611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

AzCH Nurse Assist Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Health Policy & Advocacy
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Calling All Blood Donors …Even Older Drugs Are Getting Steep Price Hikes, Study FindsAs Medical Marketing Soars, Is Regulation Needed?Radiation Doses From CT Scans Vary WidelyU.S. Leads Health Care Spending Among Richer Nations, But Gets LessIs Your State a Hotspot for Obesity-Linked Cancers?Health Tip: Choose the Right DoctorFDA Warns Companies on Dangerous, Unapproved Stem Cell TreatmentsMore U.S. Kids Dying From Guns, Car AccidentsRoad Rules on Smartphone Use Are Saving Bikers' Lives, TooAHA: Should Pacemakers, Defibrillators Be Recycled -- and Reused in Others?California Farm Tied to E. coli Outbreak Expands Recall Beyond Romaine LettuceHealth Tip: Use Medical Devices SafelyCalifornia Farm Implicated in Outbreak of E. coli Tied to Romaine LettuceFentanyl Now the No. 1 Opioid OD KillerHospitalizations Rising Among the HomelessElectronic Health Records Bogging Docs DownMore Are Seeking Mental Health Care, But Not Always Those Who Need It MostMillions of Americans Still Breathing Secondhand Smoke: ReportNew Approach to Opioid Crisis: Supervised Heroin Injection Programs?Many Americans Unaware of Promise of Targeted, 'Personalized' Medicine: PollAs Gun Violence Grows, U.S. Life Expectancy DropsMost Americans Lie to Their DoctorsOpioid Crisis, Suicides Driving Decline in U.S. Life Expectancy: CDCWant to Learn CPR? Try an Automated KioskHealth Surrogates Often in Dark About Loved One's WishesRestaurant 'Health Grade' Posters Could Mean Safer DiningSmoking Bans Might Help Nonsmokers' Blood PressureWarmer Winters, More Violent Crimes?Are Food Additives Good or Bad? Consumer Views VaryDrug Studies in Children Often Go Unfinished: StudyFDA Moves to Restrict Flavored E-Cig Sales, Ban Menthol CigarettesAgeism Costs Billions in Health Care DollarsAmerica Is Worried About Antibiotic ResistanceRed Cross Issues Urgent Call for Blood Ahead of the HolidaysUnder Pressure, Juul Withdraws Most Flavored E-Cigs From MarketMany Drugstores Won't Dispense Opioid Antidote as RequiredNew Cholesterol Guidelines Focus on Personalized ApproachAHA: Defibrillators Can Help Kids Survive Cardiac Arrest, TooFDA Will Ban Many Flavored E-CigarettesU.S. Smoking Rates Hit Record LowOnly a Quarter of Opioid Painkillers Taken After Most SurgeriesHome Health-Care Tests: Proceed With CautionFDA Takes on Flatulent CowsWhy Bystanders Are Less Likely to Give CPR to WomenCellphone Radiation Tied to Upped Odds for Cancer -- in RatsHealth Tip: FDA Discusses Possible Risks of Bodybuilding ProductsU.S. Hospitals Making Headway Against InfectionsAfter Mass Shootings, Blood Donations Can Go UnusedLead in Hair Dyes Must Go: FDA
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Health Insurance
Healthcare

Warming Climate, More AC -- and More Unhealthy Smog Ahead

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Jul 3rd 2018

new article illustration

TUESDAY, July 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- As global warming heats up the planet, billions of people will need more air conditioning. And that could bring an uptick in serious health problems, a new study predicts.

The research estimates up to 1,000 more deaths annually in the eastern United States alone by 2050 -- deaths linked to rising levels of air pollution because more fossil fuels will be burned at power plants to meet the demand for air conditioning.

"Climate change is here and we're going to need to adapt," study lead author David Abel said. "But air conditioning and the way we use energy is going to provide a feedback that will exacerbate air pollution as temperatures continue to get warmer."

Abel is a graduate student in the Institute for Environmental Studies' Center for Sustainability and the Global Environment at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He and his team based their analysis on combined projections from five different models.

"What we found is that air pollution will get worse," Abel said in a university news release. "There are consequences for adapting to future climate change."

While air conditioning will save lives as heat waves increase in frequency and intensity due to climate change, there will be a trade-off in increased air pollution and resulting harm to human health, added study senior author Jonathan Patz, professor of environmental studies and population health sciences at UW-Madison.

"We're trading problems," he said in the news release.

One heart specialist believes the findings make sense.

"We know there is a direct link between air pollutants and inflammation," said Dr. Satjit Bhusri, a cardiologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

As people breathe dirty air into their lungs, "this inflammation can result in injury to the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to your heart and brain," he said.

The study suggests that "global warming and heart health have a relationship, and it is not a good one," said Bhusri, who wasn't involved in the new study.

As long as reliance on fossil fuels remains high, the scenario projected by the Wisconsin team seems inevitable, Patz said.

"Heat waves are increasing and increasing in intensity," he noted. "We will have more cooling demand requiring more electricity. But if our nation continues to rely on coal-fired power plants for some of our electricity, each time we turn on the air conditioning we'll be fouling the air, causing more sickness and even deaths."

By the middle of the century, there could be an additional 13,000 deaths a year due to higher summer levels of fine particulate matter air pollution and 3,000 deaths a year from ozone pollution in the eastern United States, the researchers concluded.

About 1,000 of those deaths each year would be due to air conditioning powered by fossil fuels.

The researchers said their findings highlight the need to make greater use of sustainable sources of energy such as wind and solar power, and for more energy-efficient air conditioning.

"The answer is clean energy," Abel said. "That is something we can control that will help both climate change and future air pollution. If we change nothing, both are going to get worse."

The study results were published July 3 in PLoS Medicine.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences has more on the health effects of air pollution.