611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Health Policy & Advocacy
Resources
Basic InformationMore InformationLatest News
Many Dermatology Guideline Authors Get Industry PaymentsDoctors Urged to Speak With Patients About FirearmsStates That Make You Wait to Buy Guns Have Fewer Deaths: StudyHomicides Devastate Black Communities, But Prevention Gets Little FundingBetter Patient Communication Needed After Urgent CareQuality Issues for Both Paper-, Electronic-Based Health RecordsRide-Sharing Services Could Cut Alcohol-Related CrashesLow-Cost Services a Major Player in Unnecessary Health SpendingMedical License Questions Sway Doctors' Mental Health Help'Heat-Not-Burn Cigarettes' Aiming for U.S. MarketInjured Patients Want More Info on Safety Improvement EffortsFDA Approves Test to Screen Donated Blood for Zika21 Percent of Americans Report Experiencing a Medical ErrorUber Can Help Cut Car Crashes, But Not EverywhereThe Unexpected Faces of the UninsuredHealth Tip: Giving BloodCommunication Program Doesn't Raise Hospital Liability CostsSame Pregnancy Meds Can Cost $200 -- or $11,000Americans More Open About Mental Health Issues, But Stigma Lingers1 in 5 Have Been Hit By a Medical Error, Survey ShowsOpioid Manufacturers to Provide Doctor TrainingPatients' E-Records Still Not Widely AvailableU.S. Gun Injuries Nearing $3 Billion in ER, Hospital CostsState Laws Can Promote Hepatitis C Virus ScreeningTeens Mixed Up With the Law May Fall Through Medicaid CracksState Policies Can Reduce Alcohol-Related MurdersBlame Common in Patient Safety Incident ReportsCDC Launches Opioid Campaign in Hard-Hit StatesU.S. Pays a Hefty Price for ObesityBlacks, Elderly Missing From U.S. Cancer Clinical TrialsFood Stamp Benefits May Lower Health Care CostsFrequent Blood Donations Safe for Some, But Not AllDrone Sets New Record for Transporting Blood SamplesGun Injuries Add Millions of Dollars to Hospital CostsACP Does Not Support Legalization of Assisted SuicideAAP: Few Doctors Provide Firearm Injury Prevention Info in ER9 of 10 Docs Unprepared to Prescribe MarijuanaThis Mistake Can Cost Athletes' Lives in Cardiac ArrestDrills Assess ER Response to Communicable DiseaseDo Nursing Home Workers Change Gloves Often Enough?Minorities Exposed to Dirtier Air, U.S. Study FindsPhysicians Tweeting About Drugs May Have Conflict of Interest'Science Spin' Found Prevalent in Biomedical LiteratureHealth Tip: Overcoming the Obesity EpidemicU.S. Military Surgeons Helped More Than 6,000 Afghan AdultsWhat You Can Do to Help Fight the Opioid EpidemicAre Physicians Obligated to Help on Planes?Median Cost of Cancer Drug Development $648.0 MillionDoes Study Claim a Cure? Beware of Scientific 'Spin'Vaccine Campaign in Poor Countries to Save 20 Million Lives
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Health Insurance
Healthcare

More Starring Roles for Booze in Kids' Movies, Study Finds

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: May 4th 2017

new article illustration

THURSDAY, May 4, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol marketing in movies increased significantly over the past two decades, especially in popular children's films, researchers report.

Dartmouth's Dr. James Sargent isn't happy about that.

"Children and young people look to movie stars as role models," said study co-author Sargent, a professor of pediatrics at Dartmouth School of Medicine.

"For alcohol companies, when a favorite star uses a certain brand of alcohol, that brand gets linked to all the characteristics young admirers see in their movie idol," Sargent said.

"That's why it's no surprise that the brands commonly shown in movies are the most highly advertised brands, and the same brands underage drinkers tend to drink," he added in an American Academy of Pediatrics news release.

For the study, the researchers analyzed the top movies in the United States between 1996 and 2015. The investigators found that alcohol brand placement rose an average of 5 percent a year, and 92 percent overall during the study period.

Almost nine out of 10 movies portrayed alcohol use, with specific brands appearing in 44 percent of films. Characters were shown drinking alcohol in 85 percent of the top movies rated for children, and specific brands appeared in about four out of 10 child-rated movies.

Budweiser, Miller and Heineken beer accounted for one-third of all brand placements, with Budweiser appearing in the highest percentage of child-rated movies (15 percent), the study found.

According to study co-author Samantha Cukier, who is also at Dartmouth, "Alcohol continues to be the drug of choice among young people."

Drinking causes 4,300 deaths each year among Americans younger than 21, she added.

These new findings are concerning because movie exposure to booze has been repeatedly shown to predict future alcohol use and higher rates of problem drinking, Cukier said.

"The high frequency of brand placements in movies aimed at children and young adolescents raises questions about the adequacy of alcohol marketing self-regulation," Cukier said. "I don't think they are doing enough to avoid the underage segment in their movie alcohol placements."

The study is scheduled for presentation Tuesday at the Pediatric Academic Societies meeting in San Francisco. Data and conclusions presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism urges parents to talk to their children about alcohol.