611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Medical Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Functional Interaction Seen for Dietary Carbohydrates With AMDTaking Opioids Before Knee Surgery Could Raise Pain LaterATS: First Abx Rx Doesn't Work for ~25% of Pneumonia CasesActemra Approved for Certain Blood Vessel InflammationStudy Casts Doubt on Need for Statins in the 'Healthy Old'First-Try Antibiotics Now Fail in 1 in 4 Adult Pneumonia CasesOvercrowded ERs Risky for Some Seriously Ill PatientsHigh Vitamin K1 Intake Linked to Reduced Cataract RiskPoverty Could Make Lupus Even WorseCDC: Crypto Outbreaks Linked to Pools Have Doubled Since 2014Could Cancer Drug Gleevec Help With Severe Asthma?Zika Mosquito Can Transmit Other Viruses, TooFDA OKs Kalydeco for Additional Mutations in Cystic FibrosisKalydeco Approval Widened for More Types of Cystic FibrosisAnother Step Toward Ebola ProtectionThe Water's Not Fine: U.S. Pool-Linked Infection Doubles in 2 YearsJust 2 Weeks on the Couch Can Trigger Body's DeclineGene Therapy Might Someday Mend Badly Broken Bones'Healthy Obese' May Be a MythNo Evidence Steroids Benefit Symptomatic Knee OsteoarthritisHeart Attack Risk Spikes After Respiratory Infection, Study FindsFor Inflamed Pancreas, Eating Right Away May Be Best MedicineFindings Support More Targeted Approach to Cholesterol ScreensHouston, You Have a 'Superbug'Forget Steroid Shots for Long-Term Relief of Arthritic KneesFDA Approves New Device to Treat Esophageal AtresiaMany U.S. Travelers Skip Measles Shots, Despite Infection RiskMany Under 40 May Not Need Regular Cholesterol Checks: StudyNew Device Approved for Esophageal Birth DefectACP: Recommendations Updated for Low Bone Density TreatmentMosquito-Borne Illnesses May Not Be Limited to TropicsArthroscopy for Degenerative Knees Deemed Seldom EffectiveBioengineered Intraabdominal Endocrine Pancreas FeasibleAllergies Getting Worse? Blame Climate ChangeA 2nd Life for Risky Kidney Transplants?Blood Vessel-Clearing Procedure Riskier on Weekends: StudyMultidrug-Resistant TB Set to Increase Through 2040Coming This Summer: More Ticks and a Deadly New Tick-Borne DiseaseAdherence to DASH Diet May Help Lower Occurrence of Gout'Groundbreaking Strides' Made in Zika Vaccine ResearchNew Guidelines Say No to Most 'Keyhole' Knee SurgeriesWhat Harms the Young Heart Also Hurts the Brain LaterHope for 1st Drug Against Lymphedema, a Cancer ComplicationHealth Tip: Getting Over a Stomach VirusEat This Diet to Lower Your Odds for Painful GoutPCSK9 Linked to New-Onset Diabetes After Renal TransplantZika Risk May Be Lower Than Thought for Some Pregnant WomenDDW: Autonomously-Controlled 'Capsule Robot' Can Explore ColonInternet-Based Vestibular Rehab Beneficial for DizzinessTestosterone May Protect Men From Allergic Asthma
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Cancer
Men's Health
Women's Health

For Some, Too Much Sweat Takes Emotional Toll

HealthDay News
by -- Mary Elizabeth Dallas
Updated: Apr 6th 2017

new article illustration

THURSDAY, April 6, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Don't sweat the small stuff. That's sound advice for most -- but not if you're one of the 7 million Americans diagnosed with hyperhidrosis.

People with hyperhidrosis sweat for no obvious reason. And their overactive temperature control system can cause them to avoid social settings altogether.

Hyperhidrosis often goes undiagnosed, said Dr. Robert Korst, medical director of the Valley Health System's hyperhidrosis center in Ridgewood, N.J.

Sweating is an involuntary activity that helps control body temperature. The body sweats to cool down and excrete waste products, Korst explained in a health system news release.

However, people with hyperhidrosis sweat more than necessary to regulate body temperature. The mere thought of shaking hands can moisten their palms, armpits or even their feet.

In some cases, hyperhidrosis happens all over the body, Korst said.

Excess perspiration can generate anxiety and discomfort, particularly in social gatherings, he added. The sweating can occur at any time, even when the body doesn't need to cool down. Certain foods, nicotine and caffeine can worsen the condition.

Hyperhidrosis often starts during childhood, and genetics may play a role in its development, Korst noted. There are three main types, each with its own treatment:

  • Primary focal hyperhidrosis: Someone with this condition may be treated with medication or perhaps surgery. The problematic sweating occurs in specific parts of the body, such as the feet, hands, underarms or face. In severe cases, sweat drips from the skin, which can lead to anxiety and depression or skin irritation and infections.
  • Generalized idiopathic hyperhidrosis: This form involves excessive sweating on a large area of the body.
  • Secondary generalized hyperhidrosis: A medical condition -- such as menopause, thyroid disorder or diabetes -- can cause this type of hyperhidrosis. It can also result from medication, exercise or heat. A dermatologist can help determine the cause and recommend a treatment.

More information

The American Academy of Dermatology has more about hyperhidrosis.