611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Heart-Healthy Living Also Wards Off Type 2 DiabetesSimple Treatments to Banish Winter BluesWant to Live Longer? Just Sit a Bit Less Each DayHappiness High in States With Lots of Parks, LibrariesLook to Your Aunts, Uncles and Parents for Clues to Your LongevityMillennials' Odds for Depression Rise With Social Media UseAHA: Could Phosphate Additives in Foods Make You Less Active?Catching Up on News About Catch-Up SleepWill Cutting Out Booze for 'Dry January' Help Your Health?Health Tip: Avoid Cellphone Use While DrivingKeep Your Skin Glowing With Good Health in 2019Ring in the New Year Resolved to Improve Your HealthLoneliness Doesn't Take a HolidayBuilding the Bonds of FriendshipHow to Handle Holiday StressorsTake Time for 'Me Time'It Really Is Better to Give Than ReceiveHere's to a Healthy Holiday SeasonPut Fire Safety at the Top of Your To-Do Holiday ListThat Gift of Exercise Might Go to WasteMove Over, Air Filter. Scientists Have a Greener IdeaThe Link Between Social Media and Depression3 in 4 Americans Struggle With LonelinessPractice Patience for a Happier, Healthier YouBeware of Stressful Events in the EveningHolidays Hike Heart Attack RiskCould You Be Short on Vitamin D?Health Tip: Improve Your Sleep HabitsToo Much Time in the Sun? Skin Patch Might TellMore Green Space May Mean a Healthier HeartWorking More, But Getting Less Done?What Couch Potatoes Don't Know Can Hurt ThemAre You Better at Remembering Faces or Names? The Surprising AnswerA Healthier Diet, a Healthier You1 in 4 U.S. Adults Sits More Than 8 Hours a DayYet Another Selfie? You Might Be a NarcissistAll That Social Media May Boost Loneliness, Not Banish ItBaby Boom or Baby Bust? What Nation-by-Nation Population Trends RevealEven a 2-Minute Walk Counts in New Physical Activity GuidelinesHealth Tip: Keep Toxins from Your HomeAHA: Poor Teeth-Brushing Habits Tied to Higher Heart RiskSleepy Drivers Involved in 100,000 Crashes a YearThink Genes Dictate Your Life Span? Think AgainA Childhood Full of Happy Memories Might Benefit Your Health TodaySunday Is 'Fall Back' Time for Your Clock -- Sleep Experts Offer TipsDecorative Contact Lenses a Danger at Halloween, Any TimeAHA: Can Daylight Saving Time Hurt the Heart? Prepare Now for SpringFacebook Posts May Hint at DepressionHere's Something to Sleep OnDrowsy Driving as Risky as Drunk Driving
LinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Smoking
Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management

3 in 4 Americans Struggle With Loneliness

HealthDay News
by By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Dec 18th 2018

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Dec. 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Folks feeling lonely as the holidays approach have a lot of company, a new study suggests.

Loneliness appears to be widespread among Americans, affecting three out of every four people, researchers have found.

Further, loneliness appears to spike at specific times during adulthood. Your late 20s, mid-50s and late 80s are times when you are most at risk of feeling lonely.

Wisdom appeared to be a strong factor in avoiding feelings of loneliness, the researchers said. People who had qualities of wisdom -- empathy, compassion, control over their emotions, self-reflection -- were much less likely to feel lonely.

The extent of loneliness detected in the study was a "surprise, because this was a normal population," said senior researcher Dr. Dilip Jeste, a professor of psychiatry and neuroscience with the University of California, San Diego. "This was not a group of people at high risk for emotional problems."

On the other hand, the peaks of loneliness discovered in the study made sense to Jeste.

"These are three periods of life that are full of stress for different reasons," Jeste said.

For this study, Jeste and his colleagues surveyed 340 average adults, aged 27 to 101, living in San Diego. Each person's loneliness was measured using several different measures, including a 20-point loneliness scale developed at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

About 76 percent of people showed serious signs of loneliness based on results from the UCLA questionnaire, with 54 percent gauged as moderately lonely and 22 percent ranked as highly lonely.

Loneliness might not mean what you think it means, however.

"There's a misperception that loneliness means social isolation," Jeste said. "Loneliness is subjective. It is what you feel. The definition of loneliness is distress because of a discrepancy between actual social relationships and desired social relationships. There's a discrepancy between what I want and what I have."

Thus, people can feel lonely even if they are married and have a network of friends, if in their hearts they feel like it's not enough, Jeste explained.

That said, highly lonely people were more likely to be single, live alone and have a personal income less than $35,000, the investigators found.

The observed peak time periods for loneliness reflected ages that can be challenging in a person's life, Jeste noted:

  • The late 20s are a time when people are making choices that will affect the rest of their lives, such as their career, their choice of life partner and where they will settle. "It really puts a lot of responsibility on you," Jeste said. "It's a really difficult period. And when you compare yourself to others, you might feel you aren't doing as well as your peers."
  • The mid-50s are when people tend to experience a mid-life crisis, as signs of aging highlight the fact that their time on Earth is limited. "You see some of your friends dying, sometimes family members," Jeste said. "You become aware of your mortality for the first time."
  • The late 80s are a time of increased helplessness. Half of people at this age have dementia, and their physical abilities are in decline. "Often you've lost your spouse, and you don't have many people left around you, either family or friends," Jeste said.

People suffering from loneliness tended to have more depression, anxiety and stress in their lives, the study authors added.

And according to Craig Sawchuk, chair of Integrated Behavioral Health at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., loneliness and its accompanying emotional turmoil can harm a person's physical health.

People who are lonely can tend to become homebodies, Sawchuk said. He was not involved with the study but was familiar with the findings.

"If we're finding loneliness increases, you might see an increase in sedentary lifestyle as well," which can lead to high blood pressure, diabetes and heart problems, Sawchuk said. "These mental effects do have a wear and tear on us physically."

Wisdom appears to serve as a buffer against loneliness, with specific components that provide important context in dealing with those feelings.

For example, Jeste suggested, people better able to control their emotions can more capably handle anxiety related to loneliness, and those who self-reflect have a greater understanding of why they feel lonely.

Spirituality and empathy help a person feel more connected with others, he added. "You know you are part of a much larger cosmos. You are never alone," Jeste said. "There is something else besides you that will always be there."

Julianne Holt-Lunstad is a professor of psychology and neuroscience with Brigham Young University in Utah. She said that while self-understanding is important, people fighting feelings of loneliness should not underestimate the importance of getting out there and interacting with others who share their values or interests.

Social connection can be thought of as a fundamental need for human beings, like food and water, Holt-Lunstad added. If so, loneliness is similar to hunger and thirst -- a motivator for people to meet that need.

"If it's the motive to seek out social connection or that recognition we are lacking that connection, it seems like that should be a part of the solution rather than just trying to suppress the symptoms," she said.

But since loneliness is subjective, the solution to overcoming those feelings will be completely personal to each individual, Holt-Lunstad noted. For example, she pointed to one study that found getting involved in social groups ranked high both as what had worked for people and what had not worked to combat loneliness.

"The solution might not be the same for everybody," Holt-Lunstad said.

The new study was published online Dec. 18 in the journal International Psychogeriatrics.

More information

The Association for Psychological Science has more about loneliness.