611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Wellness and Personal Development
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
You're Less Apt to Fact-Check 'Fake News' When It's on Social Media: StudyDoes Dirty Air Keep You Awake?Cut Calories, Lengthen Life Span?How Not to Nod Off Behind the WheelWomen Aren't Better at Reading People's Faces After AllAre You Addicted to Your Smartphone?Just Two Weeks of Inactivity Can Up Risk of Developing DiseaseJust 2 Weeks on the Couch Can Trigger Body's DeclineSunscreen 101Fido or Fluffy Can Bring You a Big Health BoostHealth Tip: Sleep is Important for MemoryJust 5 Percent of Daily Salt Gets Added at the TableMany Seniors Use Cellphones While Driving With ChildrenLongevity in the U.S.: Location, Location, LocationGluten-Free Diet Not Healthy for Patients Without Celiac DiseaseStriving for Facebook 'Likes' May Not Boost Your Self-EsteemEating Gluten-Free Without a Medical Reason?Life Expectancy Goes Up for Black AmericansHealthy Heart in Middle Age Delivers Big DividendsCooking at Home Means Eating Better, Spending LessMost Seniors Use Cellphones While Behind the WheelTaking the Stairs a Better Pick-Me-Up Than CoffeeHealth Tip: How to Get Enough Vitamin DHealth Tip: Better Sleep, a Better LifeThe Top 5 Conditions That Shorten Americans' Lives -- And Are Preventable4 in 10 Americans Still Breathe Dirty AirDon't Let Bugs Dampen Your Outdoor FunPeripheral Vision Varies From Person to Person'I'm Just Too Busy' -- Is Being Overworked the New Status Symbol?Americans Are Spending Billions Nipping and TuckingThese 5 Life Skills Can Boost Your Odds of Well-BeingDon't Bank on Heart-Rate Accuracy From Your Activity TrackerHow to Protect Yourself From Air PollutionGood Sleep Does Get Tougher With AgeGuys, a Good Night's Sleep Might Save Your LifeHealth Tip: Overcoming Dental AnxietyHealth Tip: Spring Cleaning?Health Tip: Talk to Your Doctor About Emotional StrugglesNeed More Zzzzz's?Single Dose of SSRI Prompted Healthy Food Choices During TestDaily Glass of Beer, Wine Might Do a Heart GoodShorter Winter, Longer Spring?Health Tip: Stay Focused on the HighwayHealth Tip: Don't Contaminate Contact LensesParenthood an Elixir for Longevity?Your DNA May Determine How You Handle the Time ChangeHow to Keep a Spring in Your Step With Daylight Saving Time'Pokemon Go' Players Add 2,000 Steps a DayFewer Americans Actively Trying to Lose WeightCan Social Media Sites Leave You Socially Isolated?
LinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Smoking
Anger Management
Stress Reduction and Management

Sunscreen 101

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: May 16th 2017

new article illustration

TUESDAY, May 16, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Many people make mistakes when using sunscreen that could increase their risk of skin cancer, a new study suggests.

Researchers set up free sunscreen dispensers at the Minnesota State Fair and watched as nearly 2,200 people used them.

The researchers found that only 33 percent of people applied sunscreen to all exposed skin. Only 38 percent were wearing sun-protective clothing, hats or sunglasses. Also, use of the free sunscreen dispensers fell sharply on cloudy days, the researchers reported.

The study was published online May 16 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

"These results highlight some of the ways people use sunscreen incorrectly," study author Dr. Ingrid Polcari said in a journal news release. She is an assistant professor in the department of dermatology at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

"To get the best possible sun protection, it's important to wear protective clothing, such as long-sleeved shirts and pants, and to apply sunscreen to all exposed skin, not just your face and arms," Polcari explained.

"Everyone should apply sunscreen every time they go outside," she added. "Even on cloudy days, up to 80 percent of the sun's harmful UV rays can reach your skin."

The study also found that more women than men took advantage of the free sunscreen. Fifty-one percent of fairgoers were women, but they accounted for 57 percent of the free sunscreen users.

"Research has shown that women are more likely than men to use sunscreen, but it's vital that men use it, too," said Dr. Darrell Rigel, a clinical professor in the department of dermatology at New York University.

"Men over 50 have a higher risk than the general population of developing melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, and UV exposure is the most preventable skin cancer risk factor, so it's important for men of all ages to protect themselves from the sun's harmful rays by seeking shade, wearing protective clothing and applying sunscreen," Rigel said.

When choosing a sunscreen, Rigel suggests the following tips:

  • Choose a sunscreen with an SPF 30 or higher. A sunscreen with SPF 30 blocks 97 percent of the sun's UVB rays.
  • Look for the words "broad spectrum." This means the sunscreen protects against both UVA rays (which cause premature skin aging) and UVB rays (which cause sunburn). Both types of UV rays can lead to skin cancer.
  • Look for the words "water resistant." Water-resistant sunscreens can provide protection for wet or sweaty skin for 40 or 80 minutes. All sunscreens should be reapplied every two hours, or after swimming or sweating.
  • For sensitive skin, choose a sunscreen with zinc oxide or titanium dioxide. People with sensitive skin also should avoid sunscreens that contain fragrance, oils and para-aminobenzoic acid, also known as PABA.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on sun safety.