611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Health Sciences
Resources
Basic InformationLatest News
Why Your Nose May Be Key to Parkinson's RiskEvolution Not Over for HumansBrain Scans Offer Clues to Why Some Teens Pile on PoundsNew Clues to Why Yawns Are ContagiousNew Hope From Old Drugs in Fight Against Parkinson'sFirst Gene Therapy Approved in U.S.Awake for Aneurysm Brain Surgery, Better Results?Does Autism Risk Reside in Cells' Energy Engines?More Evidence Contact Sports Can Affect the BrainVirtual House Calls for Speedy, Effective Parkinson's CareSeven Imaging Biomarkers Tied to Cognition in Male FightersDiabetes Drug Shows Promise Against Parkinson'sCombined MRI Might Help Predict Brain Damage in BoxersMedical Reality Catches Up to Science FictionNoninvasive Brain Test May Pinpoint Type of DementiaIn Mice, Brain Cells Discovered That Might Control AgingScans May Show Consciousness in 'Comatose' PatientsBoxers, MMA Fighters May Face Long-Term Harm to Brain: StudyFDA Panel OKs What May Soon Be First Gene Therapy Approved in U.S.Early Parkinson's May Prompt Vision ProblemsWhole-Genome Sequencing of Uncertain Clinical UtilityCould Shift Work Damage Your DNA?Gene Sequencing May Reveal Risks for Rare DiseasesRogue Genes May Cause Some ALS CasesSticky Brain 'Plaques' Implicated in Alzheimer's AgainEven Your Bones Can Get Fat, Mouse Study SuggestsDoes a Low-Fat Dairy Habit Boost Parkinson's Risk?MicroRNA Biomarker Signature Identified for Allergic AsthmaHaywire Immune Cells May Help Cause BaldnessRegion in Brain Associated With Fear of Uncertain FutureBrain Scans Spot Where Fear and Anxiety LiveGene Therapy Might Someday Mend Badly Broken BonesLife Expectancy Slighter Shorter With Parkinson's, DementiaStudy Looks at Parkinson's Effect on Life SpanBody Cooling May Help Brain After Cardiac ArrestDo You Overeat? Your Brain Wiring May Be WhyGene Mutation May Speed Alzheimer's DeclineIs This Enzyme Making You Fat?Type 2 Diabetes May Be Bad for Brain Health'Brain Age' May Help Predict When You'll DieParkinson's Disease May Originate in Gut, Study SaysBlood-Based Genome Testing Feasible for Rapid Mutation AssayBlood Test May Gauge Death Risk After Surgery150-Year-Old Drug May Shorten 'Off' Time for Parkinson's PatientsBrain May Be Organized by Functions, Not Body PartsBody Temperature Might Give Clues to ComaCould Young Blood Boost the Aging Brain?A 'Brainwave' to Help Fight PTSDDizziness in Parkinson's May Be Due to Cerebral HypoperfusionMisunderstood Gene Tests May Lead to Unnecessary Mastectomies
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Medical Disorders
Mental Disorders
Mental Health Professions

30 Former NFL Players Pledge Their Brains for Research

HealthDay News
by -- Mary Elizabeth Dallas
Updated: Feb 3rd 2017

new article illustration

FRIDAY, Feb. 3, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Thirty former NFL players have joined the growing number of retired players who have pledged to donate their brains to research on a devastating brain disease that has been linked to the repetitive head trauma.

Scientists believe that multiple concussions, or even less severe blows to the head, may trigger chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative brain condition, according to the Concussion Legacy Foundation.

Numerous NFL players have been diagnosed with CTE after their deaths. Performing an autopsy is the only way to definitively diagnose the condition, the Boston-based foundation explained in a news release.

Last month, a $1 billion concussion lawsuit settlement for former NFL players was upheld by the U.S. Supreme Court despite legal challenges from some retired players.

The ruling means that payouts can begin to former players who develop long-term brain problems due to head injuries suffered while in the league.

"I can't imagine why anybody that played the game and that cares about the guys and the kids that are starting to play the game now, wouldn't donate," Randy Cross said in explaining his decision to donate his brain to research. Cross is a three-time Pro Bowl offensive lineman who played for the San Francisco 49ers from 1976 to 1988.

"I would urge everybody that's ever played the game to do it," the College Football Hall of Famer added.

Three-time Pro Bowl guard Keith Sims and Pro Bowl cornerback Shawn Springs also pledged their brains to the same end.

Sims was an offensive lineman in the NFL for 11 years with the Miami Dolphins and the Washington Redskins. Springs was an NFL cornerback for 13 years with the Seattle Seahawks, the Washington Redskins and New England Patriots.

"As we start to see the effects of football, we want to learn more," Springs said. "Why wouldn't I give my brain to help with the research so people can become more educated and more aware?"

Mel Farr Jr. is also among the former NFL players who have just pledged to donate their brains to research on head trauma. Farr played one season for the Los Angeles Rams. His decision came just days after his family disclosed on ESPN that his father, Detroit Lions Pro Bowl running back Mel Farr Sr., had advanced CTE when he died in 2015, the foundation said.

CTE affects more than football players, the foundation noted. A total of 1,467 former athletes, from all sports backgrounds, and military veterans have pledged to donate their brains to the foundation over the past nine years. Soccer great Brandi Chastain and NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. have also made this pledge.

In 2008, the foundation created a brain bank in cooperation with Boston University and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. It is now the world's largest CTE brain bank that has a particular focus on concussion, ALS and other conditions linked to brain trauma. To date, 385 brains have been donated, of more than 240 have been confirmed to have had CTE.

"Pledging to donate your brain is a fantastic way for current and former athletes to contribute to brain trauma research," said Chris Nowinski, co-founder and CEO of the foundation.

"Brain bank research is an essential step in learning to prevent and treat CTE, and [it] has provided insights that have launched multiple studies at the Boston University CTE Center focused on developing diagnostics and therapeutics," Nowinski added.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides more information on concussion.