611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Researchers ID Microbiome Genes Tied to AsthmaPlasma Rich in Growth Factors May Promote Hair RegenerationBest Practice Advice Issued for Hep B Vaccination, ScreeningIs a Common Shoulder Surgery Useless?NAFLD Linked to Smaller Total Cerebral Brain VolumeSalivary miRNAs Can ID Duration of Concussion SymptomsHigh Salt Intake Impacts Gut MicrobiomeSevere Psoriasis May Make Diabetes Increasingly LikelyNAFLD Linked to Increased Cancer Incidence RateSpinal Cord Stimulation May Reduce Neuropathic PainBrain Glucose Responses Diminish With Diabetes, ObesityMany Health Care Providers Work While SickIntensive BP Control Lacks Benefit in Chronic Kidney DiseaseGulf War Illness, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Are Distinct Disorders: Study'Boomers' Doing Better at Avoiding Eye Disease of AgingAHA: Supervised Exercise Ups 6-Minute Walking Distance in PADAccurate Diagnosis Seen With Photographs of Skin ConditionsModel Predicts Development of Chronic Kidney DiseaseNew Hemophilia Treatment Stems Bleeding EpisodesHealth Tip: If There's a Wildfire NearbyPeanut Patch Found Safe, Effective for Treating AllergiesWhy a Headache Feels So DrainingStaying Active May Lower Odds for GlaucomaHow to Do a Skin Cancer Body CheckCan Treating Gum Disease Keep Blood Pressure in Line?AHA/ACA Present New Blood Pressure GuidelinesAAO: Higher Exercise Intensity Tied to Reduced Risk of GlaucomaAAO: Intranasal Tear Neurostimulator Safe for Dry EyeOutcomes for Atrial Fibrillation Similar With Dabigatran, WarfarinOutbreaks Linked to Drinking Water Mainly Due to LegionellaIs Low-Dose Aspirin Right for You After Surgery?Swings in Blood Pressure Can Pose Long-Term DangersAHA: Acetylcysteine, Sodium Bicarbonate Don't Cut Renal RiskBinge-Watchers, Beware: Long TV Time Poses Clot RiskObesity to Blame for Epidemic of Knee Dislocations, ComplicationsThe Heart Risks of a Desk JobCould Fish Oil, Vitamin D Help Ease Lupus?Smog May Harm Your Bones, TooOverlapping Surgery Appears Safe in Neurosurgical ProceduresAdding Exercise to Compression Therapy Promising for Leg UlcersRisk of End-Stage Renal Disease Low With Type 1 DiabetesHealth Tip: What's Healthy Blood Pressure?'Old' Lungs May Be Good Transplant OptionsHPV Vaccine Linked to Drop in Cases of Rare Childhood DiseaseNeurologic Abnormalities Identified After West Nile VirusSodium Oxybate Promising for Parkinson's, Daytime SleepinessDrop in Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease Due to DiabetesThese Foods May Help Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis PainWhat Really Works to Fight a Stubborn Cough?West Nile's Long-Term Bite: Impact on Brain May Last Years
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Stem Cell Factor Tied to Reduced Risk of Cardiac Events, Death


HealthDay News
Updated: Aug 31st 2017

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Aug. 31, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- High levels of stem cell factor (SCF) are associated with reduced risk of mortality and cardiovascular events, according to a study published online Aug. 26 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

Harry Björkbacka, Ph.D., from Lund University in Sweden, and colleagues examined the correlation between circulating levels of SCF and risk for development of cardiovascular events and death. SCF was analyzed from plasma from 4,742 participants in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study; participants were followed for a mean of 19.2 years.

The researchers found that participants with high baseline levels of SCF had lower cardiovascular and all-cause mortality and reduced risk of heart failure, stroke, and myocardial infarction. There was a correlation for smoking, diabetes, and high alcohol consumption with lower levels of SCF. After adjustment for traditional cardiovascular risk factors, the highest versus the lowest SCF quartile remained independently associated with lower risk of cardiovascular (hazard ratio, 0.59; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.43 to 0.81) and all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.68; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.57 to 0.81) and with lower risk of heart failure (hazard ratio, 0.5; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.31 to 0.8) and stroke (hazard ratio, 0.66; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.47 to 0.92) but not myocardial infarction (hazard ratio, 0.96; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.72 to 1.27).

"The findings provide clinical support for a protective role of SCF in maintaining cardiovascular integrity," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)