611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
E-Cigarettes Slowed Wound Healing in Animal Study3-Drug Therapy Might Be Cystic Fibrosis 'Breakthrough'Pounds Regained After Weight-Loss Op Can Tell Your Doc a LotCDC Warns of Polio-Like Virus Striking More U.S. KidsNew Nerve Stimulation Technique Might Relieve Back PainGluten-Free Craze a 'Double-Edged Sword' for Celiac PatientsHealth Tip: Know the Risks of Chicken PoxKids' Concussion Symptoms May Persist for a YearNew DNA-Based Test Approved to Help Verify Blood CompatibilityAHA: A Child's Eyes May Be a Window Into Later Heart Disease RiskGenes, Not Diet, May Be Key to Gout Flare-UpsDiabetes Drug Might Help Shield the Heart From Smog's Ill EffectsHealth Tip: Understanding MigrainesHospital Privacy Curtains May Be Home to Dangerous GermsWeight-Loss Surgery May Raise Gallstone Risk: StudyStudy Sees No Link Between Gout Drug, Kidney DiseaseHealth Tip: Prevent Mold Growth at HomeOne-Third of 'Gluten-Free' Restaurant Foods in U.S. Are Not: StudyHalf of Antibiotics Given Without Infection DiagnosisMediterranean Diet May Help Preserve Your Vision: StudyAHA: Researchers Suggest New Way to Possibly Eliminate Clogged ArteriesCan a 'Noah's Ark' of Microbes Save the World's Health?Brain Scans Suggest Pain of Fibromyalgia Isn't ImaginaryHealth Tip: Treat Your Child's AllergiesAHA: Doctors Could Do More to Help Smokers With Poor CirculationAcne's Stigma Can Take a Big Mental TollDoes Less-Invasive Surgery Make Sense for You?Type 2 Diabetes Tied to Raised Risk of Tumors, Cancer Deaths'Southern' Diet Blamed for Black Americans' Health WoesOne Football Rule Change Might Lower Concussion RiskDeep Space Travel May Damage GI Tract, Animal Study ShowsNew Drug Approved for Antibiotic-Resistant Lung DiseaseDrinking Enough Water Could Be Key to Avoiding UTIsThree New Genes Linked to Chronic Back Pain'Yo-Yo' Cardio Readings May Signal Heart RisksHealth Tip: Understanding Hip Replacement SurgeryCommon Heartburn Drugs Linked to Broken Hips in Dialysis PatientsWith 80,000 Flu Deaths Last Season, Experts Urge VaccinationHealth Tip: Manage Symptoms of AnemiaHealth Tip: Considering LASIK Surgery?Don't Turn a Blind Eye to Vision ProblemsExperimental Vaccine Shows Promise in Preventing TBAntibiotics May Cure Appendicitis -- No Operation NeededGun Victims More Likely to Die Than Other Trauma PatientsSpinal Implant Could Be Breakthrough for Paralyzed PatientsHealth Tip: Maintain Healthy Cholesterol5 Tips to Manage Your Child's AsthmaNew Compounds Might Help Stop Spread of MalariaAHA: Stiffening of Blood Vessels May Point to Dementia RiskContact Lenses May Harbor Serious, Blinding Infection
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

More Than 40% of Americans Breathe Dirty Air: Report

HealthDay News
by By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Apr 18th 2018

new article illustration

WEDNESDAY, April 18, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- More than two of every five Americans reside in counties with unhealthy levels of smog and air pollution, thanks largely to the effect of global warming, health researchers report.

Ozone levels spiked in the United States in 2016, which was the nation's second-hottest year on record, according to the American Lung Association's annual State of the Air report, released Wednesday.

"As heat increases, ozone forms more rapidly, so we had more cities with more ozone days," said report author Janice Nolen, assistant vice president of national policy for the lung association. "We saw a lot of evidence in 2016 of the impact that climate change and global warming is going to have on us."

Of the 25 cities with the highest ozone levels, 16 experienced an increase in high-ozone days in 2016, the report found. Many were in smog-plagued California.

However, the report also said that levels of "dirty" air pollution are decreasing in the United States, as tailpipes and smokestacks produce cleaner exhaust.

Twenty of the 25 most polluted cities experienced fewer days in 2016 when particle pollution levels spiked, the report found.

These results hint at the potentially pernicious effects of efforts by the Trump administration to undermine the Clean Air Act, Nolen said.

"Air quality would get worse in many places" if the landmark law is weakened, Nolen said. "There are a lot of subtle places where the [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency] could weaken and roll back the progress we have made, and we are very concerned about that."

The report evaluated the two types of air pollution that dominate in the United States.

Ozone, or "smog," is a gas molecule that develops when nitrogen oxides or volatile organic compounds react with heat and sunlight.

"When there's a lot of pollution and it's really hot, the heat cooks the pollution so it magnifies the ozone in the atmosphere," explained Dr. Christy Sadreameli, an assistant professor of pediatric pulmonology with Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

Particle pollution is a mix of tiny solid and liquid particles contained in dirty exhaust from vehicles and industry. These airborne particles hamper breathing and can increase a person's risk of lung cancer, the report said.

The cities with the highest levels of ozone year-round are all in California: Los Angeles-Long Beach; Bakersfield, Visalia-Porterville-Hanford; Fresno-Madera; Sacramento-Roseville; San Diego-Carlsbad, and Modesto-Merced, according to the report.

"California has particularly struggled because of the topography -- the bowl in the middle and the mountains there on the right-hand side of the state," Nolen said. "Pollution that might normally blow into another state gets trapped in California."

Same goes for particle pollution, mostly -- Visalia-Porterville-Hanford; Bakersfield; Los Angeles-Long Beach; Fresno-Madera, and Modesto-Merced are all California cities that top the list.

But the top city for year-round particle pollution might raise some eyebrows. It's Fairbanks, Alaska, where improved air quality monitoring revealed dangerous levels of pollution.

"Fairbanks uses wood-burning stoves and wood-burning heat sources to keep themselves warm," filling the air with particulate matter from wood smoke, Nolen said.

The U.S. cities with the cleanest air include Bellingham, Wash.; Burlington-South Burlington, Vt.; Casper, Wyo.; Honolulu; Palm Bay-Melbourne-Titusville, Fla., and Wilmington, N.C.

The American Lung Association report also noted a number of Trump-led efforts that the association said could lead to worse air quality, including:

  • Legislation to weaken the Clean Air Act,
  • Repealing plans to reduce carbon pollution from power plants,
  • Removing limits on emissions from oil and gas operations,
  • Opening the door for dirtier emissions from trucks and cars.

"We need to keep the Clean Air Act strong, and attempts to weaken it are definitely going to cause health effects," Sadreameli said. "Peeling back regulations that will increase pollution is very scary to us."

More information

Visit the National Resources Defense Council for more on air pollution.