611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Some California Mosquitoes Can Carry Zika VirusHealth Tip: Managing Rheumatoid ArthritisHealth Tip: Avoiding Lyme Disease2.5 Million U.S. High School Students Had a Concussion in Past YearMany With Severe Allergies Don't Carry an EpiPen: StudyHealth Tip: Understanding MonoParkinson's Meds Tied to Higher Rate of Gambling, Sex Addiction Than ThoughtIf Opioid Addicts Survive OD, Other Hazards Lie Ahead: StudyHealth Tip: Create a Food Allergy PlanHealth Tip: Learn Warning Signs of Heat StrokeFlorida Teen First Human Case of Another Mosquito-Borne VirusExercise May Ease Inflammation Tied to ObesityAfter Concussion, Are Legs at Risk, Too?AHA: New Insights Into Sickle Cell and Stroke RiskSevere Stress May Send Immune System Into OverdriveMarriage Is Good Medicine for the HeartObesity Plagues Rural AmericaReduce Weight, Reduce the Arthritic Knee PainHealth Tip: Travel-Related Ills May Surface After You ReturnHealth Tip: What to Do if You Scratch Your EyeDoes Salt Water Help Your Cut? And Other Health Myths of SummerObesity's a Larger Problem in Rural AmericaDiabetes Linked to Risk for Parkinson's Disease60 Sickened So Far in Salmonella-Tainted Melon OutbreakSurgical Blood Transfusions Tied to Clot RiskWhy Are Statins Underused With Black Patients?U.S. Obesity Rates Rising AgainHealth Tip: Caring for a Minor BurnCould You Have Rosacea?Kitchen Towels Laden With BacteriaWalkable Neighborhoods Might Lower Kids' Asthma RiskWind Turbines' Health Impact Still Up in the AirAllergies More Common in Kids With AutismHealth Tip: Breathe Easier in a Volcano ZoneThink Twice About Tonsil, Adenoid RemovalColonoscopies, Endoscopies Carry Greater Infection Risk Than Thought: StudyYour Tummy Rumblings Might Help Diagnose Bowel DisorderHealth Tip: Three Weight Stats That Can Predict HealthHealth Tip: What To Expect From Joint Replacement SurgeryNon-Drug Migraine Treatments Often IgnoredTips for Handling a Medical EmergencyYes, You Can Put Too Much Chlorine in a PoolA Nasty Germ That Can Lurk in Favorite FoodsFirst Artificial Iris is ApprovedNew Treatment for Ulcerative Colitis ApprovedThe ER or Urgent Care?Widely Used Antibacterial Tied to Colon Woes in MiceAnother Drug to Prevent Migraines Shows PromiseNew Treatment Approved for Rare Disease PKULittle Follow-Up for Many Concussion Patients
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

The Cold Truth About Migraine Headaches

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: May 3rd 2018

new article illustration

THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Early humans' ability to adapt to cold climates may have been helped by a genetic variant that's common in modern people who live in colder regions -- and is linked with migraine headaches, researchers say.

Within the last 50,000 years, humans left Africa and colonized cold areas in Asia, Europe, and other parts of the world. And this colonization could have triggered genetic adaptations that helped these early travelers respond to cold temperatures, explained study supervisor Aida Andres. She is a geneticist with the UCL Genetics Institute, in London, England.

The researchers focused on a gene called TRPM8, which codes for the only known receptor that enables people to detect and respond to cool and cold temperatures.

The investigation revealed that a genetic variant that's "upstream" from TRPM8, and may regulate it, became increasingly common in humans living in colder climates over the last 25,000 years.

For example, only 5 percent of people with Nigerian ancestry have the variant, compared to 88 percent of people with Finnish ancestry, the researchers explained.

The higher the latitude and the colder the climate, the greater the percentage of people who have the variant, according to the study published online May 3 in the journal PLoS Genetics.

Previous research found a strong association between this variant and migraine headaches. The highest rate of migraines is among people of European descent, who also have the highest rate of the cold-adaptive genetic variant, the study authors said.

Andres and her colleagues suggested that early humans' ability to adapt to cold temperatures may have contributed, to some degree, to the differences in the prevalence of migraine headaches that exist among various human populations today.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on migraines.