611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Injected Drug May Be New Weapon Against GoutCould Household Cleaners Make Your Kid Fat?Look for Early Signs of Thyroid Cancer, Experts UrgeHousehold Chemicals Tied to Kidney ProblemsAsthma-Obesity Link May Cut Both WaysNew Device Approved for Tears in Heart's Blood VesselsAHA: 5 Reasons You Could Develop Heart Disease Before 501 in 12 Americans Lives With Debilitating Chronic PainHealth Tip: Change Poor PostureAs Earth Warms, Heat-Related Deaths Will MultiplyALS Affects the Mind, Not Just the BodyNo Short-Term Cancer Risk From Recalled Heart Med Valsartan: StudyADHD Tied to Raised Risk of Early Parkinson'sObesity Tops 35 Percent in 7 U.S. States: ReportBlood Infection Sepsis Tied to Heart Attack, StrokeUrgent Care Centers Ease ER Burden in U.S.Health Tip: Maintain a Healthy Heart While on DialysisHealth Tip: Understanding Urinary IncontinenceStigma Another Burden for Many With PsoriasisSurprising Tactic in War Against Antibiotic ResistanceAHA: Heart Health Research of 9/11 Survivors Slowly Realized, 17 Years LaterOver 1.4 Billion of World's Adults Face Disease Because of Inactivity, WHO SaysHealth Tip: Prevent Back Pain at WorkNew Ebola Virus Found in BatsEven 'Good' Levels of Air Pollution Are Bad for SmokersStrain of E. Coli Spread From Poultry to People, Study SuggestsGene 'Editing' in Dog Study Shows Promise for Kids With Muscular DystrophyHealth Tip: Feeling Dizzy? When to See Your DoctorLow Back Pain? These Exercises May HelpEven at Low Levels, Toxic Metals Put Heart at Serious Risk: StudySleep Apnea Might Raise Odds for Painful GoutDrug for Spinal Muscular Atrophy May Help Older Children: StudyAncient Treatment May Help Fight 'Superbugs'Smoking, Drinking a Double Whammy for Teens' Arteries: StudyAlarming Rise in Antibiotic-Resistant UTIs in U.S.: StudyCould Too Much 'Good' HDL Cholesterol Be Bad for Your Heart?Study Finds Some Patients With A-Fib Have Hidden Brain DamageAHA: Bandmates in The War and Treaty Open Up About Health, HomelessnessFirst Drug Approved for Rare Eye DiseaseNew, Natural Pesticides Effective Against Mosquitoes: StudyDoctors Not Talking About Newer Meningitis VaccineAHA: 'Bad' Cholesterol Can Be Deadly in Otherwise Healthy PeopleHealth Tip: Keep Your Bladder Healthier4 Ways to Protect Your Child From Allergic Reactions at SchoolFDA Approves 1st Generic EpiPenThinning Retina Seen as Early Warning Sign for Parkinson'sSleep in Your Contacts, Risk Serious Eye Damage: CDCAHA: Wildfire Smoke Threatens Health of Those Near and FarStem Cells Restore Some Vision in Blind MiceHealth Tip: Are You at Risk for Macular Degeneration?
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

New Hope for Kids With Multiple Food Allergies

HealthDay News
by -- Mary Elizabeth Dallas
Updated: Dec 12th 2017

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Dec. 12, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A treatment for kids with more than one dangerous food allergy shows promise in early trials, researchers say.

Almost one-third of people with a food allergy have reactions to more than one type of food. This can increase the risk of accidental exposure and life-threatening anaphylaxis, according to researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine.

No treatment exists for multiple food allergies. Usually, patients are told to avoid the food triggers, but this requires constant attention to their diet.

"Patients find it very hard to live with multiple food allergies," said study senior author Dr. Sharon Chinthrajah. "It puts a huge social and economic burden on families."

In this new study, scientists combined the asthma drug omalizumab (Xolair) with immunotherapy for 48 children with more than one food allergy.

Immunotherapy exposes patients to tiny amounts of the foods that cause their allergic reactions. Gradually, the allergen dose is increased until the patient can tolerate normal amounts of the food.

Taking omalizumab appeared to speed up the desensitization process without sacrificing safety, the researchers said.

"This could be a very promising way to decrease the burden of living with food allergies," said Chinthrajah, director of clinical translational research at Stanford's Center for Allergy and Asthma Research.

Although the results are preliminary, they suggest that kids with multiple food allergies "might one day be safely desensitized to their trigger foods using this treatment combination," she said. Still, further research is needed to confirm the findings before the treatment becomes available.

The study participants were randomly assigned to receive the combined allergy treatment or a placebo. They were 4 to 15 years old and were allergic to a variety of foods, including almonds, cashews, eggs, hazelnuts, milk, peanuts, sesame, soy, walnuts and wheat.

The children received omalizumab or a placebo for eight weeks before starting immunotherapy and for eight weeks during combination treatment with immunotherapy for two to five trigger foods. The participants then continued immunotherapy without the drug for an additional 20 weeks.

The researchers found that 83 percent of the treatment group could tolerate a small dose of two food allergens versus 33 percent who took the placebo.

The study showed significant improvements in safety and effectiveness in multi-allergic patients treated with omalizumab and food immunotherapy, said study co-author Dr. Kari Nadeau.

"Omalizumab can help change the course of therapy by making it safer and faster," said Nadeau, a professor of medicine and of pediatrics.

The children who received the double treatment were desensitized to their food allergies faster than those taking the placebo and had fewer digestive and breathing issues, according to the researchers.

"Patients and families say they're so grateful. They can broaden their food variety and participate in more social activities without fear of a bad allergic reaction," Chinthrajah said.

"Kids say things like, 'I no longer sit at the allergen-free table at lunch; I can sit with my usual friends,' " Chinthrajah added. "These tiny things that others take for granted can open their social world."

The study was published online Dec. 11 in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology.

More information

The American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology provides more on food allergies.