611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Health Sciences
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Virtual House Calls for Speedy, Effective Parkinson's CareSeven Imaging Biomarkers Tied to Cognition in Male FightersDiabetes Drug Shows Promise Against Parkinson'sCombined MRI Might Help Predict Brain Damage in BoxersMedical Reality Catches Up to Science FictionNoninvasive Brain Test May Pinpoint Type of DementiaIn Mice, Brain Cells Discovered That Might Control AgingScans May Show Consciousness in 'Comatose' PatientsBoxers, MMA Fighters May Face Long-Term Harm to Brain: StudyFDA Panel OKs What May Soon Be First Gene Therapy Approved in U.S.Early Parkinson's May Prompt Vision ProblemsWhole-Genome Sequencing of Uncertain Clinical UtilityCould Shift Work Damage Your DNA?Gene Sequencing May Reveal Risks for Rare DiseasesRogue Genes May Cause Some ALS CasesSticky Brain 'Plaques' Implicated in Alzheimer's AgainEven Your Bones Can Get Fat, Mouse Study SuggestsDoes a Low-Fat Dairy Habit Boost Parkinson's Risk?MicroRNA Biomarker Signature Identified for Allergic AsthmaHaywire Immune Cells May Help Cause BaldnessRegion in Brain Associated With Fear of Uncertain FutureBrain Scans Spot Where Fear and Anxiety LiveGene Therapy Might Someday Mend Badly Broken BonesLife Expectancy Slighter Shorter With Parkinson's, DementiaStudy Looks at Parkinson's Effect on Life SpanBody Cooling May Help Brain After Cardiac ArrestDo You Overeat? Your Brain Wiring May Be WhyGene Mutation May Speed Alzheimer's DeclineIs This Enzyme Making You Fat?Type 2 Diabetes May Be Bad for Brain Health'Brain Age' May Help Predict When You'll DieParkinson's Disease May Originate in Gut, Study SaysBlood-Based Genome Testing Feasible for Rapid Mutation AssayBlood Test May Gauge Death Risk After Surgery150-Year-Old Drug May Shorten 'Off' Time for Parkinson's PatientsBrain May Be Organized by Functions, Not Body PartsBody Temperature Might Give Clues to ComaCould Young Blood Boost the Aging Brain?A 'Brainwave' to Help Fight PTSDDizziness in Parkinson's May Be Due to Cerebral HypoperfusionMisunderstood Gene Tests May Lead to Unnecessary MastectomiesScientists Extend Lives of Mice With ALSFDA Approves 1st Direct-to-Consumer Genetic Risk TestsFDA OKs 1st At-Home Genetic Tests for 10 Disorders'SuperAgers' Have Less Whole-Brain Cortical Volume LossHigh Thyroid Hormone Levels Tied to Stiffer ArteriesBrain Changes May Mark Risk of Financial Exploitation in SeniorsRegular Exercise Slows Decline Even in Advanced Parkinson's DzBrain-Computer Link Restores Some Movement to Quadraplegic ManScientists Spot Gene for Rare Disorder Causing Deafness, Blindness
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Mental Disorders
Mental Health Professions

Do You Overeat? Your Brain Wiring May Be Why

HealthDay News
by By Alan MozesHealthDay Reporter
Updated: May 9th 2017

new article illustration

TUESDAY, May 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- A new brain scan study suggests that people whose brains are wired to produce a more muted response to food may ultimately compensate by eating more, thereby raising their risk for obesity.

The new study also unearthed possible evidence of a gender divide in the way men and women process the experience of eating. Women's brains, it appears, may favor a more emotional response to the eating experience, while men are built to focus on how food satisfies the senses.

If so, such brain-wiring differences might explain why women struggle with weight more than men do, the researchers said.

"At this point, these are only speculations which need to be tested in future experiments," stressed study co-author Arpana Gupta. She is an assistant professor with UCLA's Ingestive Behavior and Obesity Program in the Center for Neurobiology of Stress and Resilience.

But "considerable sex-related differences have previously been identified in factors driving craving and drug-seeking in substance abuse," added Gupta.

This latest investigation analyzed brain scans of 86 healthy men and women to "identify the possible role of the brain in the pathophysiology of obesity," she explained.

In particular, the research team tried to track how eating affected activity patterns of the neurotransmitter dopamine, a so-called "reward" chemical that is critical to the way the brain responds to both satiety (eating) and deprivation (hunger).

The initial finding was that having "a less responsive dopamine system" appears to make both men and women less sensitive to food, and thereby "more prone to food intake in order to compensate for this deficit," Gupta said.

Translation: People who register a relatively subdued reaction to eating tend to eat more.

But the really "striking" finding, said Gupta, was an indication that men and women are simply wired differently when it comes to responses to eating.

A woman's brain seems to draw a significant neurological link between food and the part of the brain that processes emotions, Gupta said.

Possible proof of that link was seen among obese female participants.

Those women tended to exhibit a relatively muted response to food in brain regions that regulate emotion. That dynamic was not seen among obese men.

In contrast, a man's brain seems more inclined to link eating to the region that handles things like smell, temperature or taste. And obese men tended to have a relatively amped up response to food in brain regions involved in sensory regulation. That dynamic was not seen among obese women.

As to what might explain why men and women process eating so differently, Gupta said the jury is still out.

"This is a difficult question to answer," she said, while reiterating that the findings do indicate "a generalized sex difference in the way the reward system functions."

Lona Sandon, program director in the department of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, said the findings are "not necessarily a surprise."

For example, Sandon said that, in her experience, women are more likely to talk about food cravings and struggle with eating disorders, such as binge eating. In addition, women are "much more likely to talk about how they turn to food to address mood, particularly foods high in sugar or fat," she added.

What should these women do? Sandon advised getting off the couch.

"Low dopamine levels are associated with depression, which is often compensated for by eating more food," she said. "But exercise has been shown in several studies to be beneficial for individuals with depression. Exercise can also have positive effects on appetite.

"So I would suggest that physical activity or exercise might be part of the answer," Sandon added.

Gupta and her colleagues are scheduled to report their findings Tuesday at the Digestive Disease Week meeting in Chicago. Research presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed journal.

More information

There's more on obesity risk at the U.S National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.