611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Streptococcal Throat Infection Linked to Mental DisordersCognitive Decline Linked to Visual Field VariabilityRiboflavin Shows Positive Effect for Migraine in AdultsPromising Results for Drug to Fight Arthritis Linked to PsoriasisKidneys From Deceased Diabetics Might Ease Organ Shortage: StudyNew Cholesterol Fighting Meds Target Key GeneEye Problems May Be Tied to Zika, Lab Study SuggestsATS: Bronchial Thermoplasty Has Lasting Benefits for AsthmaSleepless Nights Could Pose Heart Risk DangersHospital Protocol Helps Thwart Serious InfectionZika Arrived in Florida at Least Four Different WaysKnow the Signs of Thyroid TroubleStudies Spotlight Diet, Supplements for Knee PainFunctional Interaction Seen for Dietary Carbohydrates With AMDTaking Opioids Before Knee Surgery Could Raise Pain LaterATS: First Abx Rx Doesn't Work for ~25% of Pneumonia CasesActemra Approved for Certain Blood Vessel InflammationStudy Casts Doubt on Need for Statins in the 'Healthy Old'First-Try Antibiotics Now Fail in 1 in 4 Adult Pneumonia CasesOvercrowded ERs Risky for Some Seriously Ill PatientsHigh Vitamin K1 Intake Linked to Reduced Cataract RiskPoverty Could Make Lupus Even WorseCDC: Crypto Outbreaks Linked to Pools Have Doubled Since 2014Could Cancer Drug Gleevec Help With Severe Asthma?Zika Mosquito Can Transmit Other Viruses, TooFDA OKs Kalydeco for Additional Mutations in Cystic FibrosisKalydeco Approval Widened for More Types of Cystic FibrosisAnother Step Toward Ebola ProtectionThe Water's Not Fine: U.S. Pool-Linked Infection Doubles in 2 YearsJust 2 Weeks on the Couch Can Trigger Body's DeclineGene Therapy Might Someday Mend Badly Broken Bones'Healthy Obese' May Be a MythNo Evidence Steroids Benefit Symptomatic Knee OsteoarthritisHeart Attack Risk Spikes After Respiratory Infection, Study FindsFor Inflamed Pancreas, Eating Right Away May Be Best MedicineFindings Support More Targeted Approach to Cholesterol ScreensHouston, You Have a 'Superbug'Forget Steroid Shots for Long-Term Relief of Arthritic KneesFDA Approves New Device to Treat Esophageal AtresiaMany U.S. Travelers Skip Measles Shots, Despite Infection RiskMany Under 40 May Not Need Regular Cholesterol Checks: StudyNew Device Approved for Esophageal Birth DefectACP: Recommendations Updated for Low Bone Density TreatmentMosquito-Borne Illnesses May Not Be Limited to TropicsArthroscopy for Degenerative Knees Deemed Seldom EffectiveBioengineered Intraabdominal Endocrine Pancreas FeasibleAllergies Getting Worse? Blame Climate ChangeA 2nd Life for Risky Kidney Transplants?Blood Vessel-Clearing Procedure Riskier on Weekends: StudyMultidrug-Resistant TB Set to Increase Through 2040
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

Findings Support More Targeted Approach to Cholesterol Screens


HealthDay News
Updated: May 16th 2017

new article illustration

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of elevated cardiovascular risk is low in normotensive, nonsmoking women younger than 50 years and men younger than 40 years, according to a study published online May 16 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Krishna Patel, M.D., of Saint Luke's Health System in Kansas City, Mo., and colleagues analyzed data on 9,608 U.S. adults aged 30 to 49 who were part of a government health study. The team sought to evaluate the prevalence of elevated atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk among adults without diabetes who were younger than 50 years.

The researchers found that among nonsmokers with normal blood pressure, very few were at heightened risk of ASCVD in the next 10 years. These findings held true as long as they didn't smoke or have high blood pressure. In the absence of those two risk factors, 0.09 percent of men younger than 40 were at elevated risk, while 0.04 percent of women younger than 50 were. Among male smokers in their 40s, one-half to three-quarters were at elevated risk.

"Given the low prevalence of patients at elevated cardiovascular risk, our findings would support the targeted approach of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force over the more general screening of the American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association," the authors write.

Abstract/Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)