611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Health Tip: Prevent Respiratory InfectionsThanksgiving Overeating Could Spell Kidney ProblemsResearchers ID Microbiome Genes Tied to AsthmaPlasma Rich in Growth Factors May Promote Hair RegenerationBest Practice Advice Issued for Hep B Vaccination, ScreeningIs a Common Shoulder Surgery Useless?NAFLD Linked to Smaller Total Cerebral Brain VolumeSalivary miRNAs Can ID Duration of Concussion SymptomsHigh Salt Intake Impacts Gut MicrobiomeSevere Psoriasis May Make Diabetes Increasingly LikelyNAFLD Linked to Increased Cancer Incidence RateSpinal Cord Stimulation May Reduce Neuropathic PainBrain Glucose Responses Diminish With Diabetes, ObesityMany Health Care Providers Work While SickIntensive BP Control Lacks Benefit in Chronic Kidney DiseaseGulf War Illness, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Are Distinct Disorders: Study'Boomers' Doing Better at Avoiding Eye Disease of AgingAHA: Supervised Exercise Ups 6-Minute Walking Distance in PADAccurate Diagnosis Seen With Photographs of Skin ConditionsModel Predicts Development of Chronic Kidney DiseaseNew Hemophilia Treatment Stems Bleeding EpisodesHealth Tip: If There's a Wildfire NearbyPeanut Patch Found Safe, Effective for Treating AllergiesWhy a Headache Feels So DrainingStaying Active May Lower Odds for GlaucomaHow to Do a Skin Cancer Body CheckCan Treating Gum Disease Keep Blood Pressure in Line?AHA/ACA Present New Blood Pressure GuidelinesAAO: Higher Exercise Intensity Tied to Reduced Risk of GlaucomaAAO: Intranasal Tear Neurostimulator Safe for Dry EyeOutcomes for Atrial Fibrillation Similar With Dabigatran, WarfarinOutbreaks Linked to Drinking Water Mainly Due to LegionellaIs Low-Dose Aspirin Right for You After Surgery?Swings in Blood Pressure Can Pose Long-Term DangersAHA: Acetylcysteine, Sodium Bicarbonate Don't Cut Renal RiskBinge-Watchers, Beware: Long TV Time Poses Clot RiskObesity to Blame for Epidemic of Knee Dislocations, ComplicationsThe Heart Risks of a Desk JobCould Fish Oil, Vitamin D Help Ease Lupus?Smog May Harm Your Bones, TooOverlapping Surgery Appears Safe in Neurosurgical ProceduresAdding Exercise to Compression Therapy Promising for Leg UlcersRisk of End-Stage Renal Disease Low With Type 1 DiabetesHealth Tip: What's Healthy Blood Pressure?'Old' Lungs May Be Good Transplant OptionsHPV Vaccine Linked to Drop in Cases of Rare Childhood DiseaseNeurologic Abnormalities Identified After West Nile VirusSodium Oxybate Promising for Parkinson's, Daytime SleepinessDrop in Incidence of End-Stage Renal Disease Due to DiabetesThese Foods May Help Ease Rheumatoid Arthritis Pain
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Many Under 40 May Not Need Regular Cholesterol Checks: Study

HealthDay News
by By Amy NortonHealthDay Reporter
Updated: May 15th 2017

new article illustration

MONDAY, May 15, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many adults under 40 may not need to have routine cholesterol screenings, a new study suggests.

To come to this conclusion, the researchers looked at the real world implications of two conflicting sets of guidelines on cholesterol testing.

One, from the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA), says that all adults older than 20 should have a cholesterol screening. They also suggest a repeat test every four to six years.

The other guidelines come from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force, a government-funded, independent panel of medical experts. They say many adults can go longer before their first cholesterol test -- until age 35 for men, and age 45 for women.

The exception would be people with a major risk factor for heart problems -- such as high blood pressure, smoking or a family history of early heart disease.

Those patients can start cholesterol testing at age 20, the task force adds.

The new findings support the "more targeted" approach the task force uses, according to lead researcher Dr. Krishna Patel, of Saint Luke's Health System in Kansas City, Mo.

Why? The study, Patel explained, tried to estimate the impact of the two different guidelines in the "real world."

To do that, the researchers used data on 9,600 U.S. adults aged 30 to 49 who were part of a government health study.

The study team found that among nonsmokers with normal blood pressure, very few were at heightened risk of suffering a heart attack in the next 10 years. That means very few would be considered candidates for a cholesterol-lowering statin -- even with elevated LDL (so-called "bad" cholesterol) levels.

"So, screening cholesterol early doesn't bring much actionable information," Patel said. "If we're not going to treat, there's no point in doing it."

The study was published May 15 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Others disagreed with Patel's point.

The point of screening younger adults is not so doctors can put them all on statins, said Dr. Neil Stone, one of the authors of the ACC/AHA guidelines.

Instead, there are two central reasons, Stone explained.

One is to spot younger adults who may be heading down a path toward heart disease later in life.

Once they know their LDL is high, they and their doctors can have an "all-important discussion" about diet and lifestyle changes, said Stone, who is also professor of medicine at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago.

The other reason is to catch cases of familial hypercholesterolemia, a genetic condition that causes very high LDL levels (above 190 mg/dL), he said.

People with the condition have a much higher-than-average risk of heart disease, and often develop it at a young age.

Because of that, the condition should be treated with statins, according to the ACC/AHA.

There is "strong and compelling evidence," Stone said, that catching the condition in younger adults makes a difference.

Dr. Paul Ridker, who wrote an editorial accompanying the study, had a similar view.

"Familial hypercholesterolemia is a common disorder, and it's easy to detect," said Ridker, of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. "Why delay something as simple and inexpensive as a cholesterol test?"

Plus, he said, catching even "run-of-the-mill" high LDL is important.

"Knowing about it early in life can be a good motivator to make lifestyle changes," Ridker said.

What if a young adult has healthy LDL levels? Ridker said he'd be "fine" with that patient forgoing further tests until later in life.

For her part, Patel agreed that a one-time check, to catch familial hypercholesterolemia, is a wise move for young adults. But she questioned the value of repeat testing.

According to Stone, the ACC/AHA guidelines say it's "reasonable" to repeat cholesterol testing every four to six years. "It's not mandatory," he noted.

But people's lives, and heart disease risk factors, change as they move through adulthood, Stone said. So, a periodic cholesterol check can be useful when it's done as part of a "global risk assessment" where doctors look at blood pressure, smoking habits and other major risk factors for heart disease.

Motivating younger adults to get those risk factors under control is critical, according to Stone. "We know it's a big deal if you can have optimal risk factor [control] by age 45 or 50," he said.

In the study, very few people were at elevated risk of heart attack -- as long as they didn't smoke or have high blood pressure. ("Elevated" meant a greater than 5 percent chance of having a heart attack in the next 10 years.)

In the absence of those two risk factors, only 0.09 percent of men younger than 40 were at elevated risk of heart attack. And only 0.04 percent of women younger than 50 were.

But smoking, in particular, changed everything: Among male smokers in their 40s, one-half to three-quarters were at elevated risk of a heart attack.

"Smoking had a huge effect," Patel said. Smokers, she stressed, should "definitely" have their cholesterol tested -- and, more importantly, quit the habit.

More information

The American Heart Association has more on managing cholesterol.