611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

Health Choice Integrated Care crisis Line
1-877-756-4090

NurseWise 24-Hour Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530



SEABHS
611 W. Union Street
Benson, AZ 85602
(520) 586-0800

NurseWise 24-Hr Crisis Line
1-866-495-6735

NAZCARE Warm Line
1-888-404-5530


powered by centersite dot net

Getting Started
Here are some forms to get started. These can be printed and brought with you so that you can pre-fill out some known info ahead of time. More...


Mental Disorders
Resources
Basic InformationLookupsLatest News
Ketamine Beneficial for Certain Patients With Mood DisordersPatients Reluctant to Comply With Drug-Only Psychiatric TreatmentPatients Often Reject Drug-Only Psychiatric TreatmentStudy Links Psychiatric Disorders to Stroke RiskAnxiety, Depression May Up Mortality Risk for Some CancersMental Health May Affect Chances Against CancerObamacare Covered More People With Mental Illness, AddictionsMany With Mental Illness Miss Out on HIV TestsPlastic Surgeons Often Miss Patients' Mental DisordersMortality Risk in T2DM Increased With Depression and/or AnxietyMost Smokers With Mental Illness Want to Kick the HabitRate of Psychiatric Drug Use About 16 Percent in U.S. Adults1 in 6 U.S. Adults Takes a Psychiatric Drug: StudyFor People With Mental Health Woes, Pets Can Be InvaluableHealth Tip: Thinking About Psychological Therapy?Heart Rate, BP in Male Teens Tied to Later Risk for Psych DisordersU.S. Psychiatric Patients Face Long Waits in ERsAre Some Blood Pressure Meds Linked to Depression, Bipolar Risk?Study Links Pot Use to Relapse in Psychosis PatientsInternet Addiction May Be Red Flag for Other Mental Health Issues: StudyPsychiatric Patients Face Longer Waits in ERParents' Psychiatric Issues May Adversely Affect Some ChildrenAntipsychotic Meds Pose Little Danger to Fetus, Study FindsInfertility Patients' Mental Health Problems Often UnaddressedStudy of Teen Brains Offers Clues to Timing of Mental IllnessHealth Tip: Take Steps to Stay Mentally HealthyAre 'Workaholics' Prone to OCD, Anxiety?Mentally Ill Still Gain Illegal Possession of Guns, Study ShowsMental Disorders Were Most Costly in U.S. in 2013For New Antipsychotic Users, Dose, Duration Impact MortalityNo Link Between Anti-Smoking Drugs, Mental Health Issues: StudyU.S. Soldier in Custody Following Slaying of 5 Americans in Iraq
Questions and AnswersLinksBook Reviews
Related Topics

Anxiety Disorders
Bipolar Disorder
Depression: Depression & Related Conditions
Schizophrenia
Eating Disorders

Many With Mental Illness Miss Out on HIV Tests

HealthDay News
by -- Robert Preidt
Updated: Jan 19th 2017

new article illustration

THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with severe mental illness are only slightly more likely to be screened for HIV than those in the general population, a new study finds.

And that's true even though they're at higher risk for infection with the AIDS-causing virus, the researchers added.

The study included nearly 57,000 Medicaid patients in California. They were between the ages of 18 and 67. They were all taking medications to treat bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or major depression with psychosis.

Just under 7 percent had HIV testing, compared with 5 percent of the state's general population in 2011, according to the study.

The authors said their findings suggest a missed opportunity to treat HIV infection early in people with severe mental illness. The risk of HIV may be up to 15 percent higher in people with severe mental illness than in the general population, the researchers said.

"This is a missed prevention opportunity to detect HIV early in the course of illness. People with severe mental illness have higher rates of unsafe behaviors that put them at risk for HIV infection," said study first author Dr. Christina Mangurian. She's with the University of California, San Francisco's department of psychiatry.

Those risky behaviors may include having unprotected sex with HIV-positive partners and partners of unknown HIV status, injecting drugs, and episodes of sexual violence, she explained.

"Previous studies have found that people with severe mental illness die up to 25 years earlier than the general population," Mangurian said in a university news release.

Most of those deaths are from early heart disease. But, HIV and other infectious diseases also contribute to earlier deaths in people with severe mental illness, she said.

"Effective treatments are widely available and people with severe mental illness appear to comply with antiretroviral therapies at rates similar to other groups. We believe that annual HIV testing should be strongly considered by public mental health administrators," Mangurian said.

The study was published Jan. 17 in the journal Psychiatric Services.

More information

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has more on HIV testing.