611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
Resources
Basic Information
Introduction to Trauma and Stressor-Related DisordersSigns and Symptoms of Trauma and Stressor-Related DisordersDiagnostic Descriptions of Trauma and Stressor-Related DisordersWhat Causes the Symptoms of Trauma-Related Disorders? Treatment of Trauma, PTSD, Abuse and Other Stressor-Related Disorders Conclusion, Resources and ReferencesDealing with the Effects of Trauma - A Self-Help Guide
More InformationLatest NewsQuestions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Anxiety Disorders
Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Addictions: Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Dissociative Disorders

Poor Sleep Worsens Link Between PTSD, Chronic Pain in Youth


HealthDay News
Updated: Feb 2nd 2018

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Poor sleep worsens the association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and chronic pain in youth, according to a study published in the January issue of the Journal of Pain.

Melanie Noel, Ph.D., from the University of Calgary in Canada, and colleagues assessed the role of sleep in the relationship between PTSD and pain in youth with chronic pain (97 participants; 10 to 17 years of age).

For youth with chronic pain, the researchers found that beyond the influence of demographic characteristics (age, race) and anxiety symptoms, sleep quality partially mediated the relationships between PTSD and pain intensity and interference. Higher levels of PTSD were linked to higher levels of pain intensity and pain interference. Poor sleep quality partially explained these relationships.

"Findings highlight the potential mechanistic role of sleep in explaining the co-occurrence of chronic pain and PTSD and suggest sleep might be an important target in future interventions," the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)