611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Internet Addiction and Media Issues
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest NewsLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Impulse Control Disorders

Does All That Social Media Time Harm Young Minds?

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Nov 7th 2017

new article illustration

TUESDAY, Nov. 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, texting: Sometimes it seems today's young adults are online more often than not.

But new research suggests that the amount of time young adults spend on social media doesn't seem to affect their risk for mental health problems.

The finding came from a study of 467 young adults who were asked about how much time each day they used social media, the importance of it in their lives and the way they used it. They also were asked about mental health issues such as social anxiety, loneliness, decreased empathy and suicidal thoughts.

The researchers found little association between the amount of time spent on social media and mental health problems. The results were published online Nov. 1 in the journal Psychiatric Quarterly.

The only area of concern was what the researchers called "vaguebooking," which refers to social media posts that contain little actual and clear information but are worded in a way meant to trigger attention and concern in those who read the posts.

Young people who tended to write such posts were lonelier and had more suicidal thoughts than others, according to the study.

That finding suggests that "some forms of social media use may function as a 'cry for help' among individuals with pre-existing mental health problems," lead author Chloe Berryman, of the University of Central Florida, said in a journal news release.

"Overall, results from this study suggest that, with the exception of vaguebooking, concerns regarding social media use may be misplaced," she said.

"Our results are generally consistent with other studies which suggest that how people use social media is more critical than the actual time they spend online with regards to their mental health," Berryman concluded.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more on mental health.