611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
H. Pylori Infection Found to Be Related to Gallbladder DiseasesExcess Weight May Raise Rosacea RiskDecline in Antibiotic Use in Livestock Isn't Enough, Critics SayCould a Hot Cup of Tea Preserve Your Vision?Breathing Retraining Beneficial in Patients With AsthmaZika Babies Facing Increasing Health Problems With AgeHealth Tip: Dental Association Supports Fluoridated WaterAnother Legacy of Terror Attacks: MigrainesRain May Not Cause Achy Joints After AllDisrupted Sleep Linked to Increased Amyloid-β ProductionAtherosclerosis ID'd in Many Without CV Risk FactorsArtificial Intelligence Promising for CA, Retinopathy DiagnosesFirst Drug Approved for Rare Condition That Inflames Blood VesselsProtecting Your Health From Wildfire SmokeHealth Tip: Recognize Warning Signs of HypothermiaNew Hope for Kids With Multiple Food AllergiesFew Patients, Providers Discuss Costs of Glaucoma Medicationsβ-Cell Sensitivity to Glucose Impaired After Gastric BypassHow to Perk Up the Holidays for Hospital PatientsVigorous Exercise May Help Slow Parkinson's DiseaseIf Mom Has Rheumatoid Arthritis, Baby May Develop It, TooNew Gene Therapy May Be Cure for 'Bubble Boy' DiseaseAnother Gene Therapy Breakthrough Against HemophiliaPrenatal Sugar Intake May Increase Asthma Risk in OffspringObesity May Be Tied to Higher Rosacea Risk in WomenGot Scabies? Here's What to DoAre Women With Parkinson's at a Disadvantage?Bariatric Surgery Alters Liver Fatty Acid MetabolismORBIT Bleeding Risk Score Performs Best in A-FibHealth Tip: Prevent the Spread of NorovirusAre Good Kidneys Going to Waste?Metabolic Risk Factors Linked to Severe Liver DiseaseImpaired White Matter Integrity for Depression in Parkinson'sHave Eczema? No Need for Bleach Baths, Study SuggestsPowerful Clot-Busting Drugs Not Useful After Leg Blockages: StudyComing Soon: A Gel That Could Help Save Soldiers' EyesGene Therapy May Allow Hemophilia Patients to Go Without MedsThyroidectomy-Specific Quality Improvement Measures ID'dPatients OK With Fewer Opioids After Gallbladder SurgeryShhhh! Patients Are SleepingDiagnostic Mutations ID'd in Chronic Kidney Disease PatientsAntithrombotics Deemed Safe in Carpal Tunnel Release SurgeryLink Between Diabetes, Antibiotic Use Called Into QuestionHealth Tip: Diagnosing PneumoniaNoisy Commutes Could Cause Long-Lasting DamageThe Buzz on How Flies Spread DiseaseRisk of Surgical Complications Up for Overlapping Hip SurgeryOral Microbiome Composition Linked to Esophageal Cancer RiskSmartphone Pics Help Docs ID Kids' Skin ConditionEven Non-Heart Surgery May Harm Your Heart
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Could a Daily Vitamin Curb Smog's Effect on the Heart?

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Apr 14th 2017

new article illustration

FRIDAY, April 14, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- There's a lot of evidence to show that breathing in dirty air can harm your heart. But a small new study suggests that daily vitamin B supplements might counteract that effect.

While two hours of exposure to concentrated air pollution had a negative effect on heart rate and levels of illness-fighting white blood cells, "these effects are nearly reversed with four-week B-vitamin supplementation," according to study co-author Dr. Andrea Baccarelli. He's chair of environmental health sciences at Columbia University in New York City.

One lung health expert was cautiously optimistic about the findings.

"It is interesting that pretreating with B vitamins may prevent some of the deleterious effects of exposure to this pollution," said Dr. Alan Mensch, senior vice president of medical affairs at Northwell Heath's Plainview Hospital in Plainview, N.Y.

"It must be kept in mind, however, that since this study only included 10 healthy patients, it might not be applicable to an entire population," he added. Plus, preventing air pollution in the first place "takes precedent over developing methods to prevent its deleterious effects," he said.

The new research involved 10 healthy nonsmokers, aged 18 to 60, who took a placebo for four weeks before being exposed to fine-particulate air pollution for two hours.

The "fine particulates" -- microscopic specks -- were 2.5 micrometers in diameter, the researchers said.

Inhalable particles that are "2.5 micrometers or smaller are potentially the most dangerous form of air pollution due to their ability to penetrate deep in the lungs and adjacent bloodstream," Mensch explained. Once inhaled, "they can travel to various organs throughout the body," he added, causing inflammation and ill effects on cardiovascular health.

"Populations exposed to high particulate-associated air pollution have increased heart attacks, lung cancer, DNA mutations, and premature births and deaths," Mensch said.

Overall, fine-particle pollution contributes to 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide each year, mainly through harm to the cardiovascular system. This type of air pollution is believed to be the most common trigger for heart attack, the study authors noted.

But could a simple daily vitamin supplement help curb this smog-linked damage?

To find out, Baccarelli's group gave the 10 participants vitamin B supplements for four weeks before again exposing them to the fine-particle air pollution for another two hours.

This time, the vitamin B supplements were linked to a near-reversal of the negative effects of the pollution on the volunteers' cardiovascular and immune systems, the researchers said. This included healthy changes in each person's heart rate and their white blood cell levels.

Baccarelli stressed that preventing pollution should always be the first measure in safeguarding people's health, however.

"Pollution regulation remains the backbone of public health protection against its cardiovascular health effects," he said in a university news release. "Studies like ours cannot diminish -- nor be used to underemphasize -- the urgent need to lower air pollution levels to -- at a minimum -- meet the air-quality standards set forth in the United States and other countries."

Another lung expert agreed that the vitamin supplements could help blunt the health effects of dirty air.

The new study is "evidence that vitamin B provides benefits against the development of atherosclerosis in healthy adults who are exposed to air pollution," said Dr. Len Horovitz, a pulmonary specialist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City.

While it remains unclear just how the supplement works in this regard, "this finding recommends vitamin B, which is of course safe and has no side effects, as a buffer against coronary artery disease," Horovitz said.

The study was published online recently in the journal Scientific Reports.

More information

The California Environmental Protection Agency has more on the health effects of air pollution.