611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Child & Adolescent Development: Overview
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Don't Rely on Just One Blood Pressure Test for Kids: StudyFrom Birth On, One Sex Is HardierHealth Tip: Talk to Your Youngster About AdoptionFor Kids, Chronic Illness May Trigger Mental Health IssuesGrandparents Help Shape Kids' Views on AgingPrenatal PPI, H2 Blocker Use Linked to Asthma Risk in ChildAs CHIP Money Runs Out, Millions of U.S. Kids May Lose Health CarePsoriasis Is Independent Risk Factor for Comorbidity in ChildrenFDA Bans Use of Opioid-Containing Cough Meds by KidsSchool-Based Telemedicine Asthma Management Is EffectiveAcetaminophen in Pregnancy Tied to Language Delays -- in One SexIs Surgery Riskier for Black Children?Mental Disorders Common in Kids With Chronic Physical ConditionsIs Your Child Ready for a Smartphone?What to Do if Your Child Has ChickenpoxChild Death Rate Higher in U.S. Than Other Wealthy NationsThe Opioid Crisis' Hidden Victims: Children in Foster CareApple Investors Press for Parental Controls on iPhonesSpike Seen in Kids' Eye Injuries From BB, Paintball GunsFewer of America's Poor Kids Are Becoming ObeseRespiratory Virus Lurks as Wintertime WorryExercise Boosts Kids' Brain Health, TooHealth Tip: Talking to Your Children About DivorceSleep May Mediate Fish-Cognition Relationship in ChildrenHealth Tip: Schooling While Managing CancerGetting to the Root of Sibling RivalryHealth Tip: Play Safer With Laser ToysCan Eating Fish Make Kids Smarter?Heavy Particles in Smog Up Kids' Asthma RiskReining in Kids' Expectations for Holiday GiftsCan the Fill-In Babysitter Handle an Emergency?Overweight Kids Don't Have to Be Overweight AdultsDon't Play Around When It Comes to Toy SafetyChildhood Trauma May Harm the Heart Decades LaterTougher State Laws Curb Vaccine RefusersKeep Kids Safe During Holiday TravelsToo Much Takeout Food Threatens Kids' HealthMom-to-Be's High Blood Sugar May Raise Baby's Odds for Heart DefectsFamily Meals Serve Up Better Behaved KidsTech at Bedtime May Mean Heavier KidsNew Hope for Kids With Multiple Food AllergiesHeath Tip: Give Age-Appropriate ToysPrenatal Sugar Intake May Increase Asthma Risk in OffspringMoms' Soda Habit in Pregnancy May Boost Kids' Odds for AsthmaPreventing Childhood Accidents at HomeDating Violence Tied to Spankings in ChildhoodSmartphone Pics Help Docs ID Kids' Skin ConditionMore Than Half Today's Children Expected to Be Obese at 35Time Management for Busy Families60 Percent of U.S. Kids Could Be Obese by Age 35
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

ADHD: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
Childhood Mental Disorders and Illnesses
Parenting
Child Care
Child Development & Parenting: Infants (0-2)
Child Development & Parenting: Early (3-7)

Don't Give Kids Medicines With Codeine, Tramadol: FDA

HealthDay News
by By Dennis Thompson
HealthDay Reporter
Updated: Apr 20th 2017

new article illustration

THURSDAY, April 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Parents shouldn't give their children any medications containing the narcotics codeine or tramadol because they can cause life-threatening breathing problems, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warned Thursday.

Warning labels on medications with codeine or tramadol will be strengthened to reflect these potential dangers, the FDA said in a statement.

Nursing mothers should also avoid using these drugs, since they can pass unsafe levels of opioids to their babies through their breast milk, the agency said.

Some children and adults are genetically predisposed to process opioid drugs more quickly, the FDA said. That can cause the level of narcotics in the bloodstream to rise too high and too quickly, risking overdose in children, due to their smaller size.

"It's very hard to determine which child or mother has this risk, so that's why we've taken this action today," Dr. Douglas Throckmorton, deputy center director for regulatory programs at the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, said in a media briefing Thursday.

Tramadol is a prescription drug that is only approved to treat pain in adults, the agency noted. Codeine products are available by prescription, with some states allowing the drug to be sold over the counter. Codeine is often combined with acetaminophen in prescription pain medicines and cough syrups, the agency said.

The FDA is now warning against children under 12 taking either codeine or tramadol.

Kids under 18 also should not be given tramadol to treat pain following surgery to remove the tonsils or adenoids, the agency said. Codeine labeling already warns against post-surgical use for kids.

Finally, the FDA said that these drugs should not be used in children 12 to 18 who are obese, suffer from obstructive sleep apnea or have a weakened respiratory system, as they can increase the chances of dangerous breathing problems.

"Today's actions build on a better understanding of this very serious safety issue, based on the latest evidence," Throckmorton said.

The FDA plans to hold a public advisory committee meeting later this year to discuss the broader use of prescription opioid cough and cold medicine in children, he said.

Nearly 1.9 million kids aged 18 or younger received a prescription for a codeine-containing medication in 2014, and nearly 167,000 were prescribed a medication containing tramadol, the FDA said.

Parents should carefully read drug labels to make sure medications don't contain either opioid, the agency stressed. They also can ask their doctor or pharmacist if a specific medication contains codeine or tramadol.

Parents should also discuss alternative pain medications for their kids with their doctors, as well as effective cough and cold remedies that do not contain opioids, the FDA said.

"We understand there are limited options when it comes to treating pain and cough in children," Throckmorton said. "However, after careful review our decision to require these labeling updates was taken because we believe it is a way we can protect children."

More information

For more on opioid medications in children, visit the Boston Children's Hospital.