611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Smoking
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
More Hardcore Smokers Trying to Kick the Habit'Heat-Not-Burn Cigarettes' Aiming for U.S. MarketSmoking Cessation Support Less Likely for Cancer PatientsFewer Deaths Projected With Switch to Electronic CigarettesSwitch From Smoking to Vaping Could Save Over 6 Million U.S. LivesWill an E-Cigarette Harm Your Heart?Higher Cigarette Taxes May Mean Fewer Infant DeathsHIV and Smoking a Lethal Combo for the LungsDo E-Cigarettes Damage Blood Vessels?Pre-Cosmetic Sx Advice May Aid Long-Term Smoking CessationSmoking Bans Help Kids Breathe EasierE-Cigs May Help Smokers Quit, But …Smoking Linked to Frailty in SeniorsHealth Groups Demand 'R' Rating for Movies That Show SmokingFDA Will Target E-Cigs in Health Campaign for YouthFDA Looks to Reduce Nicotine in CigarettesMore E-Cigarettes, Fewer Tobacco Smokers?Create Your Own Quit-Smoking PlanQuitting Smoking Can Bring Healthier Sinuses Years Later: StudyDo Moms Who Smoke in Pregnancy Raise Their Odds for a Troubled Teen?Smoking On the Rise in Movies Aimed at Young: StudyComparable Metabolic Effects for E-Cigarettes, SmokingE-Cigarettes Lead to 'Real' Smoking by Teens: ReviewSecondhand Smoke Still Plagues Some Cancer SurvivorsRaise the Smoking Age to 21? Most Kids Fine With ThatMany Young Americans Using Snuff, Chewing TobaccoFirst Decline Seen in 'Vaping' Among U.S. Teens: CDCDistinct Features for Quitting Smoking After Crohn's DiagnosisJust 10 Cigarettes During Pregnancy Can Harm KidsFiltered Cigarettes May Up Rates of Lung AdenocarcinomaCould 'Safer' Filtered Cigarettes Be More Deadly?AUA: E-Cigarettes Can Also Cause DNA Damage to Bladder MucosaE-Cigarettes Linked to Bladder Cancer RiskEven 'Social Smoking' Negatively Affects Cardiovascular HealthJust a 'Social Smoker'? Toll on Your Health Still HighCould Smoking in Pregnancy Affect a Grandkid's Autism Risk?NYC to Raise Cigarette Prices to Highest in the United StatesKids Can Pick Up Nicotine on Their HandsSmoking May Raise Risk of Complications After Joint SurgeryMost Americans Favor Larger Health Warnings on Cigarette PacksMost Remaining U.S. Smokers Are Poor, Less EducatedSmokers May Be Prone to Risks From Breast Cancer Radiation TherapyTobacco Use in Youth Higher Among Sexual MinoritiesSmoking Ups Long-Term Risks From Radiotherapy in Breast CASmoking Rates Drop After Global Tobacco Treaty1 in 4 Teens Exposed to Secondhand E-Cig Vapors: ReportSmokers Prone to Problems After Joint Replacement: StudyMost Doctors Recommend FDA-Approved Drugs Before E-CigsSecondhand Smoke Linked to Food Allergies in KidsMany Smokers Switch to E-Cigs After Tobacco-Related Illness
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Wellness and Personal Development

1 in 4 Teens Exposed to Secondhand E-Cig Vapors: Report

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Mar 20th 2017

new article illustration

MONDAY, March 20, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- One-quarter of U.S. middle and high school students say they've been exposed to potentially dangerous secondhand e-cigarette vapors, a federal government study shows.

E-cigarette vapors can contain harmful substances such as nicotine, according to the U.S. Surgeon General. E-cigarette devices can also be used for marijuana and other illicit drugs.

Researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention analyzed data from the 2015 National Youth Tobacco Survey. They found that more than 24 percent of middle and high school students said they had been exposed to e-cigarette vapors in an indoor or outdoor location at least once in the previous 30 days. That amounted to 6.5 million students.

Rates of exposure for specific groups were: almost 22 percent among males; close to 27 percent among females; 24.5 percent among Hispanics; 27 percent among whites; just over 15 percent among blacks, and close to 22 percent among other races.

Students exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke were much more likely to be exposed to secondhand e-cigarette vapors than other students, 40 percent vs. 8.5 percent.

Rates of exposure to secondhand e-cigarette vapors were almost 67 percent among current e-cig users, 29 percent among former users and 16.4 percent among teens who never used e-cigs.

Exposure rates to e-cigarette vapors were 51.5 percent among current tobacco product users, just over 32 percent among former users and close to 17 percent among students who never used tobacco.

The study was published March 20 in the journal JAMA Pediatrics.

"We know that secondhand e-cigarette aerosol is not harmless," said study co-author Brian King, deputy director for research translation in the CDC's Office on Smoking and Health.

"It's critical to protect our nation's youth from this preventable health risk," he said in an agency news release.

Study lead author Teresa Wang said, "To protect youth from both secondhand smoke and secondhand aerosol, smoke-free policies can be modernized to include e-cigarettes." She is an epidemic intelligence service officer at the CDC.

"These policies can maintain current standards for clean indoor air, reduce the potential for renormalizing tobacco product use, and prevent involuntary exposure to nicotine and other emissions from e-cigarettes," Wang said.

More information

The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse has more about e-cigarettes.