611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Small World? Not With One-Quarter Obese by 2045IBD Associated With Increased Risk of Parkinson's DiseaseBlue's Clues: Adding Dye to Colonoscopy May Boost DetectionHealth Concerns Rise Along With Hawaii EruptionsFDA OKs Doptelet for Liver Dz Patients Undergoing ProceduresEven a Mosquito's Spit May Help Make You SickFDA Approves Aimovig to Prevent MigrainesLower Vitamin D levels Linked to More Belly FatCan the Mediterranean Diet Protect Against Smog-Related Deaths?Many Parents Say Restaurant Fare Has Made Kids Sick: PollVarious Clinical Disturbances Precede MS DiagnosisFDA Approves First Drug Aimed at Preventing MigrainesAcute Kidney Injury in Hospital Ups Risk of Later Heart FailurePools, Hot Tubs Can Harbor Dangerous GermsAHA: 'Ideal' Heart Health Eludes More AmericansOrgans From Opioid OD Victims Are Saving Lives: StudyMore Cases in Lettuce-Linked E. Coli Outbreak, But End May Be NearFremanezumab Linked to Fewer Monthly Migraine DaysNew Rabies Test Could Save Lives, Maybe Even Minus the ShotsHealth Tip: Understanding Childhood ArthritisFDA Approves 'Biosimilar' Drug to Treat Certain Types of AnemiaColon Polyp Type May Be Key to Cancer Risk'BioSimilar' Drug Approved to Treat Certain Types of AnemiaHealth Tip: Taming a Pollen AllergyHealth Tip: Identifying Asthma Triggers'Superbug' Surfaces at Poultry Farm in ChinaSun's UV Rays a Threat to Your Eyes, TooMalnutrition Is Associated With Poor Prognosis in Heart FailureAntibiotics Tied to Higher Kidney Stone RiskMore Doubt Cast on Surgery for Spinal Compression FracturesObesity Might Raise Your Risk for A-fibAffected by the EpiPen Shortage? Here's What to DoIs Testing for Zika in U.S. Blood Supply Worth the Cost?FDA Permits Marketing of New Device for Treating GI BleedingPTSD May Raise Odds for Irregular HeartbeatNew Device Cleared for Gastrointestinal BleedingIf Kids Exposed to Pot, Tobacco Smoke, ER Visits RiseEven Mild Concussion Tied to Greater Dementia Risk LaterHealth Tip: Help Prevent E coli InfectionCBD Oil: All the Rage, But Is It Really Safe and Effective?Low Neighborhood Walkability Increases Risk of Asthma in KidsSleep-Deprived Kids at Risk of ObesityStudy IDs Pain Descriptors for Varying Stages of Low Back PainHealth Tip: Prepare for a ColonoscopyFurther Signs That Too Much Sitting Can Raise Clot RiskLightning Can Affect Deep Brain Stimulation DevicesThe Cold Truth About Migraine HeadachesHealth Tip: When To Call Your Doctor If You Have Lower Back PainSkin's 'Good' Bacteria May Be Promising Weapon Against EczemaFirst Death Reported in E. Coli Outbreak Tied to Romaine Lettuce
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Mom-to-Be's Immune Response May Trigger Zika Birth Defects

HealthDay News
by By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Jan 5th 2018

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Jan. 5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- Zika might not directly cause the miscarriages and birth defects that have been associated with the notorious virus, a new study in mice suggests.

Instead, the ravaging effects of Zika infection on a developing fetus appear to stem from the immune response of the expecting mother, researchers said.

Lab mice bred without a key step in their immune response wound up birthing pups that survived Zika infection, while normal mice either lost their pregnancy or produced very underweight pups, the study found.

"The antiviral response generated in response to Zika infection is causing the miscarriage of the fetus, as opposed to the virus itself," according to senior researcher Akiko Iwasaki. She is a professor of immunobiology at the Yale University School of Medicine. She is also an investigator for the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, in Chevy Chase, Md.

Iwasaki and her colleagues are now investigating whether a woman's immune response also causes some or all of the birth defects associated with Zika. One of the most serious of these birth defects is microcephaly, in which a newborn's brain and skull are severely underdeveloped.

The lab study revolved around a key signaling protein for the immune system, called type 1 interferon. The body produces type 1 interferon in response to a viral infection, and the protein in turn mounts a rapid and potent multipronged defense intended to keep the virus from spreading.

The researchers suspected that an interferon deficiency might explain why some pregnancies are more affected by Zika infection than others -- because, in those cases, the immune system would not respond as strongly to the infection.

To test this theory, they bred lab mice that lacked receptors for the immune protein.

"We thought the fetuses missing this interferon receptor would be more susceptible to death from Zika infection, and the fetuses that had the receptor signaling would be protected," Iwasaki said.

"What we found was quite the opposite," she said. "The fetuses unable to respond to interferon survived infection, and those that had the receptor, either they all died or were very small."

Mice and humans share many biological characteristics, which means that the response is likely to be the same in people, Iwasaki said.

However, research in animals frequently doesn't produce similar results in humans.

Exploring the matter further, the researchers cultured human placental tissue in the lab and then exposed the tissue to interferon, Iwasaki said. The cells wound up becoming deformed, featuring abnormal, knotty structures that previously have been linked to high-risk pregnancies.

According to Dr. Amesh Adalja, a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security in Baltimore, these findings open up a potential avenue for protecting the fetus of a woman infected with Zika.

"The consequences of any infectious disease are the result of an elaborate interaction between the immune system and the microbe, and it appears that Zika's impact on the fetus is another example of this phenomenon," he said. Adalja was not involved with the study but was familiar with the findings.

"Such a finding provides some basis for understanding if a therapeutic approach in which the effects of interferon are blocked might be beneficial," Adalja said.

Iwasaki, though, thinks this emphasizes the need for a Zika vaccine because "it's very tricky to treat women if they're already infected with the Zika virus," she said.

Instead, she thinks the real value in the study is a new understanding of how any viral infection might influence the health of a pregnancy.

"This has implications for other viral infections as well, because the same response would be generated for virtually every viral infection," Iwasaki said.

In particular, women with autoimmune disorders trying to have a baby could benefit from this research, Iwasaki said. These women aren't actually fighting off a virus, she explained, so interrupting their interferon immune response would not expose them to any harm and could preserve the health of their baby.

"If elevated interferon is a more general underlying mechanism for pregnancy complications, we might be able to interfere with the interferon signaling," Iwasaki said. "Because there's no viral infection to worry about, we might be able to help pregnancy carry through to term in those women who are suffering from autoimmune diseases."

The study was published in the Jan. 5 issue of the journal Science Immunology.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on Zika virus.