadly for Kidney PatientsHealth Tip: Avoiding AnemiaAre You Still Putting Off Colon Cancer Screening?Tips for Preventing DiverticulitisFDA Reports More Seizures Among VapersKids Getting Too Many Opioids After TonsillectomyCan Major Surgeries Cause a Long-Term 'Brain Drain'?How Much Coffee Is Too Much for Migraine Sufferers?Steady Stream of Lesser Head Hits in Football Can Still Damage BrainDon't Sweat It: Hyperhydrosis Can Be TreatedFast-Food Joints on Your Way to Work? Your Waistline May WidenAdults Need Vaccines, TooHealth Tip: Managing Arthritis of the Hands'Selfies' Might Someday Track Your Blood PressureIn Heat Waves, Fans May Do More Harm Than GoodSmoking Creates Long-Lasting Risk for Clogged Leg ArteriesFootball Head Trauma Linked Again to Long-Term Brain DamageDrug Approved to Treat Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumor
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Skin Fungi May Be Tied to Bowel Disease

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Mar 8th 2019

new article illustration

FRIDAY, March 8, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- Crohn's disease involves inflammation of the digestive tract. But new research into its causes is focusing on fungi commonly found on the skin.

These microscopic fungi, called Malassezia restricta, are linked to dandruff. They're found in oily skin and scalp follicles, but they also end up in the gut. However, it's not known how they get there or what they do.

The fungi may worsen intestinal disorders such as Crohn's disease -- a type of inflammatory bowel disease -- in patients with a certain genetic makeup, according to the study. Crohn's symptoms can include diarrhea, stomach cramping and weight loss.

The study results were published March 5 in the journal Cell Host & Microbe.

"We were surprised to find that Malassezia restricta was more common on intestinal tissue surfaces in Crohn's disease patients than in healthy people," said study co-author David Underhill. He is chair of inflammatory bowel disease at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles.

"Further, the presence of Malassezia was linked to a common variation in a gene known to be important for immunity to fungi -- a genetic signature more common in patients with Crohn's disease than the healthy population," Underhill said in a journal news release.

Changes in intestinal fungi such as M. restricta -- and how an individual body responds to these fungi -- may help worsen symptoms in some patients with Crohn's disease, said study co-author Jose Limon, a Cedars-Sinai research team member.

The researchers initially found that in mice, the presence of M. restricta worsened colitis, a type of intestinal inflammatory disease.

Further investigation showed that levels of M. restricta were elevated in Crohn's patients who had a genetic variation known as the IBD CARD9 risk allele. This boosts the ability of immune cells to pump out inflammatory signaling molecules in response to M. restricta.

"The data so far do not suggest that the presence of Malassezia in the gut is an inherently bad thing. We found it in some healthy people, and in mice it does not seem to cause disease in the gut by itself," Underhill said. "However, if there is some intestinal inflammation, Malassezia seems to make it worse."

The next step in this research includes determining whether eliminating M. restricta from the intestine in this group of Crohn's patients eases their symptoms.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has more on Crohn's disease.