611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Reworked Nasal Flu Vaccine Looks Good for Kids, Pediatricians' Group SaysMore U.S. Teens, Kids Seeking Mental Health Care in ERsAHA News: Overweight Kids at Higher Risk for Blood Clots as AdultsHow to Protect Your Kids From DrowningFewer Boys Are Suffering Head Injuries, But Rate Rises for GirlsWhen Can Kids Return to Play After a Concussion?One-Third of U.S. Kids Have Back Pain, Study SaysMany Parents Think Vaping Around Kids Is FineTime Change Tougher for Kids With Mental Health IssuesLargest Study Ever Finds No Link Between Measles Vaccine, AutismSocial Media 'Influencers' Can Get Kids Eating Junk FoodCalifornia Parents Are Getting Around Vaccine Law, Fueling Measles OutbreaksAlmost Half of Global Cases of Childhood Cancer Go UndiagnosedOne Plus of Texting, Social Media: Divorce Made Easier on KidsObesity a Heartbreaker for KidsGreen Space Good for Your Child's Mental HealthTaking a Bite Out of Food Ads Targeted to KidsGet Ready for Summer Camp -- and AllergiesMom's Prenatal Fish Oil Might Help Kids' Blood Pressure LaterToxins in Home Furnishings Can Be Passed on to KidsHealth Tip: 10 Ways to Encourage Kids to Eat HealthierCodeine: An Opioid Threat to KidsKid-Friendly Food Swaps Everyone Will LoveKeep Your Kids Safe From BurnsHealth Tip: Get Your Child to School on TimeDoes Bullying Start at Home?Opioids Overprescribed for Common Children's Fracture, Study SaysHalf of U.S. Kids With a Mental Health Disorder Don't Get TreatmentHealth Tip: Talk to Your Kids Early About Alcohol UseBouncing From 'Jump Park' Trampolines Into the ERHealth Tip: Prevent the Spread of Head LiceHealth Tip: Cook With Your ChildThe Lowdown on E-Cigarette Risks for KidsAs More U.S. Homes Have Handguns, Child Deaths RiseKids Exposed to Lead at Higher Odds for Mental Health Issues LaterMany Parents Wrong About What Prevents Colds in KidsMovie Violence Doesn't Make Kids Violent, Study FindsJunk Food Ads Target Minority Kids: StudyParents Often Unaware of Kids' Suicidal ThoughtsFiber: It's Not Just for AdultsAnimal Study Suggests Ritalin Won't Harm the HeartHealth Tip: Foster Healthy Hair Habits for KidsSkeletons Mature Earlier Now, Affecting Orthopedic TreatmentsNo Link Between Mom-to-Be's Diet, Baby's Allergy RiskBe Alert for Concussions in Young AthletesHealth Tip: Risk Factors for Stroke in KidsFoods That Can Lead to Obesity in KidsOpioid Overdose Deaths Triple Among Teens, KidsWhopping Numbers on Whooping CoughIs Juice on School Menus a Problem?
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting
Child Care
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

Fiber: It's Not Just for Adults

HealthDay News
by By Len Canter
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Jan 10th 2019

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Jan. 10, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- You know how important fiber is for overall health, making meals more filling and staying "regular."

But did you know that children need their fair share of fiber, too? And for the same reasons.

How much is enough? In general, the U.S. Institute of Medicine states that monitoring fiber intake should start early in life, and by their teen years, kids need nearly as much fiber as adults.

Grams of Fiber by Age:

  • Ages 1-3: 19 g.
  • Ages 4-8: 25 g.
  • Ages 9-13: 26 g for girls, 31 g for boys.
  • Ages 14-18: 26 g for girls, 38 g for boys.

The American Academy of Pediatrics says to remember the number 5 -- make sure kids eat at least 5 servings of fruits and vegetables each day plus other good sources of fiber, like whole grains.

The nutrition facts panel on packaged foods can help you make fiber-rich choices. If a food claims to be a good source of fiber, the fiber grams will be listed under carbohydrates. "Excellent" sources have 5 or more grams of fiber per serving. "Good" sources have at least 3 grams.

While whole grains make healthier choices than refined ones, some have more fiber than others. For instance, whole-grain wheat has more than whole-grain brown rice or oats. Also, the amount of fiber in the same grain can vary by brand so always read those labels. For variety, try new grains like bulgur, buckwheat, cornmeal and wild rice.

Simple changes can add up to a big improvement.

When serving veggies and fruit, don't remove edible peels -- they contain fiber, plus there's less prepping for you. When you do cook produce, avoid overcooking, which destroys fiber. Dried fruits, pumpkin and sunflower seeds, and freshly made popcorn all make great high-fiber snacks.

Try to replace some protein and starchy veggies, like potatoes, with legumes -- beans, peas and lentils. They're high in fiber, vitamins and minerals, and deliver plant-based proteins without the saturated fat of meat.

Keep in mind that the earlier in their lives that you start kids on a fiber-rich diet, the easier it will be for them to carry this healthy habit into adulthood.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has a video with tips on getting kids to eat more fiber.